Thoughts on the election

In no particular order, here are my thoughts and reactions from tonight’s election.

First off though, I must admit that as closely as our current economy and national mood paralleled 1976 – 1980, I expected a Romney victory.  Throw in the shellacking that Democrats took in 2010, and we should have seen a clear Republican domination.  What went wrong?  There’s no denying that Republicans sent a clear signal that if they took control of Congress and/or the White House, we would be in for a very long series of fights over Obamacare, the budget, Medicare/Social Security, energy policy, etc.  As I look at the defeat of Alan West in Florida, I have to wonder if the American people are less interested in “fighters” and more interested in Congressmen who canactually agree on something, or at least pretend to be working together.

The Democrats showed that they are masters at finding seemingly outrageous comments by Republicans, creating faux controversies from those statements, and then playing them up in the press for all they are worth.  It’s going to be hard for Republicans to avoid “macaca moments” when the press takes such delight in making them the central issue in campaigns, but they are going to have to do a better job of it.

State referendums seem to indicate that Americans want less Obamacare, and more marijuana.  Interesting.

Barack Obama will probably win with a popular vote margin of around 0.5% to 1%.  Hardly a mandate.  Hardly vote of confidence.  And nothing about the balance of power in DC has changed – Republicans control the House, Democrats control the Senate and the White House.  Maybe this is what the American people as a whole want; essentially a stalemate where nothing too radical gets accomplished, yet massive destruction of the previous Congress’s work is also impossible.   As I think about it, a massive dismantling of major bills signed into law during the last four years would likely have caused as many problems as it would have solved.  To cite an obvious example, the Republicans never really gave us a clear picture of how they would dismantle or repeal Obamacare while leaving its more popular benefits (e.g. the elimination of pre-existing conditions as an underwriting criterion) in place.   Alinsky himself taught that if you are going to take apart a system, the people have to be convinced that you will help them replace it with something better.   He was probably right.

Obama now owns everything, especially the economy.  It was, unsurprisingly, the top concern of voters as measured by exit polls.  By the time 2014 rolls around, there will be no more tolerance for what he “inherited.”  And there will be accountability for the effects of his legislation and the regulatory policies of agencies under the control of his Administration.  Unfortunately the economy has suffered the most under this Administration.  We have seen nothing from President Obama in the way of plans to reinvigorate the private sector and get companies moving away from profit-taking and survival mode planning, and toward real growth.  What we have seen is a trillion dollars wasted on government subsidies and programs that have utterly failed to stimulate the economy.  2014 will be another very cruel mid-term year if the dire predictions surrounding Taxmageddon and the full implementation of Obamacare indeed come true.

Finally, ballot initiatives to grant marriage equality to same sex couples passed in Maine, Maryland, and Washington.  The approval of marriage equality in three very blue states that are largely devoid of Evangelicals is not exactly an earth shattering event.  But it does indicate that change may be on the horizon.  However, I believe that such change will be largely dependent on how those ballot measures are implemented.  If radical gay rights activists try to use those measures to punish churches and conservative groups via public smear campaigns and lawsuits, it will have been a Pyrrhic victory at best.

We need to remember that gay rights activists moved the goalposts for “tolerance” drastically during the last decade, by redefining the term solely in terms of marriage equality.  Twenty years ago, it wasn’t even an issue.  But today, regardless of what else you believe, if you do not support marriage equality, no questions asked, you are a hater, a bigot, a homophobe, etc.  Maybe the country is slowly turning around.  But if the intimidation, name-calling, and threats continue, it will be a long and nasty fight.  Gay rights leaders should have learned as much from the Chick-Fil-A uproar.  But I’m not holding my breath.

Oh, and there’s still Benghazi.  Richard Nixon won a landslide victory in 1972 after the Watergate break-in because his campaign was able to successfully spin alleged White House involvement into a trivial detail unworthy of being a major election year issue.  The deeper investigation that followed revealed an elaborate cover-up that went all the way to the Oval Office, and Nixon resigned in disgrace.  Today, four Americans are dead as a result of poor decisions based on extremely bad political calculations.  And not one Administration official has yet to tell us the whole truth.  There will be an investigation.  And Fast and Furious isn’t going away either.

As always I remain cautiously optimistic.  We’ll finally get to see first-hand how America would have fared if Jimmy Carter had been re-elected in 1980.  On a more serious note however, the anticipation and uncertainty over what lies ahead for the next four years is largely over.  Much of the hesitation on the part of private sector businesses has been based on that uncertainly.  It is my hope that businesses can finally get around to the task of planning for expansion and profitable growth.  Granted, this will be much more difficult for small to medium-sized businesses.  But I pray that they succeed, because if they don’t it will be a long and painful four years.

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Posted by on November 7, 2012.
Filed under 2012 Presidential Race, Barack Obama, Big government, Obama Regime.


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  • JWH

    The Democrats showed that they are masters at finding seemingly outrageous comments by Republicans, creating faux controversies from those statements, and then playing them up in the press for all they are worth.

    Those kinds of comments really were unforced errors. If a reporter, or even a supporter, shoves a microphone in a Republican’s face, he doesn’t have to sound off on pregnancy, rape, and abortion the way that Akin et. al. did.

  • herddog505

    I try to be optimistic. We survived The Late Unpleasantness, a couple of World Wars, the Cold War, and Carter.

    We’ll survive Barry.

    And, if I may wax cynical for a moment, it may be that the American people haven’t really, truly yet learned what the modern democrat party is, what it stands for, and what it intends. The mid-terms and that Barry had such a struggle this election indicates to me that many Americans have woken up, but many more either don’t get it or are fine with what the democrats have been up to. Had Mitt won last night, it would have been very easy to push the coming fiscal problems onto him, to make them HIS fault rather than Barry’s and the democrats’. As Michael Laprarie notes, it’s going to be harder and harder for Barry to keep claiming that he inherited everything.

    If the majority of our people HAVE “woken up”, if they are fine with Obamanomics and ObamaCare and his foreign and defense policies, then we are well on the road to becoming the United States of Greece: broke, powerless, and with a population of froward deadbeats with their hands perpetually out.

