Lance Armstrong Gives Up Fight On Doping Charges, To Be Stripped Of All Tour De France Titles

From The New York Times:

After more than a decade of outrunning accusations that he had doped during his celebrated cycling career, Lance Armstrong, one of the most well-known and accomplished athletes in history, finally surrendered on Thursday, etching a dark mark on his legacy by ending his fight against charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs.

Armstrong, who won the Tour de France an unprecedented seven straight times, said on Thursday night that he would not continue to contest the charges levied against him by the United States Anti-Doping Agency, which contended that he doped and was one of the ringleaders of systematic doping on his Tour-winning teams.

…Armstrong’s decision, according to the World Anti-Doping Code, means he will be stripped of his seven Tour titles, the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Olympics and all other titles, awards and money he won from August 1998 forward. It also means he will be barred for life from competing, coaching or having any official role with any Olympic sport or other sport that follows the World Anti-Doping Code.

It also means he will be barred for life from competing, coaching or having any official role with any Olympic sport or other sport that follows the World Anti-Doping Code. “It’s a sad day for all of us who love sport and our athletic heroes,” Travis Tygart, chief executive of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, said. “It’s yet another heartbreaking example of how the win-at-all-costs culture, if left unchecked, will overtake fair, safe and honest competition.”

The USADA’s case against Armstrong does not rely on any positive drug test, but rather is a circumstantial case based on testimony of other riders and associates. By not contesting the charges Armstrong apparently hopes to avoid the circus-like atmosphere an arbitration hearing would surely entail and stand on his record of passing hundreds of tests.

Lance Armstrong issued the following statement:

“There comes a point in every man’s life when he has to say, “Enough is enough.” For me, that time is now. I have been dealing with claims that I cheated and had an unfair advantage in winning my seven Tours since 1999. Over the past three years, I have been subjected to a two-year federal criminal investigation followed by Travis Tygart’s unconstitutional witch hunt. The toll this has taken on my family, and my work for our foundation and on me leads me to where I am today – finished with this nonsense.

I had hoped that a federal court would stop USADA’s charade. Although the court was sympathetic to my concerns and recognized the many improprieties and deficiencies in USADA’s motives, its conduct, and its process, the court ultimately decided that it could not intervene.

If I thought for one moment that by participating in USADA’s process, I could confront these allegations in a fair setting and – once and for all – put these charges to rest, I would jump at the chance. But I refuse to participate in a process that is so one-sided and unfair. Regardless of what Travis Tygart says, there is zero physical evidence to support his outlandish and heinous claims. The only physical evidence here is the hundreds of controls I have passed with flying colors. I made myself available around the clock and around the world. In-competition. Out of competition. Blood. Urine. Whatever they asked for I provided. What is the point of all this testing if, in the end, USADA will not stand by it?

From the beginning, however, this investigation has not been about learning the truth or cleaning up cycling, but about punishing me at all costs. I am a retired cyclist, yet USADA has lodged charges over 17 years old despite its own 8-year limitation. As respected organizations such as UCI and USA Cycling have made clear, USADA lacks jurisdiction even to bring these charges. The international bodies governing cycling have ordered USADA to stop, have given notice that no one should participate in USADA’s improper proceedings, and have made it clear the pronouncements by USADA that it has banned people for life or stripped them of their accomplishments are made without authority. And as many others, including USADA’s own arbitrators, have found, there is nothing even remotely fair about its process. USADA has broken the law, turned its back on its own rules, and stiff-armed those who have tried to persuade USADA to honor its obligations. At every turn, USADA has played the role of a bully, threatening everyone in its way and challenging the good faith of anyone who questions its motives or its methods, all at U.S. taxpayers’ expense. For the last two months, USADA has endlessly repeated the mantra that there should be a single set of rules, applicable to all, but they have arrogantly refused to practice what they preach. On top of all that, USADA has allegedly made deals with other riders that circumvent their own rules as long as they said I cheated. Many of those riders continue to race today.

The bottom line is I played by the rules that were put in place by the UCI, WADA and USADA when I raced. The idea that athletes can be convicted today without positive A and B samples, under the same rules and procedures that apply to athletes with positive tests, perverts the system and creates a process where any begrudged ex-teammate can open a USADA case out of spite or for personal gain or a cheating cyclist can cut a sweetheart deal for themselves. It’s an unfair approach, applied selectively, in opposition to all the rules. It’s just not right.

USADA cannot assert control of a professional international sport and attempt to strip my seven Tour de France titles. I know who won those seven Tours, my teammates know who won those seven Tours, and everyone I competed against knows who won those seven Tours. We all raced together. For three weeks over the same roads, the same mountains, and against all the weather and elements that we had to confront. There were no shortcuts, there was no special treatment. The same courses, the same rules. The toughest event in the world where the strongest man wins. Nobody can ever change that. Especially not Travis Tygart.

