A whopping TWO New Jerseyans sign up for new ObamaCare benefits

I’m not making this up, folks:

Just two people in New Jersey will begin receiving coverage Monday under new plans created by federal health care reforms.

NJ Protect plans are available to those who have been without insurance for at least six months and submit evidence of pre-existing health conditions.

The state will receive $141 million in federal subsidies to cover claims that exceed the premiums paid by the beneficiaries.

… Two policies are available, with premiums ranging from $212 to $768 monthly, depending on age.

Ah, perhaps this is the problem. ObamaCare was supposed to be ‘free,’ or at least ‘affordable’ wasn’t it?

On Friday, Rush Limbaugh took a call from “Stacy,” who has called the program several times before, and who works as an analyst in the health insurance industry. “Stacy” explained many of the details of Georgia’s version of the ObamaCare pre-existing condition or “high risk” health plan, to Rush and his audience. Far from being free, the plan actually includes:

  • a minimum $2500 annual deductible; only preventative diagnoses are excluded from the deductible
  • deductible must be met before any other health care expenses (drugs, emergency room visits, lab work, durable medical equipment, etc.) are covered
  • $25 doctor visit copay, with 80/20 cost split for in-network physicians or 60/40 cost split for out-of-network physicians, for the next $6000 in costs after the deductible has been met
  • a “healthcare savings account” structure to assist insureds with out of pocket costs
  • a $15,000 cap on hospice care

The minimum individual premium for the Georgia plan is $323 per month, or nearly $4000 annually. Tack on the $2500 deductible, and you’re looking at $6500 a year guaranteed health care costs, not including another $1200 out of pocket that you could pay as your 20% share of the next $6000 in medical costs.

Supporters of ObamaCare insisted that government-managed health plans were the only way to guarantee coverage and substantially reduce the “outrageous” and “completely unacceptable” insurance rates paid by high-risk insureds. About the only thing this insurance plan guarantees is very lackluster catastrophic insurance coverage, at rates similar to what high-risk patients already pay.

As far as affordability goes, for a patient with diabetes or a similar medical condition that requires a significant amount of regular medication, equipment, and doctor visits, the ObamaCare high-risk health plan is a disaster. I would venture to guess that most of the other state-sponsored/ObamaCare-mandated high risk insurance plans are similar to Georgia’s.

Those of us who tried to decipher what ObamaCare would actually deliver should not be surprised by any of this. But millions of Americans who thought that health care would be less expensive, easier to obtain, and higher quality as a result of Federal government involvement are about to be sorely disappointed.

The new Georgia high risk health insurance plan is available online at www.pciplan.com.

One more thing, it remains to be seen how effective ‘government subsidies’ will be in helping insureds with out of pocked costs. My guess is that pharmacies and medical equipment suppliers will probably frown on government IOU’s in lieu of cash payments.

ADDED: I neglected to mention that under the current health care law, all Americans will be forced to purchase health insurance. If you have a preexisting condition, this is the kind of insurance plan — and its associated costs — that you will be required to participate in, under penalty of law.

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  • tomg51

    “you’re looking at $6500 a year guaranteed health care costs”

    Yikes – hope that’s not required of anyone ;-)

  • http://doublenickelfarm.blogspot.com jennifer

    Yep, we had to pass the bill to see what was in the bill. Folks we get what we deserve if we do not make changes. It is time to remove the political class from power, and we need to stop this craziness.

  • Nine Fourteen

    2 People? Wow! Now if Barry could just create at least half that many jobz we’d be dancing in the streets.

  • Dane

    Obama never said it was free.

    Show us where he said that.

    “NJ Protect plans are available to those who have been without insurance for at least six months and submit evidence of pre-existing health conditions.”

    Do you have any idea what people without health insurance who have pre-existing conditions have to pay in the open market?

    Why don’t you try analyzing the stuff you write – you know, do the math – compare, research. Leave the knee-jerk reactionary stuff to Fox News.

    Or is it just a situation here you think your audience is too dumb and needs to be fed these talking points instead? Seriously – You think $325 a month is expensive for someone with pre-existing conditions????

  • http://www.wizbangblog.com Michael Laprarie

    Dane,

    “You think $325 a month is expensive for someone with pre-existing conditions????”

    Apparently two people in New Jersey think it’s quite a bargain.

    Seriously, the whole point of government-managed health care was to 1) eliminate denial of coverage/denial of claims, and 2) to make costs affordable for everyone. $325 a month for individual insurance is a decent rate, but look at the coverage. The deductible is very high, which means you’re paying for everything out of pocket until you’ve spent $2500 — and that’s in addition to the premium, which you have to pay every month.

    Those who can afford the premium can now have major medical coverage, but they get “squat” in terms of real benefits — drug coverage, affordable copays, etc. Those who are low income or fixed income, who can’t afford the premium, are just as bad off as they were before. And aren’t these the people ObamaCare was designed to benefit the most?

    “Obama never said it was free.”

    Really? Somebody sure did.

  • DaveD

    Dane, I am as surprised as you at the number of people who have the impression that ObamaCare would be a free service. I don’t know where these folks got this impression but I do know that the existence of this group of ignoramuses is essential to the successful passage of the “progressive” agenda. Obama is on record of guaranteeing the reversal of the “crushing cost of healthcare”. I agree with Michael that the costs listed above are not a super bargain for those who might need this program the most. I think most of these folks will feel duped no matter what you think. The Democrats have been notorious for painting an overly optimistic picture of their agenda and almost immediately lowering expectations once legislation is passed.