    • Laddie_Blah_Blah

      Ten million fewer voters cast their ballots for Obama in 2012 than in 2008. He fell below the vote totals for McCain and Palin 4 years ago. But Romney did not pick up any of the voters Obama lost, and did not even match Mac and Palin’s totals, even though he had Obama’s abysmal record to run against, whereas they did not.

      Obama did not win this election. Romney lost it.

      • Vagabond661

        The GOP lost it.

        • herddog505

          How?

          What did they do – or not do – that might have made things turn out differently? A few thoughts come to my mind:

          1. Different candidate. I have nothing personal against Mitt Romney: to the extent that MiniTru allowed us to learn that he’s anything other than a rapacious capitalist who bullied some hippie kid in his youth and made his dog ride on top of the car, he seems like a decent fellow. However, his politics did nothing to fire up the GOP base. I suggest that most Republicans didn’t vote for Mitt Romney: they voted for ABO. This, it seems to me, is not the best way to get independents and fence-crossers to turn out for your guy;

          2. Too much letting MiniTru call the shots. I’m not sure how to get around this, though I’m certain that the GOP needs to make damned sure that Candy Crowley and the other “moderators” never see a presidential debate again except as spectators;

          3. Less suggestion than question: was Romeny too nice and Ryan to whonky? Should they have come out swinging harder on the debt, Solyndra, Benghazi, etc? Or would MiniTru have turned this into “they’re just so MEAN and DIVISIVE?”

          The GOP always plays against a stacked deck; not sure how to get around that.

          • Vagabond661

            Romneyt turned out to be McCain lite. Another moderate who will work with Washington. Just like the media wanted us to be. But that is not what the populace wants.

            We want someone like Ryan who will go in and kick butt. The GOP will never go for that. They will keep putting up moderates like the media tells them to do and we will keep getting shellacked.

  • Commander_Chico

    Romney would have won if he picked Rubio. The mantra was “Latino vote in Nevada, Latino vote in Florida, Latino vote . . . ”

    Ryan sucked and his Medicare plan was one of the many millstones around Romney’s neck.

    • Rdmurphy42

      It’s all irrelevant. The American experiment has ended, as of November seventh, 2012.

    • GarandFan

      When ObamaCare falls apart of its own weight, we’ll find out. States are just beginning to find out that the ‘cost reductions’ is a myth.

    • jim_m

      I seem to recall your claiming that Rubio would have been a disaster, that he would turn off Hispanics because he was a faux cuban exile.

    • AndrewX

      Hey, CC, it’s your day, so have fun w/ it… I guess I’d be doing same if we had an adult voting population. But Ryan will be interesting to watch.

      Guess what – Now the Dems HAVE to come up with a feasable budget, which they have cynically (is there a word for cynically x 10?) refused to do for three years. Now they have to. And you know what? I think maybe the GOP has to relent on some tax issues and defense issues, risky though it may be: there is a price for losing. And if they really, painfully cave, that might, might take care of, oh, 20% of the problem. The other 80%, the only alternative being default? Well, Mr. Obama and Mr. Biden, ya wanted it, ya got it, we’re all ears.

      And when that day comes, waddya bet that a whole bunch of what that awful Paul Ryan has been saying will become the order of the day. You watch.

      • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

        What’d be funny is if Obama kicks out his advisers (who haven’t done him much good so far…) and calls up Ryan to take over from Geithner.

        At this point, Obama doesn’t have to worry about the markers and promised favors that got him into office. He CAN’T get elected again. His career path terminates in 4 years. He may owe a lot of folks a lot of stuff – but so what? He can stiff them, and what’ll they do? He’s politically untouchable at this point. He can dump everyone and get new faces and ideas in.

        It’ll be interesting to see if there’s any shifts in personnel. That’ll tell us a lot about what’s coming…

        • Vagabond661

          He certainly has more flexibilty now.

  • Rance Frayger

    When you compare Benghazi to Watergate you are ignoring one basic point: Nixon was guilty of covering up a felony that he and his staff planned and executed. Unless you can present evidence that Obama and his staff orchestrated the attack and killings, your comparison is weak.

    (Do you really get down on your knees and pray for the small to medium-sized businesses of America?)

  • Rdmurphy42

    Nothing will come of Benghazi. If Obama was videotaped shooting the ambassador himself, Harry Reid would refuse to move on it.

  • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

    Just goes to show – fear and division and a good political machine backed by a willing media can beat pretty much any reasoned and rational campaign.

    But – at this point Obama owns the results of the last 4 years, and the 4 years to come.

    4 years ago, I thought that while he wouldn’t be a stellar President, he’d be ‘good enough’. I haven’t thought so, apparently a lot of folks have thought otherwise.

    Now he’s got 4 more years to prove his ideas. We’ll see what happens – I fully expect a replay of the last 4 years. I’ll be very surprised if we’re actually in better shape in 4 years than we are now – but if we are, then I’ll be exceedingly glad to be wrong.

    • Hank_M

      “But – at this point Obama owns the results of the last 4 years, and the 4 years to come.”

      Regarding the next 4 years. I expect an all out assault against the House.
      Still Repub controlled and about to be blamed for everything.

      • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

        Most likely. They can’t point at any successes, so you’ve got to find a scapegoat somewhere.

  • Wild_Willie

    Always hard for a republican. Obama had to run against Romney. Romney had to run and Obama and the MSM. He did well. I pray we can hold it together another 4 years. ww

    • Commander_Chico

      The MSM helped Romney in the last days by making the race look closer than it actually was.

      Can anyone really complain about polling now?

    • Hugh_G

      Oh for Christ sake will you ever stop whining about the media and take responsibility for the weaknesses in your own party?

      Carville famously said “its the economy stupid.” Now it’s “demographics stupid.” Try taking a serious look at some exit polls. You might even learn something, though I doubt it.

