New York Times blogger spreads false story about Romney

Fact checkers at the New York Times need to get busy, because the NYT blog “The Caucus” has make a whopper of a false claim about GOP presidential contender Mitt Romney.

Here is what NYT blogger Michael D. Shear wrote:

In New Hampshire, Mr. Romney provided openings by saying he could relate to people who receive pink slips, and later letting the words “I like to fire people” come out of his mouth. Both were quickly seized on by his rivals.

Romney did not say that he likes to fire people. He said that he likes to be able to fire people.

Romney was talking about his ability to choose who provides him with a service such as health insurance. Like any sane person, Romney does not want to be stuck with an insurance company that provides him with lousy service. So, Romney likes to choose who he gets health insurance from.  In short, Romney is pro-choice when it comes to health insurance.

Anyone who listened to (or read) Romney’s comments knows what Romney actually said. Apparently, Shear didn’t listen or read.  If Shear’s readers didn’t listen or read, either, then they wouldn’t know that the Shear has made a false statement.

Will the New York Times publish a correction? Only time will tell.

Shortlink:

Posted by on January 17, 2012.
Filed under 2008 Presidential Race, Bloggers, Blogging Matters, Mitt Romney, New York Times.
A refugee from Planet Melmac masquerading as a human. Loves cats*. In fair condition. A fixer-upper. Warranty still good. Not necessarily sane. [*Joke in reference to the TV sit-com "Alf", which featured a space alien who liked to eat cats. Disclaimer: No cats were harmed in the writing and posting of this profile.]

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  • jim_m

    Don’t expect any correction.  Despite the many editors who are there, they claim, to ensure accuracy, like other leftists, they are not interested in the truth.  They are only interested in holding power. 

    Dowdification of conservative statements to yield fraudulent and misleading quotes is seemingly official editorial policy of the New York Slimes.

  • herddog505

    I often wonder how many things we take as historical fact (“everybody knows”) are such simply because the right (or wrong) people wrote the history.

    • jim_m

      Best example of that is the belief that Europeans in the age of Columbus thought that the Earth was flat. This is false.  Man has known that the Earth is round since the time of the ancient Greeks at the very least.  We hold this erroneous belief because Washington Irving put it in as a plot device in his serialized biography of Christopher Columbus. 

      I find it humorous that lefties like to compare conservatives to “Flat earthers” who never existed, thus they demonstrate their own ignorance inmaking a reference that is completely idiotic.

      • herddog505

        It’s more than a question of people having a misconception: it’s the outright falsification / fabrication of history.  I often thought about this when I wrote history papers in college: “I’m reading contemporary newspaper accounts, diaries, etc.  Were these people relating actual fact?  What they honestly BELIEVED to be true?  What they WANTED to be true?  What somebody else told them was true?”

        A couple of examples leap to mind:

        — The infamous “reports” about Stalinist Russia by the NYT’s Walter Duranty.  What if they had not been debunked?  Would (more) people believe that the USSR was the paradise that he portrayed?

        — What norkies apparently believe about the Kim family.

        These aren’t instances of ignorant people simply getting something wrong: they are cases of people being DELIBERATELY misled; they believe that the fabrications are true and can point to documented “evidence” to support their beliefs.  It’s really Orwellian.

        • Gmacr1

          In the case of the NorKs its a matter of survival. Don’t belive the dogma, get re-educated in a lovely re-education center.

    • jim_m

      Duplicate post

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      Historians are, in my estimation, far more likely to get the facts right than the press is.

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      I seem to be having one of those days…

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      Two of those days.

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      Three of those days

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      Four of those days.

    • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

      Five of those days, and I refuse to blame the tool.

  • http://twitter.com/Bruce_MacMahon Bruce MacMahon

    The Caucus Blog must be where the NYT sends all its writers who are simply too biased to bash Republicans responsibly in the actual newspaper.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_R7FMXY3DZP7JF7SGSPIOSLLXNE Stephen

    He thinks corporations are people — and he thinks people are expendable.

    He likes to fire people. It’s what vulture capitalists like Romney do for a living.

    • jim_m

      Um,  He thinks corporations are people because he knows that for legal purposes hey are considered like people, so he is right and you are an idiot.  Also I like to be able to fire people that work for me like my doctor, my investment counselor, my Congressman, etc.  He was speaking in those terms and once again you prove you are an idiot.

      • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/EU5DQWQTTHTPO4A4ZYSL3AAV2U Adjoran

        Not to imply that Stephen is NOT an idiot, but his motivation is simply normal leftist dishonesty.  Even a pinhead like him understands the words were taken out of context in the “fire people” quote, although he probably doesn’t understand the finer points of why we have corporations in the first place, having evidently majored in Diversity Studies.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

        Oh, come on. Even those who don’t think corporations should legally be treated as people, know corporations are treated that way. That’s the whole point of what they’re complaining about!

        The obvious point of the question is “SHOULD corporations BE treated as people?” In this context, Romney’s answer is evasive at best, and you know it.

    • http://www.pohdiaries.com/ TWB

      I’m confused Stephen. I thought all of you libs believed in evolution? You know, survival of the fittest and all that.

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

        With evolution, people also survive as groups. In fact cooperation is just as important as competition. Else we would all be lone wolves instead of wolfpacks. (Cf. “The Hangover”)

    • http://www.wizbangblog.com David Robertson

      Stephen, you are entitled to your own set of opinions, but you are not entitled to your own set of facts. I watched a video clip of what Romney said. He said that he likes having the ability to fire people. That is different than saying, “I like to fire people,” which Romney clearly did not say. Having the ability means having a choice, and Romney likes having a choice. Gee, is being pro-choice wrong when it isn’t applied to abortion?

