“Recent prosecutions seem to have everything to do with administrative secrecy and very little to do with national security”

The New York Times, yes, that New York Times, with what some might call a hit piece on Obama.  

Seriously:

Ny-times-obamaThe Obama administration, which promised during its transition to power that it would enhance “whistle-blower laws to protect federal workers,” has been more prone than any administration in history in trying to silence and prosecute federal workers.

The Espionage Act, enacted back in 1917 to punish those who gave aid to our enemies, was used three times in all the prior administrations to bring cases against government officials accused of providing classified information to the media. It has been used six times since the current president took office.

Setting aside the case of Pfc. Bradley Manning, an Army intelligence analyst who is accused of stealing thousands of secret documents, the majority of the recent prosecutions seem to have everything to do with administrative secrecy and very little to do with national security.

In case after case, the Espionage Act has been deployed as a kind of ad hoc Official Secrets Act, which is not a law that has ever found traction in America, a place where the people’s right to know is viewed as superseding the government’s right to hide its business.

In the most recent case, John Kiriakou, a former C.I.A. officer who became a Democratic staff member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, was charged under the Espionage Act with leaking information to journalists about other C.I.A. officers, some of whom were involved in the agency’s interrogation program, which includedwaterboarding.

For those of you keeping score, none of the individuals who engaged in or authorized the waterboarding of terror suspects have been prosecuted, but Mr. Kiriakou is in federal cross hairs, accused of talking to journalists and news organizations, including The New York Times.

Mr. Tapper said that he had not planned on raising the issue, but hearing Mr. Carney echo the praise for reporters who dug deep to bring out the truth elsewhere got his attention.

“I have been following all of these case, and it’s not like they are instances of government employees leaking the location of secret nuclear sites,” Mr. Tapper said. “These are classic whistle-blower cases that dealt with questionable behavior by government officials or its agents acting in the name of protecting America.”

Mr. Carney said in the briefing that he felt it was appropriate “to honor and praise the bravery” of Ms. Colvin and Mr. Shadid, but he did not really engage Mr. Tapper’s broader question, saying he could not go into information about specific cases. He did not respond to an e-mail message seeking comment.

There’s more and it’s… surprising.

When Obama is receiving this kind of press, from the Gray Lady no less, then there’s trouble a’brewing.

Get the popcorn.  This ought to get good.

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Posted by on February 27, 2012.
Filed under Barack Obama, New York Times.
I blog more regularly at my own place where plain thoughts are delivered roughly. My about page gives you more on who I am.

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  • GarandFan

    Evidently The One has displeased Sulzberger in some manner.

  • Hank_M

    Ageed, Garandfan.

    As for National Security….I’m hard pressed to come up with anything Obama has done in the interests of National security. Even his apologies aren’t working anymore.

  • 914

    With Barry on your side, who needs enemies..?

  • EricSteel

    “When Obama is receiving this kind of press, from the Gray Lady no less, then there’s trouble a’brewing.”
     
    I suggest not holding your breath.  This is the kind of story that the media writes and then points to in order to say “see we’re not biased, we hold Democrat’s feet to the fire too.”  The difference being that this is a single article in the back pages of the paper and quickly forgotten.  Whereas if this were a Republican, it would be front page headline news for weeks with multiple news organizations taking up the story.

  • SoBeRight

    More proof that Obama is to the right of the New York Times.

     

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_W6UJJOM4PP4XLSBG6N4LROVSQE Retired Military

      Stephen

      That isnt saying a whole lot.

  • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_W6UJJOM4PP4XLSBG6N4LROVSQE Retired Military

    “Recent prosecutions seem to have everything to do with administrative secrecy and very little to do with national security”

    This suprises anyone how?  In other news today the sun rose, water is wet and the sky is blue.

  • LiberalNitemare

    http://www.whitehouse.gov/the_press_office/TransparencyandOpenGovernment

    SUBJECT:      Transparency and Open Government

    My Administration is committed to creating an unprecedented level of
    openness in Government.  We will work together to ensure the public
    trust and establish a system of transparency, public participation, and
    collaboration. Openness will strengthen our democracy and promote
    efficiency and effectiveness in Government.
     

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100000067496695 Ron Hollis

       Transparent… definitely! We thinking people can see right through this admin’s agenda.

  • http://otisthehand.blogspot.com/ OTIS the hand

    a former C.I.A. officer who became a Democratic staff member on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, was charged under the Espionage Act with
    leaking information to journalists about other C.I.A. officers,
    some of
    whom were involved in the agency’s interrogation program, which
    included waterboarding.”

    Am I the only one here who thinks that CIA officers leaking information about other officers to the press are total dirtbags who deserve to be hammered? Perhaps if their fellow officers are breaking the law in some way I could see it. But that does not seem to be the case. In any event, if CIA officers are breaking the law, aren’t there appropriate channels, other than the NYT propaganda rag,  to deal with that? It is called “classified information” for a reason. I am not sympathetic, and I do not agree with the euphemistic use of the term “whistleblower” in describing them. I would think that such actions are a betrayal of these officers oaths.

    “…none of the individuals who engaged in or authorized the waterboarding of terror suspects have been prosecuted”

    That’s because they were acting within the law.

  • Commander_Chico

    I’m surprised that Wizbang is defending Bradley Manning and Kirakou.  Manning in particular leaked tons of classified material and was subject to military orders at the time he did so. 

    There have been some questionable whistleblower cases under Obama, Manning is not one of them.

    It just shows you how extreme partisanship makes the world turn round here.  If Bush were still president, you’d be demanding the death penalty.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_IZ5BM5GNLA54OADSWGSXAMA7SY Jay

      No… People apologized for Bush.  Although I’m interested how they’re going to take the Stratfor leaks that say the US is going to prosecute Assange without the link with Manning.

  • Oysteria

    Chico, that was completely disingenuous.  Who here defended Manning or Kirakou?  Maybe you should go back and read all that’s been said here about Manning, in particular, in the past.