  • arcman46

    The “felony” that the Obama administration is covering up is the “Fast and Furious” program, which was an act of war against an ally, to push gun control. Bengahzi was merely dereliction of duty. My Optimism is gone. I no longer have any faith left in the intelligence of the American people. Fool me once, shame on you; fool me twice, shame on me. Ryan is right, nothing will come of either scandal. We have a Senate majority leader who will continue to look the other way. We haven’t had a budget in over 1300 days. Obamacare is now an albatross around our neck that, like Social Security, we can never get rid of; 2 or our rising stars either did not get elected, or re-elected, and they both happen to be black. I can’t think of anything more disasterous that could have happened.

  • herddog505

    Some further thoughts:

    1. As with many past elections, there needs to be a reexamination of the polls. Further, there needs to be a reexamination of how we view polls. While I’m sure that there will be more detailed post mortems that will dissect which polls were “best” and which “worst”, it’s clear that those of us who thought the polls showing Barry ahead were bunk were very wrong. Nate Silver came in for quite a lot of criticism, yet he seems to have been in the right of it;

    2. Much has been written about the left-wing echo chamber. We must avoid the right-wing echo chamber. I suggest that it was in full-force during this election as many of us repeated the mantra that the polls were stacked, that dems were being grossly oversampled, that Barry was losing independents, that this state or that was in-play, etc., when none of this turned out to be true;

    3. Anybody who thinks that the power of MiniTru is broken or even significantly eroded needs to have his head examined. Yes, blogs and “new media” can damage whatever meme MiniTru wants to push, but fundamentally MiniTru still has the biggest megaphone and they can push or bury stories just as they always have;

    4. America is less a “center-right” country than a “center-left” one. I think that Mitt put his finger on it: 47% of our people, if they are not outright deadbeats, are at least comfortable with a deadbeat society in which Uncle Sugar is responsible for womb-to-tomb care of anybody who bothers to sign up. Further, they have no problem using the power of government to rob their fellow citizens to get what they want. Hello, Greece…

    5. E pluribus unum is dead (if, indeed, it ever really existed). The politics of division really does work;

    6. People scoffed at “Big Bird and binders”. This appears to have worked. Conclusion: the American people are not interested in – or care to even understand – Big Issues. To quote Mencken, nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public;
    7. We get the government we deserve. Now, we have to live with it.

    • Commander_Chico

      I have pointed out before that among the 47% are, for example, active duty NCOs (up to E6) who are married with stay at home spouses and two children.

      The 47% remark devastated Romney’s chances. It was obviously divisive – are you being ironic?

      • Vagabond661

        Obama said many more divisive things. Biden too. The difference is he has most of the media running interference. Benghazi is a prime example.

        • herddog505

          Exactly. Can you imagine if Romney had said that voting is the best “revenge”?

          But Barry DID say it… and nothing.

          Goebbels is in hell taking notes.

      • herddog505

        Yeah, yeah, yeah: everybody in the “47%” is a hard-working GI or single mother or minority who never got a break. NONE of them are deadbeats who expect (because they’ve been taught to do so) that Uncle Sugar is supposed to take care of them, that they’ve got a right to health care or a house or food stamps or whatever.

        And I expect that it WAS divisive (thanks in no small part to MiniTru doing its best to make it so): who wants to be called out as a freeloader?

    • JWH

      Some thoughts on your thoughts:

      As with many past elections, there needs to be a reexamination of the polls. Further, there needs to be a reexamination of how we view polls. While I’m sure that there will be more detailed post mortems that will dissect which polls were “best” and which “worst”, it’s clear that those of us who thought the polls showing Barry ahead were bunk were very wrong. Nate Silver came in for quite a lot of criticism, yet he seems to have been in the right of it;

      Pollsters who want to keep their jobs and their reputations do their best to exclude their own bias from polls; after all, their careers are (or should be) built on telling people the truth, not what they want to hear.

      That said, I can’t heap too much blame on Republican partisans for not believing the polls. When you are emotionally invested in one view of an election and polls point in an opposite direction, it’s natural to look for flaws in the polls and to cling to something, anything, that validates your view. That behavior is not unique to conservatives, liberals, or moderates.

      Much has been written about the left-wing echo chamber. We must avoid the right-wing echo chamber. I suggest that it was in full-force during this election as many of us repeated the mantra that the polls were stacked, that dems were being grossly oversampled, that Barry was losing independents, that this state or that was in-play, etc., when none of this turned out to be true;

      At your service, Herddog. Part of my job here is to minimize Wizbang’s echo chamber effect.

      nybody who thinks that the power of MiniTru is broken or even significantly eroded needs to have his head examined. Yes, blogs and “new media” can damage whatever meme MiniTru wants to push, but fundamentally MiniTru still has the biggest megaphone and they can push or bury stories just as they always have;

      Well, there’s a “MiniTru” on both sides of the aisle, Herd. I suggest that the proper role for any media outlet — any outlet — is to have a vaguely antagonistic relationship with all politicians.

      That said, the “MiniTru” is inevitably going to lose influence over time. The old influencers are losing power slowly, and the mess as a whole is shifting to personality-based media. In the future, more people will follow “Dana Milbank” or “Chris Cilizza” than will follow The Washington Post.

      I also want to reiterate what I wrote above. The Republicans committed a lot of unforced errors this cycle. Whatever influence the media have, they did not force Romney to make his “47 percent” remark. They did not force Todd Akin and his ideological fellow travelers to ruminate on rape and abortion. And so forth. The media did not force Donald Trump to go on his ridiculous birther tirades. The media just provided the microphones.

      America is less a “center-right” country than a “center-left” one. I think that Mitt put his finger on it: 47% of our people, if they are not outright deadbeats, are at least comfortable with a deadbeat society in which Uncle Sugar is responsible for womb-to-tomb care of anybody who bothers to sign up. Further, they have no problem using the power of government to rob their fellow citizens to get what they want. Hello, Greece…

      So what are you going to do about it? Withdraw until everything falls apart and you can do your best Nelson Muntz impersonation? Push for reforms that you and your ideological fellow travelers believe in, but that the rest of America will not accept? Encourage your legislators to tilt at windmills just to look good for the cameras back home? Or will you approach from the point of mitigation, doing your best to lessen the evils created by a center-left country?