Today I turn the page. I will no longer address this issue, regardless of the circumstances. I will commit myself to the work I began before ever winning a single Tour de France title: serving people and families affected by cancer, especially those in underserved communities. This October, my Foundation will celebrate 15 years of service to cancer survivors and the milestone of raising nearly $500 million. We have a lot of work to do and I’m looking forward to an end to this pointless distraction. I have a responsibility to all those who have stepped forward to devote their time and energy to the cancer cause. I will not stop fighting for that mission. Going forward, I am going to devote myself to raising my five beautiful (and energetic) kids, fighting cancer, and attempting to be the fittest 40-year old on the planet.”

In this case the USADA seems to have taken every rumor or story about Armstrong over the years since he retired and given them official sanction. I’m not sure what the point of the USADA’s continued persecution of Armstrong served.

Armstrong is gambling that people have made up their mind whether he participates in the USADA’s show trial or not. Not participating leaves the story where it is today, with no “smoking gun.” For Armstrong that’s probably the best outcome he could hope for…

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  • 914

    he won fair and square.. enough already

  • Par4Course

    This is like the candidate who said President Obama led the raid on Usama Bin Laden. We know who led the raid and we know who won the Tour de France 7 times. For the USADA to rewrite history well after the fact, with no scientific evidence of doping, is the height of idiocy. Many of us will always consider Lance Armstrong one of the premier athletes of our lifetime regardless of the decisions of the [expletives deleted] people at USADA.

  • Vagabond661

    “What is the point of all this testing if, in the end, USADA will not stand by it?”
    Indeed. If the USADA doesn’t stand by their own rules, then it appears more like a personal vendetta.

  • Commander_Chico_Cognoscente

    This guy can afford lawyers. Lawyers do the work of contesting things like this. I do not understand why he is giving up if the case against him is weak and his accusers are liars.

    • mikegiles

      Because most people will get tired of being the object of a vendetta. And then there are those stupid people out there, who believe that it’s the business of the person accused, to prove the charges untrue as opposed to it being the business of the accuser to prove the charges have a basis in fact.

      • Commander_Chico_Cognoscente

        Yeah, right so you just surrender even though you’re right. Why isn’t he suing these accusers for defamation?

  • SteveCrickmore075

    “The only physical evidence here is the hundreds of controls I have passed with flying colors”. flying allright. Most of wizbang wants to believe Lance was setting these records on mineral water, but the physical evidence and personal testimony tell a completly different story.

    1995
    Lance and his Motorola teammates are disappointed with their results in continental Europe races. As team member Stephen Swart tells it, Lance offers the rest of his teammates advice. Advice includes things like ‘ride your bikes better and/or faster’ and ‘take EPO.’ “It was his words that pushed us toward doing it.” Swart says. “It was his advice, his discussions.”
    1999
    Following Stage 1 of the Tour de France, the first of Lance’s 7 wins, he tests positive for a corticosteroid. As far as I know, this fact in and of itself is not in dispute. Lance brings a note from his doctor saying he got saddle sores from riding his bike a lot. Corticosteroids help with saddle sores. Team masseuse Emma O’Reilly will eventually tell journalist David Walsh that this prescription was backdated and totally phony.
    2005
    One of Lance’s samples from the ’99 Tour is retested. It tests positive for EPO. They weren’t testing it to sanction him, though, it was just for fun.

    • http://www.shockandblog.com/ Jay McHue

      Laughable.

  • blogagog

    “For Armstrong that’s probably the best outcome he could hope for…”

    Why would you assume that? The best outcome he could hope for is complete exoneration. This is in fact one of the least desirable outcomes he could hope for.

    • http://www.shockandblog.com/ Jay McHue

      “The best outcome he could hope for is complete exoneration.”

      Given the circumstances, that outcome was not even on the table. It was completely impossible. These people had a scorched earth policy in place and one way or another, they were determined to strip Armstrong of everything he earned. There was no other end that was going to happen.

  • http://www.wizbangblog.com David Robertson

    Just what does Lance Armstrong do for a living, anyway?

  • Ken in Camarillo

    The proper solution is to choose rules that can be accurately enforced, to remove the possibility of cheating and getting away with it. If certain undesirable practices cannot be accurately detected, remove the prohibitions against them. If all the remaining prohibitions can be accurately detected, then it becomes too risky to cheat, and fewer will try.

    When detection is unreliable, the number of cheaters will increase, and even those who don’t want to cheat are pressured by the desire to compete on even terms. It creates a mess and erodes the credibility of those enforcing the rules. Catching a few while most know that so many others are also cheating adds to the erosion of credibility.

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