Good Riddance!

The citizens of North Korea have received an early Christmas gift. Kim Jong Il is now Kim Jong Dead. What next for North Korea?

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  • http://twitter.com/Stan25c Stan Brewer

    Fearless Leader finally decided it was time to take a dirt nap. Well good riddance to bad rubbish.

  • herddog505

    We can hope that what’s next for North Korea is the beginnings of liberty.

    I fear, however, that they will merely get another “dear leader”… or even civil war.

    How DO the people of Seoul sleep at night???

    • Anonymous

      There’s always the chance Dear Son will just say, “to hell with this,” pack up the Courvoisier, and run off to Ibiza.

      • http://www.rustedsky.net Anonymous

        That would likely be the best possible scenario with that family.  Of course, that would leave the country in the hands of the generals… which are an unknown quantity at this point.  (Cult of personality dictatorships aside, you’ve got to wonder just how much aiding and abetting was going on by the military, and how much of the repression was started and fostered BY the military, with the Kims going along for the ride.)

        Of course, it COULD be possible that the new Kim goes “Screw this juche ideology crap – let’s get surveyors in, find out what sort of resources we’ve got, and get ourselves up to the late 20th century technology-wise.”  Start with fertilizers and farm machinery, then infrastructure and cell-phones… and within 9 months there will be people in the West complaining bitterly how the pure society of NK has been ‘spoiled’ by Western encroachment… while the folks there are enjoying their first good harvest in decades.

        • herddog505

          I can’t see that happening: too many of the top hoodlums in the government don’t want the gravy train (such as it is) to stop and the hangings from lampposts to begin.

          Further, think about how frightening a non-regimented society – freedom – must be to people unaccustomed to it.  We see this to some extent in the left here at home and in Europe, and saw a good bit of it in Russia where the communist party, despite its clear history of inefficiency, repression and murder is STILL preferred by a significant fraction of Russians.

          • http://www.rustedsky.net Anonymous

            Yes and no – looks like Putin’s not quite so popular as he used to be.

            Freedom is a heady wine that leaves an initial hangover to those not used to it – but after the hangover subsides the benefits are obvious over a centrally-planned society.

          • herddog505

            Tell that to the dems.  Hell, tell that to virtually every elected politician and bureaucrat in the United States, Canada, Western Europe, Japan, and the rest of the world.

            I don’t disagree myself, you understand, but there are PLENTY of people for whom freedom is a very uncomfortable concept and the command economy is OBVIOUSLY better than the free market because – dang it! – people just aren’t smart enough and wise enough to make the right decisions about their own money.

      • Anonymous

        Chico, my luck doesn’t run that way. But I’ll keep a good thought for your idea.

        Since they’ve already had a “Great Leader” and a “Dear Leader” how about they call this one the Manchester Union Leader? Sorry, JT.

  • Anonymous

    So how long before the hardliners take Kim’s Chosen One out back and shoot him in the back of the head?

    • http://www.rustedsky.net Anonymous

      Depends on how useful they see him.  If there’s a great deal of percieved utility, then he’ll be fine.  If not, “Dang, the stress of trying to live up to his late parent killed him.”

      If I were him, I’d pack up a few billion bucks and a change of socks and run like hell, maybe request asylum in the US or Australia.

  • Anonymous

    It will not be a surprise if the next “leader” speaks very good Mandarin.  The Chinese are none too happy about the NK refugee situation even now.  If what passes for “civil order” breaks down in post Kim Jong Il the long border with China will present China with its own “civil order” problem.  It seems likely, therefore, that the near term resolution of the leadership question and their near term domestic/foreign policies will be massively influenced by the CCP.  An NK transition to a China-lite structure of strict one party rule under an open economy is probably a preferred option of the Chinese.

  • Anonymous

    Matt Damon!

  • Anonymous

    Kim Jong Ill  ———> Kim Jong Dead

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    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      “Spam”

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