      E pluribus unum is dead (if, indeed, it ever really existed). The politics of division really does work;

      It’s a complex thing. But I have a couple observations:

      First, the era of “bipartisan unity” after World War II looks a lot less like an era of good feelings if you look at the politics of the day. Whether you’re talking about civil rights, McCarthyism, Watergate, or LBJ’s handling of Vietnam, the nation’s partisans have been handily going at each other for decades.

      Second, to the extent that Post World II was a time of political unity, I think that was something of an aberration. Whether you’re talking about the recent unpleasantness, the attempted impeachment of Justice Douglas, or allegations that Grover Cleveland fathered a child out of wedlock, it seems that Americans have long been at each others’ throats over politics. Perhaps it’s the natural state of things?

      People scoffed at “Big Bird and binders”. This appears to have worked. Conclusion: the American people are not interested in – or care to even understand – Big Issues. To quote Mencken, nobody ever went broke underestimating the intelligence of the American public;

      Did they? Sometimes, it’s hard to remember that memes mostly exist inside small subcommunities. I have friends who (to my horror) confuse Star Wars and Star Trek. Tell a non-gamer that you used to be an adventurer like him until you took an arrow to the knee, and you’ll get a blank look. Did Big Bird and binders full of women really take root outside the pundits and political junkies?

      7. We get the government we deserve. Now, we have to live with it.

      Indeed.

  • superdestroyer

    Conservative politics is dead in the U.S. The future is about the coming one party state and how it will affect taxes, spending, policy, and governance.

    Also, the Democrats have learned that demographics trumps spending. Look for the Democrats to use “comprehensive immigration reform” to change to demographics of the U.S. to ensure that the U.S. can function as a one party state. As the demographics of the U.S.of tomorrow move toward the demographics of California of today, then national Republican Party will become as irrelevant as the Republicans in California.

    • Commander_Chico

      You are correct. The Republicans must change to survive. Hispanics are receptive to a party of free enterprise and some moral values. Another reason why Rubio should have been the VP pick instead of the disastrous Ryan.

      • superdestroyer

        There is no bigger myth in politics than the idea that Hispanics can become conservatives. Over 50% of Hispanic children are born to single mothers. The unemployment rate is higher for Hispanics. Hispanics do not attend church anymore than whites. Hispanics fail high school at a much higher rate than whites or Asians.

        Do you really think Hispanics are going to walk away from a Democratic Party that promises to tax the crap out of the gringos and give them the money.

        • jim_m

          When leftism demonstrates over the next four years that it cannot improve the economy, that it cannot pass a budget, that it cannot contain inflation, that it cannot protect US interests abroad, that it cannot pay for the massive entitlements it has been promising, people will be seeking a change.

          • superdestroyer

            The change that more than 50% of the voters want is more government entitlements for themselves while someone else pays the bill.
            The locals elections in DC, DEtroit, Chicago,and California should be enough to convince everyone that the Democrats cannot screw up enough to lose their core voting blocks. And those blocks are growing relative to the Republicans.

          • Hank_M

            “the Democrats cannot screw up enough to lose their core voting blocks.
            And those blocks are growing relative to the Republicans.”

            Good point and one, I’ll admit, that has me baffled.

          • jim_m

            Greece has the same problem. It’s working really well for them.

          • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

            When the money goes away – things will get much simpler.

            Not better, mind you. Not better by a long shot… but simpler.

          • retired.military

            Jiim

            You have more faith in the American people than I am left with. Stock up on ammunition while you can.

          • jim_m

            Doing so.

          • Vagabond661

            I fear that in this entitlement mentality they won’t even look up from their Iphones to see the decay around them. Look at that funny guy on Tumbler! Have you seen that cat gif on Imgur? My Obamaphone is still working and the checks are still coming in so it can’t be all that bad.

            Silly Republicans.

          • superdestroyer

            Most of the core Democratic Party groups do not care about the economy. They care about getting goodies from the government and the Republicans are not going to be able to present that.

          • jim_m

            I don’t disagree with your description of democrats as freeloaders.

        • jim_m

          There is no bigger myth in politics than the idea that Hispanics can become conservatives.

          How much of a freaking racist do you have to be to assert that Hispanics cannot think for themselves and cannot have divergent viewpoints?

          • superdestroyer

            How many divergent viewpoints does the Congressional Hispanic Caucus have? How many different viewpoints will I hear on Univision? Hispanics are very loyal Democrats and have been for decades. Even the Republican Hispanics are more liberal than the rest of the party.

          • jim_m

            So because a handful of congressmen are politically aligned you declare that ALL Hispanics can “never be conservative”. You’re a racist. Period.

          • Brucehenry

            You’re right, Jim. This guy spews the same stuff on OTB.

          • jim_m

            Thanks, I just find it repugnant declaring that no one of a certain race or ethnicity can deviate from a certain set of beliefs. People are people first and then they belong to a race or ethnic group. Race and ethnicity inform our ideals and beliefs, but they do not constrain them.

          • superdestroyer

            You might want to tell that to blacks who have voted at an over 90% rate for the Democratic candidate for decades. I find it laughalbe that Republicans and conservatives are forced to be so politically correct that they refuse to face the demographics of the U.S.

          • superdestroyer

            Over 90% of elected Hispanics are Democrats. Screaming racism just means who have found no reasons why a demographic group that is poorer than average, does not do well in school, and does not compete well in the information economy would ever vote for the small government, lower tax party. Hispanics have been very loyal Democratic Party voters for over 50 years. What could the Republicans possibly go to change that.

          • superdestroyer

            Hispanics do think for themselves and they realize that they party that promises to tax others and give the money to them is a better deal than whatever the Republicans can promise.

      • Vagabond661

        Which Hispanic spoke at the DNC?

        • TomInCali

          The DNC keynote address was delivered by San Antonio mayor Julian Castro. And he was introduced by his brother, Joaquín Castro, who just won a seat in the House.

          Any other questions?

