Obama's oil commission report: "about ideology and politics as much as it about facts"

We’ve chronicled Obama’s war on the oil industry and its effects on those the left deem to champion.  The effects being wrought on the economy are also growing and with the release of Obama’s duplicitous oil commission report (while all eyes were on Tucson), things are likely to get much worse if he and his minions have their way:

In life, facts constitute reality, and perceptions are negotiable. The reverse seems to be true in politics. And the conclusion of President Obama’s National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and Offshore Drilling exemplifies that observation.

In the commission’s report made public Tuesday, conflicting notions are revealed that represent a textbook example of cognitive dissonance. In theory, this condition provides a motivational drive for individuals to change conflicting (aka “faulty”) attitudes, beliefs or actions. However, people can also alleviate dissonance by justifying and blaming, a method employed by politicians all too often.

On the one hand, the commission faults BP and its contractors for the April 20, 2010, explosion, citing “incredible incompetence” in at least nine specific decisions, most of which “can be traced back to a single overarching failure, a failure of management.”

Commission members then use BP’s bad decisions to claim “systemic failures” on the part of the entire petroleum industry. Yet, these are two irreconcilable positions. The fatal flaws individuals committed on the Macondo well stand out because they so starkly contrast with the standards and processes to which those in the industry on other wells so rigorously adhere.

In other words, the commission’s report is about ideology and politics as much as it is about facts.

Obama’s panel fails to reconcile its broad conclusions about all firms in our offshore exploration sector and the fact that between 1969 and last spring operators drilled more than 50,000 offshore wells without a serious production accident.

Though opponents attempt to trivialize the successful track record by noting firms have drilled only 43 deep-water wells in the Gulf, the figure grows to more than 14,000 when including deep-water projects around the globe.

These facts are further evidence that BP’s Deepwater Horizon disaster stands as an exception rather than a rule.

I filled up yesterday and paid $3.13 per gallon, the pump actually shutting down when my total hit $75 despite not having quite filled my tank. What should instead be shut down is Obama’s attempt to shutter the oil industry, an attempt steeped in deceit and purposed in furthering an extremist agenda.

If the Republicans don’t start fighting back and soon, Americans will boot them out of office as quickly as they did the Democrats in November.  And rightly so.  They ought to be using this commission’s whitewashing of BP’s culpability as a springboard to attack the whole of his fossil fuel policies and as a means to actually do something about lowering the unemployment numbers in this country.

The opportunity is golden.  What in hell are they waiting on?

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Posted by on January 14, 2011.
Filed under Barack Obama, BP Oil Spill, Employment, Meme Watch, Oil.
I blog more regularly at my own place where plain thoughts are delivered roughly. My about page gives you more on who I am.

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  • Jeff

    want some cheese with that whine ???

    I want it now … wahhh …

    for gods sake, the report just got released and you expect the House to hold hearings tomorrow …

    grow up, you are starting to sound like Daily Kos …

  • JLawson

    It’s never made sense to me how we ignore the resources we have to shovel money overseas to people who ostensibly hate us. (Cut off the money, and we’ll see how much they like us.)

    Wouldn’t it be better to keep $100/bbl here stateside, paying it to companies pulling oil out of the Gulf, or off the coasts? Think about California – loads of oil off the coast and the state government ignoring it. The revenue it could produce for that state would go a long way to getting it out of the financial mess it’s in.

    I swear, it’s like they want the country to go bankrupt or something.

  • JLawson

    “for gods sake, the report just got released and you expect the House to hold hearings tomorrow …”

    Jeff, this isn’t something that occured overnight – it’s been coming on for a long time. When gas got to $5/gallon, the Dems blocked new drilling because ‘it would take too long to make a difference’. Well, here it is several years later. We’ve got some oil coming from the new Bakken oil fields in South Dakota – but drilling in the Gulf is pretty well stopped, and likely won’t be back for years.

    We’re energy-dependent – and undersupplied. We’ve got dreamers in Washington who believe solar and windmills can supply our needs – ignoring just how MUCH we need and how little energy we’re getting for a tremendous expense in government subsidies. They’re betting a shitload of our money on a long-term win with pretty poor odds, and ignoring what we need right now.

  • Oyster

    This report’s main purpose is to deflect attention from the fed’s slow response after the disaster and the decisions made thereafter. One of those decisions was to turn down offers of help from other countries that would mitigate the damage and another was holding up operation of skimmers to inspect for things like life preservers. Third was the knee-jerk moratorium which exacerbated the unemployment situation.

    The situation need not have been as disasterous after the blowout. But if it had been handled wih more competence they couldn’t use the crisis to push their agenda. How convenient for this admin.

    There was a huge conflict in the admin’s statements during the crisis too. On the one hand BP “wasn’t doing enough” and on the other BP was acting at the administration’s “sole discretion”.

    Instead, all we get is more finger-pointing.

  • JLawson

    Oyster -

    We’ve got a government afraid to do anything, paralyzed by fear of making a mistake or taking criticism. If we open up drilling, the eco-nuts will go ballistic. If we don’t, then they’ll be quiet and all they’ll have to deal with is the uncomfortable low complaints of the mass of citizens.

    Our ‘leaders’ respond to the loudest voices. We who have to deal with $3, $4, $5 a gallon gas – we’re placated with ‘We’re doing everything we can to address the problem, but it’s going to take 5 years to get domestic oil on line.’ And they don’t tell you that 4 of those years are chewed up by paperwork and appeals and permit reviews and the like.

    Our bureaucracy is choking the country, and their answer is more regulation. Something’s got to give.

  • GarandFan

    Of course GOVERNMENT INSPECTORS weren’t at fault! It’s not like they didn’t do their job. After all, they partied with those they were supposed to oversee on many occasions.

    What we need are MORE laws!

    So predictable. So pathetic!

  • 914

    THROW ALL THE BUMS OUT!! who needs them?