  • GarandFan

    Come on Dane! You’re not trying! Stick up for THE ONE! He’s just ‘spreading the wealth’, right? I’m sure His policy will be just like everyone elses. Right?

    Go drink your kool aid. You’ll feel better. Totally oblivious to reality, but you’ll feel better.

  • Roy

    You used whopping and New Jersey in the same sentence. Racist!

  • John S

    “you’re looking at $6500 a year guaranteed health care costs”

    Come 2014, we’re ALL looking at this or more whether we’re lucky enough to still have a part-time minimum wage job or not…

  • Justrand

    I think Obama is gonna pay for it with “Obama Cash”…after he fills up my gastank and pays my mortgage, of course.

    If Obama was a huckster for products on Midnight TV they’d throw him in jail for false advertising.

  • Caesar Augustus

    A few more Obama ‘success stories’ like this one and we’ll soon witness the death of the Republic – literally.

  • jim m

    So Barry promises affordable health care for everyone and when it turns out that it costs more and you get less, the left whines, “Obama never said it was free”.

    The stupid health care bill was branded in the House as “The Affordable Health Care for America Act” for crying out loud. The Senate bill was the “Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act”.

    So now you’re trying to tell me that affordability was never part of it?

    Screw you Dane. You don’t even lie as well as Lee Ward.

  • jim m

    Oh, and just to be clear on this: No one here is saying the Barry promised free health care (although the dems tried really hard to imply it), but $6500 per year is a hell of a lot more than what most people in employer health plans pay.

    So we are left with health care that covers less, cost more out of our pockets and drains the federal budget. Only the dems could find a bill that makes something that worked pretty well significantly worse in three major ways.

  • JLawson

    They’re talented that way, Jim M!
    And besides – what’s the beef? Doesn’t EVERYONE get $174k per year like a senator does? Doesn’t EVERYONE have investments and other goodies bumping up their pay so they can live comfortably?

    Compared to that – $6500/year is chump change!

    (And we – sadly – are the chumps!)

  • SCSIwuzzy

    Roy,
    Eye-tal-ians are not a race.

  • Zelsdorf Ragshaft III

    I know this is off topic, but guess where Mantis ended up? Outside the Beltway. Same dude, different location. He fits in well there.

  • Nine Fourteen

    Once BarryCare gets its hooks in you, you’ll wish you were dead.

  • Jim Addison

    The question is NOT whether the $325-768 monthly premiums for someone with a preexisting condition is a “good deal” or not – because that’s not the limit of their expense, it doesn’t cover all their costs.

    But seriously, was there EVER anyone who thought federal bureaucrats could design a more efficient health care system than the free market? Excluding bureaucrats, idiots, Democrats, and socialists, of course, and with apologies for the serial redundancy . . .

  • JLawson

    As a 23-year veteran, Jim – I didn’t think so from the outset.

    The military health care system for active duty is effective in treating a self-selected pre-screened cohort for a limited period of time. Pre-screened? Sure – if you don’t pass the entrance physical then you’re not in, therefore you’re not covered. Simple, no?

    And they excel at trauma care – it is, after all, their job to inflict trauma. Other care? Dental, mental health, some vision. They provide pediatric care, they provide care for spouses, and pharmacy services.

    I was single during my active duty time (10 years) so I can’t say how good the pediatric or spousal care was – but I heard stories and they weren’t terribly complimentary. The usual problem was not enough doctors (military folks came first – active, then reservists, then retired, then spouses) and as such the wait times were legendary.

    In the late ’70s I wanted to get those newfangled soft contacts. I quickly got an appointment with the base optometrist – for a slot 3 months down the line for the initial examp. It was six weeks after that for the things to be delivered, and I had to pay out of pocket for them. (Of course, they weren’t issue items and my job didn’t require them.)

    Dental was the same – you had your yearly exam, and they scheduled you for whatever corrective work you needed at that point. You could, I suppose, get orthodontic services, but that wasn’t an issue for me.

    We weren’t at a small base or remote installation either – it was a good-sized one.

    So whenever someone suggests the military health care model – I just laugh. It wasn’t bad – but there’s no extensive pediatric care, no extensive cardiac care, no extensive geriatric care, little to no oncology care and treatment. Things might have changed considerably since my active duty time – but I didn’t see much indication of same during my reserve time.

    To recap – there’s a lot of difference between taking care of 2-3 million selected, screened, fit and relatively healthy people in a certain age group, and 300 million folks of all ages and conditions. I don’t think anyone pushing government health care and pointing at the military as a model of how well it works really has a clue of what they’re talking about.

  • Oyster

    Dane, do some research yourself before you go flying off the handle. Have you read the plan? Can you tell me exaclty what procedures or care is covered and what’s not? What prescriptions are covered? What’s the availability of doctors who accept the insurance?

    “Seriously – You think $325 a month is expensive for someone with pre-existing conditions????”

    Is that all you got???? (Wow, extra question marks are great!)

    Seriously, leave the knee-jerk reactionary stuff to the pros at Kos or HuffPo.

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