    • jim_m

      Yeah, that’s why the GOP candidate won 49% of the vote, because conservative politics is dead. Wake up dumbass. There is no mandate for obama here. He had no platform or vision that he sold the public.

      Yes the GOP must change, but conservatism is far from dead.

      • superdestroyer

        The Republicans were uncompetitive in swing states when the unemployment rate was 8%. How do you think Republicans are going to win the future when there are more entitlements more government spending, and fewer taxpayers?

        • jim_m

          Uncompetitive?

          Florida: obama 50% Romney 49%

          N Carolina:obama 48% Romney 51% (Yep the GOP was so uncompetitive they actually won this swing state)

          Virginia: obama 51% Romney 48%

          Ohio: obama 50% Romney 48%

          Colorado: obama 51% Romney 47% (Chico’s favorite Johnson = 1%)

          I suggest getting a thesaurus to better understand the meaning of “uncompetitive”. Some news outlets still haven’t called Florida officially. I guess that is because the race was so uncompetitive. While you are looking up “uncompetitive” you should also look up the meaning of “functional illiterate”.

          • Carl

            Losing is uncompetitive. He lost.

            PS: He lost.

          • jim_m

            I see you didn’t do well in English class.

            So you would agree that obama was uncompetitive in the 24 states that he lost? I sincerely doubt you would admit to that even though obama failed to even garner a third of the vote in some of those states.

          • Carl

            He lost. Period. How badly does he have to lose?

            How about 303 to 206. Obama has 47 percent (lol!) more electoral college votes than Mittens.

            And you know what? That’s all that matters. That’s how we elect our President, and that’s how the best campaign staff ever won Obama’s re-election.

            Now Obama only got something like 25% of the votes in the state of Utah.

            He never – not once – set foot in Utah campaigning. Could he have won more votes if he had campaigned there? Of course. Did he need to? Of course not. There were many, many states where Obama could have garnered more votes if he had tried… but why try? Why waste your time and campaign cash trying to win more votes in states you write off – or win the national popular vote – when all of the adults in the country know that the popular vote does not matter in a national presidential election.

            All that matters is the electoral votes – and Obama got almost 50% more than Romney.

            Quit being a such a dense-headed idiot, Jim. You are the poster child for GOP stupidity – and the good news is you’re too stupid to know it.

          • jim_m

            Whiner

          • Carl

            Lol – weak tea there, jimbo. Youre bullshit was shot full of holes and the best you can do is “whiner”

            We won, Jim. We’re gloating.

          • jim_m

            You can’t shoot anyone’s argument fuill of holes because you are apparently allergic to posting facts and links to support your bullshit claims. When you start backing up your whining with links to show that you actually know something then we will give you some credence.

          • Carl

            Obama got 25% of the votes in Utah, Jim.

            That’s a fact.

            Obama never set foot in Utah campaign in Utah during this election.

            That’s a fact.

            Obama got 47% more electoral votes than Romney.

            That’s a fact.

            You sir are imbecile. These are facts, you can post links proving they aren’t factual, if you have the balls.

            You don’t.

            That’s a fact.

          • jim_m

            See my post above about the EC.

            You claimed that Romney was an uncompetitive candidate. You have been proven wrong by your own admission that obama could not get more than 25% in Utah. He got around 23% in Wyoming. He lost in 24 states.

            Romney was unsuccessful, but it was a close race in many states that he lost. That is not the showing of an uncompetitive candidate.

            You are a lying imbecile. You deserve to be happy that he won. You are a lying child to claim anything beyond that. Now you are trying to claim that the EC vote shows that he was uncompetitive. That was not the original issue. You’ve moved the goalposts because you are a liar.

            Why not link up with your racist friend Super and go tell some minorities what they think.

          • jim_m

            The electoral college is designed to make the end result more decisive than the popular vote. WHen you are on the losing side of that equation you cry that the EC should be abolished. You don’t hear that from us.

            The vote was narrowly won. Obama lost even worse in Wyoming and neither candidate campaigned there and neither had any connection to that state. My point being that you claimed ignorantly that Romney was an uncompetitive candidate. Obviously he competed well in 24 states. Your claim that he was uncompetitive was false on its face. You lied. Again. And again you won’t admit that you were wrong.

            I expect your gloating and don’t begrudge your glee. I just won’t back down to your lies.

          • superdestroyer

            That the Republicans had to spend a dollar in North Carolina or Virginia shows had bad things are for the Republicans. Obama won all the states that Gore, Kerry, and Obama-2008 won. There is no place where the Republicans can try to take votes away from the Democrats. 2016 will just make the Democrats look even stronger.

          • jim_m

            Stop moving the goal posts and admit that either your English sucks or you were wrong.

            I suggest going and examining this fine web site, where you will find that the dems suffered far worse set backs before (and the GOP as well) and we still seem to have a strong two party system. There is a great deal of data demonstrating the popular vote splits, electoral splits and the states won. States have shifted their votes between the parties over 200 years.

            Your claims that the conservative movement is dead are pure BS and not supported by the facts. As I said, there are now 30 GOP governors that would disagree with you.

          • superdestroyer

            You cannot compare previous elections because those elections generally involved only white voters. Given the demographics trends in the U.S. and the size of the federal government, no one can afford to be out of power.

            It is much more likely that the Chamber of Commerce types will use the idiot social conservatives as an excuse to leave the Republican Party and try to affect the Democrats from the inside. It the Chamber of commerce types try to stay with the Republicans, they will be nothing but prey for the Democrats.

          • jim_m

            You cannot compare previous elections because those elections generally involved only white voters

            What is it with you and race? You are so ignorant of history that you neglect the virulent ethnic prejudice that existed between different groups of European immigrants.

            Your claims that the Hispanics can never be conservative is patently racist. the very notion that someone’s political views are defined by the color of their skin is repugnant/

          • superdestroyer

            When the government gives benefits (quotas, set asides, affirmative action) to Hispanics just because they are Hispanic, they are going to remain very loyal Democrats. When the Democrats promise to tax the crap out of the Gringos and give the money to core groups of the Democratic Party (wealth transfer and increased entitlements. When the Democrats promise free healthcare, free education, and free social security to all of your relatives, then Hispanics are going to be very loyal Democratic voters.