      • SteveCrickmore075

        The New Times story is  very small potatoes, next  to Mitt Romney.  As far habitual lying, Romney leaves all politicians, in his shade. It is so common and pervasive, it may escape your notice. Two examples “I’m Mitt Romney, and yes, Wolf, that’s also my first name.” In fact, Willard is his first name. It’s a lie notable for being so mundane: Why would someone fudge their name? It’s almost as if he can’t control himself.  Then, Romney (at the South Carolina debate):
         
        “We’ve got a president in office three years, and he does not have a jobs plan yet. I’ve got one out there already and I’m not even president, yet.”
         

        Obama delivered a speech to a (rare) joint session of Congress just four months ago, (remember, in September entirely devoted to presenting) a jobs plan. The whole thing has been online ever since. It’s been scrutinized, analyzed, and subjected to CBO scoring. It’s been debated; it’s been the subject of advertising; and it’s been voted on in the Senate.
         
        .And this, our Media Village overlords assure us, is the best of the available Republican candidates.

        • Jwb10001

          well a jobs plan that creates no jobs and can’t get past the democrat controlled senate isn’t really a jobs plan is it?

          • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

            Um, yes it is.

            Otherwise Romney’s plan couldn’t be considered a plan unless he got into the White House and THEN passed it.

          • SteveCrickmore075

            The New Times story is  very small potatoes, next  to Mitt Romney.  As far habitual lying, Romney leaves all politicians, in his shade. It is so common and pervasive, it may escape your notice. One example,   Romney (at the South Carolina debate):
             
            “We’ve got a president in office three years, and he does not have a jobs plan yet. I’ve got one out there already and I’m not even president, yet.”
             

            /Obama delivered a speech to a (rare) joint session of Congress just four months ago, (remember In September) and at the time, ( entirely devoted  to presenting) a jobs plan. The whole thing has been online ever since. It’s been scrutinized, analyzed, and subjected to CBO scoring. It’s been debated; it’s been the subject of advertising; and it’s been voted on in the Senate.
             
            .And this, our Media Village overlords assure us, is the best of the available Republican candidates.

    • iwogisdead

      If I had been a stockholder of one of these companies that Romney’s business acquired, or if my 401k had been invested in one of these companies (as many of the employees of the companies surely must have been), I’d have been delighted to have Romney’s business come in and buy the stock of an underperforming and badly managed business at a premium to the market value of the stock.

      • JaxinBotox

        For a few months, until the company was so under pressure from the heavy load of debt Romney put it under that you would be lucky to get tenths of a percent pay increases year over year. The stock eventually tanked to $0.01, and they then laid you off. Then I am sure you would be dancing in the streets arguing to have the man be promoted to President, so he could bring that prosperity to the whole country!

        • Bob Gilkison

          Oh BS.

            I was an employee of a company that Bain provided the seed money to start.  If it had not been for Bain, there would have been no company, and hundreds of jobs would never have existed.  We had dozens of pilots, mechanics, flight attendants, etc. working for us who came from bankrupt airlines around the country.  Some came to Virginia from as far as Alaska, because Bain’s willingness to risk an investment created jobs.

          Do not demonize what you do not understand.

          • JaxinBotox

            Yeah for you. I have already said in many other places that Bain does great things for some. For others they do thing that leave them incapable of survival.

            My god, he is such a nice man, out of the thousands of people he met he only killed 1. He is the most awesome human alive!

  • ackwired

    Honesty is a very rare commodity in political dialogue.

    • http://profiles.yahoo.com/u/EU5DQWQTTHTPO4A4ZYSL3AAV2U Adjoran

      We appreciate your confession, if not your projection.

      • http://wizbangblog.com/author/rodney-graves/ Rodney G. Graves

        Damn you’re good with that knife!

      • ackwired

        How nice.

        ________________________________
        From: Disqus
        To: ackwired@yahoo.com
        Sent: Tuesday, January 17, 2012 6:46 PM
        Subject: [wizbang] Re: New York Times blogger spreads false story about Romney
        Disqus generic email template

        Adjoran wrote, in response to ackwired:
        We appreciate your confession, if not your projection.
        Link to comment

      • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

        Try that in a mirror. It might be enlightening.

  • JaxinBotox

    Romney likes the ability to choose his health insurance provider, but then again, his action in Massachusetts took that ability away from many people when certain companies either went bankrupt or left Massachusetts because it was not financially possible to provide the coverage for the price that Massachusetts forced them to sell at.
    Remember, Romney is a man who thought that 900% returns on short term investments were a good thing and the epitome of capitalism. But when an insurance company makes 3% to 6% returns, he is willing to use the power of government to step in and shut them down for being so greedy.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

    So a NY Times blogger said something technically inaccurate. You’re right, it should be corrected.

    You’re also going to correct ANY inaccurate facts posted in your blog as soon as someone points them out to you, right?

    Because we all believe in factual accuracy, regardless of the source. Right?

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_425GVKQCLFZMQYYENR7CJBRDVA jb

      How odd that there is no reply to this very reasonable proposition – that errors in blogs be voluntarily corrected as soon as they’re pointed out and verified.

      Very interesting.