The Iran Dossier

The latest in-depth report from Iraq by the Weekly Standard‘s Kimberly Kagan:

But one thing is very clear: Iran has consistently supplied weapons, its own advisors, and Lebanese Hezbollah advisors to multiple resistance groups in Iraq, both Sunni and Shia, and has supported these groups as they have targeted Sunni Arabs, Coalition forces, Iraqi Security Forces, and the Iraqi Government itself. Their infl uence runs from Kurdistan to Basrah, and Coalition sources report that by August 2007, Iranian-backed insurgents accounted for roughly half the attacks on Coalition forces, a dramatic change from previous periods that had seen the overwhelming majority of attacks coming from the Sunni Arab insurgency and al Qaeda.

The Coalition has stepped-up its efforts to combat Iranian intervention in Iraq in recent months both because the Iranians have increased their support for violence in Iraq since the start of the surge and because Coalition successes against al Qaeda in Iraq and the larger Sunni Arab insurgency have permitted the re-allocation of resources and effort against a problem that has plagued attempts to establish a stable government in Iraq from the outset. With those problems increasingly under control, Iranian intervention is the next major problem the Coalition must tackle.

Read the entire – long – report at the link above, where you can also access Kagan’s earlier reports.

For the perspective of the military in Iraq, check out Greyhawk’s latest at Mudville Gazette:

Speaking of the Petraeus report….

It seems that those who routinely feed from the various toilets along the left wing information sewer are currently being instructed how to feel about said upcoming report. (Not think, mind you, but feel. Feel might not be exactly the right word either, but it’s closer to it than thinking, which is an altogether different process.) It’s a pretty slick trick – once again begging the question “are the people who write this stuff ignorant, or do they just think their readers are?”

The answer, of course, is inconsequential.

Read it all, and access the embedded links, at the link preceding.

Media Coverage in Iraq
Poverty in America
  • kim

    The success of the surge is not related to increased resolve, increased strength, or even increased support at home. It is because we have finally been recognized for the good cops we are, and because the Sunni and the Shia have recognized their common Arab ethnicity as opposed to the Persian.

    Eight months ago, Sistani, the highest spiritual authority in Shia Iraq, retreated to the mosque and refused to answer political questions any longer. He was frustrated at the power of Sadr to incite violence at will. Within months, Sadr was over the border in Iran, fleeing from our attacks on his death squads. The rural Sunni tribesmen saw our troops defend their city mouse cousins from the Shia death squads. Now, the Arab consciousness of Iraq is asserting itself, in opposition to the Persian influence. The political leaders of all of Iraq have just compromised, under perhaps some push from pan-Arab Allawi, and the spiritual leaders have likewise declared a fatwah against violence. Sadr, in a foolish, endgame maneuver, violated that fatwah in a highly symbolic manner, and has hurt Persian influence for years.

    The war is essentially over. The Iraqis had enough.
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  • kim

    I also think Cheney had a little talk with the King of the Sauds about Persia. I also think the King of the Sauds had a little talk with the sensible Persian mullahs about how indecorous it is for Muslims to kill Muslims instead of infidels.
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  • FreedomFries

    Kagan from the Weekly Standard?? Peopaganda from the PNAC horse’s mouth.

  • Reagan

    It’s not a surge. It’s an Escalation. Dumbed down understandings of the english language will not save the right wing from their own clusterfucks this time.

    It’s quite funny seeing the rhetoric pushed up in the American bubble while the rest of the world has no problem.

    Oh, and this current US hysterics is based on a bad translation of the Iranian president’s speech. I should know, my wife speaks Persian.

  • kim

    What explains past US hysterics about Ahmadinejad, then? It is difficult to translate insanity; does your wife have practice?
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  • kim

    “Rest of the world has no problems”? France, Germany, and Russia all got a little tougher on Iran recently, because they didn’t recognize he now has missiles which can reach their urban areas? You are not insane, my friend, just misinformed.
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  • http://www.progressivevalues.blogspot.com Paul Hooson

    With very little real investment, Iran hopes to gain some real influence in Iraq, thanks to the instability the war has created. In the future, American foreign policy needs to be better thought out to avoid generating the worst possible outcome like this war likely will for American interests in the Mideast.

  • moseby

    maybe we should return the iranian weapons we find in iraq by dropping them in tehran on their shithole capital building or whatever they use to run that crummy country…it’ll be easy to find…the biggest building that looks like the most like Fred Flintstone’s house.

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