            The idea that a demographic group where more than 50% of the children are born to single mothers is going to ever vote for the more conservative party is laughable.

        • Wild_Willie

          The conservatives picked up seats in the house. State houses and governors are majority GOP. (you do know what federalism is?) The senate is just one vote democratic. All of that does not mean conservatism is dead. You conclusion on the available data is so off the mark I think you have no idea what you are talking about.
          After Clinton and now Obama’s elections, the left has said the current GOP is done. Never happened. Never will. ww

          • TomInCali

            The conservatives picked up seats in the house.

            False. Current split is 242(R)-193(D). Current election results are 233(R)-193(D). Even if Republicans win all remaining unsettled seats, the best they do is status quo.

            The senate is just one vote democratic.

            False. Election results are 53(D)-45(R), with 2 independents expected to caucus with Democrats. That makes it 55(D)-45(R).

            Did you watch the same election as the rest of us? To use your own quote, “You conclusion on the available data is so off the mark I think you have no idea what you are talking about.”

    • jim_m

      Conservative politics is dead in the U.S.

      30 states with GOP governors beg to differ.

      • superdestroyer

        Since they tax and spend like Democrats, what is the point of having a few Republican governors. BEsides, many of them will be voted out of office in the next couple of years.

        • jim_m

          Governorships have been trending toward the right for several years dumbass. And it isn’t just a “few”, it’s 60% of the nation. Wisconsin just kept its GOP governor through a recall and increased the GOP representation in the State senate giving the GOP control of the entire state government. Tennessee and Louisiana are 100% GOP, the latter for the first time ever.

          These are long term trends that I am talking about. You claim that conservatism is dead but you offer nothing other than obama’s win here. I offer multiple states and multiple elections. You may have forgotten that a whole hell of a lot happens on the state level but the rest of us haven’t.

          • Carl

            The GOP failed on several fronts — including converting blue state governorships to red.

            But don’t tell the idiots. They are happy as clams thinking they are winning — something — anything.

            Republicans fall short in another governor’s race

            Republicans who had lofty ambitions for taking over governors’ offices this year fell short in another one of their targeted states Wednesday and clung to diminishing hope in another.

            Democrat Steve Bullock was elected governor in Montana in a race that had been too close to call until returns from key counties were tallied. Washington state remained the only undecided governor’s race, and Democrats there were in position to extend nearly three decades of control.

            Of course Jim got this wrong too. It’s because he hates facts and just makes stuff up to reflect his ideology.

          • jim_m

            So your claim is that 30 states are naturally GOP governorships and that failure to get more represents a clear failure of conservatism. You are claiming that conservatives should have MORE than 60% of the governorships.

          • Carl

            I’m pointing out that your clam that the GOP is increasing representation on the governorshiip front is just more jimm bullshit.

            I see you’re not denying that you were spewing nonsense that you made up.

            Hint: Your fantasies are not facts, jim.

          • jim_m

            SO you are going to dispute the number of GOP governors? Be my guest. Your posts are remarkable for being almost fact free.

          • superdestroyer

            Please name all of the Democratic candidates who lost competitive elections because they said stupid things. I can easily name more than five. The Republicans are not longer competitive in New York, California, Illinois, Washington, Maryland, or Mass. However, given the demographic changes in places like Texas, the Democrats will be a very influential minority instead of the totally irrelevant Republicans of California.

          • jim_m

            I grew up in Illinois. I currently live in Illinois. I can tell you that the reason the GOP is marginalized is because following the corrupt regime of governor Ryan the GOP lost all credibility. The GOP party structure has not yet recovered. It isn’t because there aren’t conservatives aplenty in the state (basically everywhere but Chicago,Rockford and East St Louis).

            Meanwhile the GOP is far more relevant in Wisconsin than it has been in decades. The GOP has taken over West Virginia in National elections where the dems have dominated since it became a state.

            Why not go spout some other ignorant and racially bigoted statements about how minorities are incapable of thinking in any way except the ways you approve.

            Things change dumbass. Only the ignorant claim that they are changing in a permanent way. To claim that conservatives cannot and will not adapt is arrogant and foolish.

          • superdestroyer

            The Democrats are more corrupt than the Republicans and it does not seem to have hurt them politically. The idea that if the Republicans just make a few changes that they can overcome the massive demographic advantages that the Democrats have.

            Minorities are thinking about how to improve their own lives and the easiest way is to raise taxes on others and transfer to money to themselves. Why else do you think they call conservatives greedy because conservatives do not want to pay more taxes.

            Do you really think that a demographic group that is generally poorer on average and where more than 50% of the children are born to single mothers will ever support the low tax party over the high tax, high entitlement party?

      • Carl

        The GOP, on its current course – will never win another Presidential election.

        And thank god there are morons who are demanding that the GOP “Stay the course” and if anything get even more radical and far right.

        The racists carrying tea bags took over the GOP after that black man got elected. 20% of the Tea Party member are racist. And those racists drove the agenda that lost the White House in 2012.

        heck, my sister’s chihuahua could have beaten Obama this time around — all you had to do was not show you’re a racist and not lie like a banshee.

        Romney and the GOP failed on both counts.

        • jim_m

          4 years ago when obama took office the dems were crowing that they would have a permanent majority that would last for 40 years. It lasted 2 years until in the midterm elections the GOP crushed the dems in a historic wave election, taking not only the House, but a majority of state legislatures.

          I would refer you to the same site I sent the Superidiot to. Nothing is forever. But I do find it funny that totalitarian leftists always think that their rule will last forever. I seem to recall a European nation thinking the very same thing as you do about 75 years ago. Didn’t turn out well for them.

          • Carl

            You havent’ a clue – and I intend to leave you that way.

          • jim_m

            In other words you can’t argue against the facts I present.

    • jim_m

      Conservative politics is dead in the U.S.

