30,000 march for democracy in Myanmar (Burma)

Two days after 2000 Buddhist monks were allowed to gather and pray outside the home of pro-democracy leader Aung San Suu Kyi, under virtual house arrest for nineteen years (since even before her party overwhelmingly won the last free elections – which the military junta ignored), over 30,000 marchers expressed their dissent in Yangon, reports the AFP. (Read the story at the link).

Security forces are on high alert, so this may be the introduction to another brutal crackdown – or the beginning of a crack in the wall of dictatorship which has kept the country isolated from the rest of the world for the last two decades.

UPDATE: Gateway Pundit has more – demonstrations continue to grow, and the regime is issuing vague warnings against the protests.

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  • kim

    Maybe not the same junta, but can you say isolated from the world for the last half century?
    =====================================

  • I hope it’s just the beginning of a renewed revolutionary movement in Burma.

  • nogo war

    Why do they hate their nation?
    They obviously are not patriots.

  • SCSIwuzzy

    nogo, why not go to Iran. I hear your kind is scarce on the ground there these days. Their president said so at Columbia.

  • Joe75

    >> Why do they hate their nation?

    nogo, I’m having a hard time understanding your comment. To whom are you referring, the monks, the students, or the military?

    Perhaps you simply don’t have a firm grasp on the situation. Take a few minutes to google Burma (Myanmar), human rights, and especially the 8888 movement and you’ll begin to understand the stakes in play here.

    If on the other hand, your remark was meant to be flippant, you should realize that this is a deadly situation that has played out before, with a very bloody, violent conclusion. My wife (immigrated from Burma) was a student in Rangoon during the 1988 revolt and remembers the bodies being piled in cars and hauled away. Not a good subject to joke about.

    People there who get the governments attention simply disappear. If on some slim chance they are ever seen again (years later) they’re aren’t the same person coming out of prison that they were going in.

    Like you, I’m not a fan of the US getting involved in other sovereign nations affairs. But if there is one regime on earth that needs a little Iraq-style TLC from the US military it’s the one in Burma. The dictatorship there makes Saddam’s bunch look practically benevolent.

    Off-topic (don’t want to derail the thread) but if there was ever an argument for civilian access to firearms, Burma is it. I pray that the monks and students are effective in bringing democracy to their country. However, when people try to overthrow a corrupt heavily-armed military and the only weapons they have are swords and improvised slingshots, guess who usually wins?

    Sorry for the rant.

    /lurk on