      Except where it is not:

      Republicans gained six seats each in the state House and Senate Tuesday, giving the party more than the “super majority” they sought in both chambers, according to complete but unofficial election returns.

      and

      Republicans recaptured the state Senate on Tuesday, once again giving
      them the complete control of state government that they used to enact
      sweeping changes in the last legislative session.

      I guess when you are an ahistorical fool it is easy to think that one election result will change for all time the political tilt of the nation. I suppose you have already forgotten 2010.

      • superdestroyer

        Winning irrelevant state houses doe snot offset not being able to win national elections. The U.S. Senate Republican candidate in Wisconsin was not competitive.

        Also, how many Republicans lost because they said stupid things and were unable to communicate with the public. How many Democrats lost because they said stupid things That would be zero.

  • Jack Zimms

    Just show nice guys finish last. Obama called Romney every name in the book and it worked. People claim they don’t like negative campaigning but it works. Republicans need to get off their high road B.S. and fight.

  • Carl

    “The Democrats showed that they are masters at finding seemingly
    outrageous comments by Republicans, creating faux controversies from
    those statements, and then playing them up in the press for all they are
    worth.”

    57 states! Obama thinks there are 57 states! Hahahahaha

  • jim_m

    obama is doing great for the stock market. That is if you are selling short.

    http://www.thegatewaypundit.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/stocks-drop-bo-e1352303992110.jpg
    At the time of this posting the market is down 301 points.

    • TomInCali

      The market is down due to expectations of Republican intransigence in the face of the looming fiscal cliff.

      • Vagabond661

        Uh…yeah sure. Santy Claus coming to see you again this year?

        • TomInCali

          No, I read the financial media. But I guess as we all learned last night, the media is in the tank for Obama, right?

          Update:
          Coming on the heels of Tuesday’s reelection of Barack Obama, the decline could be viewed as a “sell the news” reaction to what most on Wall Street expected. Others claim the market is showing its displeasure with the incumbent, even though the S&P is up more than 50% since Obama took office in 2009.

          “I’m not so real convinced this is some kind of reaction to Obama reelection,” says my Breakout colleague Jeff Macke. “If you bet on the favorite which is what Obama was you don’t get to gloat after. The market expected this.”

          Rather than the election news, stocks are taking their cues from those time-tested catalysts: Europe’s debt crisis and the dollar.

          Markets are also trading on the prospects of a resolution for the so-called fiscal cliff. As I discuss in the accompanying video with Macke, Henry Blodget and Michael Santoli, the market is fearful that Obama’s reelection means a continued stalemate in Washington, where the Republicans maintain control of the House.
          http://finance.yahoo.com/blogs/daily-ticker/obama-wins-election-2012-means-investors-155657964.html

          • jim_m

            S&P is up more than 50% since Obama took office in 2009.

            Please. obama took office with the S&P at a 6 year low after the housing bubble burst. Market recovery is not market growth.

            Market recovery is even easier when you are more than tripling the monetary supply. Money needs to go somewhere. What obama has done that few are willing to admit is he has inflated the dollar and is claiming the inflation as market growth.

          • Vagabond661

            Yeah when I need financial advice I always turn to Yahoo blogs…..

          • TomInCali

            Do you really need someone to teach you how to use Google now? Because I can find similar articles for you at Forbes or Bloomberg, if you need help.

          • Vagabond661

            Yawn. Like I would really take your advice.

      • jim_m

        Really? And it has nothing to do with the 1200+ days without a budget that obama and his Dem controlled senate are responsible for. Would we be facing such a crisis if obama had not jacked up spending by nearly $1T per year and then governed by continuing resolution for the last 3 years? It’s really hard to claim that his neglect/incompetence have had nothing to do with the present crisis.

        His last three budgets could not even muster a single dem senator to vote in favor of them.

        The market is down because the anti-business socialist won yesterday. Get your money out because Mr “I won” is going to have to find a compromise where he has never had any experience in his entire life doing so. I’m sure that his answer will include his going golfing while someone else tries to do his job for him.

        • TomInCali

          And it has nothing to do with the 1200+ days without a budget that obama and his Dem controlled senate are responsible for.

          So… whatever influence that might have had on the market, you’re saying that just kicked in today? After sending the market up all year?

          • Vagabond661

            Printing money will do that to a market. Now it will end. Hence the downward mobility.

          • jim_m

            The point is that the market is seeing that a solution depends on a President with a history of avoiding the issue and doing nothing, which makes matters worse in this case.

  • TomInCali

    Well, that didn’t take long. Not even 24 hours after Obama wins, and you’re already putting spin on and dismissing what lessons you could have learned from Romney’s failed campaign. I bet you still think the polls were wrong, too.

    Just to nitpick a few things:

    The Democrats showed that they are masters at finding seemingly outrageous comments by Republicans, creating faux controversies from those statements, and then playing them up in the press for all they are worth.

    “you didn’t build that”
    “we tried our plan — and it worked”
    “If we keep talking about the economy, we’re going to lose”
    “a little bit lazy”
    “I actually believe in redistribution”

    At least the Democrats used full-context quotes where Romney and other Republicans actually meant what they said. Playing them up is part of the game. But what the Republicans did to the Obama quotes above is take them out of context and blatantly lie about what he was talking about when he said them. I know you won’t admit that, but I still find it laughable that you can sit there and sniffle about how the big, bad Democrats created “faux controversies” from candidates’ actual statements.

    Barack Obama will probably win with a popular vote margin of around 0.5% to 1%. Hardly a mandate. Hardly vote of confidence.

    And yet, a greater margin than Bush’s 2000 win, where he supposedly had this “mandate”. (Oh, and Obama’s margin is actually around 2.2% as I write this.)

    The approval of marriage equality in three very blue states that are largely devoid of Evangelicals is not exactly an earth shattering event.

    Perhaps, but you fail to recognize that this is the first time that a direct vote by the people affirmatively approved a gay marriage bill (as opposed to decisions by judges, legislatures, or ballot referenda on anti measures), after many years of trying and failing. That is pretty earth shattering.

    The rest of your post (in stark contrast with several more thoughtful comments in this thread) offers no introspection into what Republicans need to do differently to appeal to the American public. If all you focus on is supposedly being outflanked by Democratic tactics, you’re doomed to repeat.

    Case in point:

    I have to wonder if the American people are less interested in “fighters” and more interested in Congressmen who canactually agree on something

    You really have to wonder about this?

    • jim_m

      Re: Gay Marriage. That a state finally did pass it is indeed a landmark. Not all states are ready to do so and society in general is not ready to accept it. But when activists demand a federally imposed solution to this they are making a mistake.

      Letting each state reach their own solution is the way to achieve a lasting and peaceful social consensus. Otherwise, we could cram our ideology down everyone’s throats and have social upheaval for another half century like we are getting from Roe v Wade. Then again, I think some activists would prefer the upheaval.

  • retired.military

    So 3 guys walk into a bar.

    One is a republican. he has a horribly twisted leg and uses crutches. One is an independent who is a hunchback, the 3rd is a young democrat who appears to be in great pain and uses a walker to get around.

    The 3 guys sit down and order beers. A few minutes later Jesus comes into the bar and sits down.

    The republican calls the waitress over and asks if he was seeing correctly and was it Jesus in the bar. The waitress says “Yes it is” The republican orders a beer for Jesus and pays for it.
    15 minutes later The independent calls the waitress over and orders a beer for Jesus and pays for it as well.

    15 minutes later the democrat calls the waitress over and he too buys a beer for Jesus.

    After Jesus has finished his beers he walks over to the republican and says “Thank you for the beer” he then touches the republican and says :”you are healed’. THe republican jumps up and down on his new perfectly health legs and goes whooping and hollering as he runs out the bar.

    Jesus walks over to the independent and says “Thanks for the beer” Jesus then touches the independent and says “You are healed”. The hunchback suddenly disappears and the man does backflips out of the bar yelling and screaming.

    Jesus walks over to the democrat and says “Thank you for the beer” THe democrat throws the walker at Jesus and runs out the bar screaming. “Dont touch me I am on disability”

    • Hugh_G

      Stupid is as stupid says. I spent way too much time reading this tripe.

      • retired.military

        Lighten up Hugh. Am I supposed to put on sack cloth and ashes since my party lost?

        I hope the ones who voted for Obama get most of the stuff they wanted. Not gay marriage or legalize drugs or more abortions or paid for contraceptives. But things like more jobs and a better economy and maybe govt working together to save social security and medicare and the country at large. If it doesnt happen I can say I told you so in the ruins of the country. If it does they can say I told you so in a better country and I will gladly take their smiles and I told you so’s. . For all our sake I hope that they are more right than I think I am .

        • Hugh_G

          Well a couple of things. I shouldn’t have called it tripe. Next time warn us if it’s going to a (bad) joke.

          No, you’re not supposed to wear sack cloth and ashes. Nor am I going to gloat.

          We still have serious problems to solve though I am glad that gay couples can be married and that women have the right to choose what to do with their own bodies.

          But most importantly, I agree with everything else you said. But the only way I see it working if there is sacrifice on both sides – with taxes and with entitlements and defense. I’m not optimistic though.

          I have always supported President Obama but have been disappointed in his inability to do more outreach to the other side, and that has to be mutual. I am hoping he will become a little more “Clintonesque” in that regard. (I had lunch today with a good friend who is a conservative and we came up with the solution – make Bill Clinton the new Secretary of the Treasury because of his ability to get along with pretty much everyone!)

          • retired.military

            Next time I will warn you if it will be a joke. Good bad or otherwise.

          • mudsack

            Gay people cannot ‘marry’ each other any more than you can make a martini with vodka and gin and NO vermouth. You don’t have the correct ingredients. You can CALL it a ‘martini’ (‘marriage’) but you would be lying to yourself and everyone else.

          • Hugh_G

            Well you can have your belief and I respect that. However, the flaw in your statement (about gay marriage) is in the facts. In Iowa, where I reside, gave couples are “married” all nice and legal like.

            As an aside, the right (if you are) in this country denies facts and believes in their own beliefs. That’s all well and good except it denies reality – such as the “gay” couples happily married here in Iowa, and other states as well.

            Oh, and it is constitutional here in Iowa.

  • retired.military

    All my liberal friends told me that if I voted for Romney that things would be really bad the next 4 years for America. Looks like they were right.

    One person who was overjoyed to see Obama reelected was Jimmy Carter. Carter doesnt have to worry about the title of worst American persident being hung around his neck for all of history.

    On a bright note we can hope that Romney never runs again. Whose turn is it next? Huckabee? We can make it hat trick with him running.

    • Brucehenry

      Here’s an article that offers an explanation of why conservatives were so sure they were going to win this election, and why they were so wrong.

      http://thedailybanter.com/2012/11/failure-of-the-conservative-media-to-predict-election-symptomatic-of-bankrupt-ideology/

      • Carl

        Why the difference?

        In short, the Right used ideology as the intellectual underpinning of
        their projections, while everyone else used facts. Nate Silver isn’t a
        mystic or the modern incarnation of Nostradamus – he’s an
        extraordinarily thorough polling analyst who bases predictions on a
        formula that accounts for real world margins of error and reporting
        discrepancies. It isn’t perfect, but the methodology is pretty airtight
        when it comes to projecting accurate odds. That’s why every half decent political analyst took Silver’s projections seriously and discounted the Right wing noise machine when it came to picking a winner.

        This theme of fantasy vs reality goes far deeper than picking the
        winner in Presidential elections. It goes to the heart of what now
        constitutes conservatism in America, and why it is in perpetual decline.

        As Conor Friedersdorf writes in the Atlantic, conservative ideology in the US is now so far removed from reality that it now only exists as a money making machine for loudmouths like Glenn
        Beck and Sean Hannity:

        Post after post here on Wizbang spewed some far right voodoo instead of facts, and Nate Silver was dragged down one side of the street and up the other by conservative fatheads spewing nonsense.

        And we liberals told them they were crazy – just as we’ve been pointing out their craziness for months.

        Thank God they don’t listen when we tell them they’re wrong… ;)

    • Brucehenry