Happy MLK Day

In honor of the Martin Luther King, Jr. holiday, I present an excerpt from Dr. King’s famous “I have a dream” speech:

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: “We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.”

I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slave owners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood.

I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice.

I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor’s lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers.

I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together.

This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God’s children will be able to sing with a new meaning, “My country, ’tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim’s pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring.”

And if America is to be a great nation this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!

Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado!

Let freedom ring from the curvaceous slopes of California!

But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!

Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee!

Let freedom ring from every hill and molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

And when this happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God’s children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, “Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!”

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  • jim_m

    Someday people really will judge each other on the content of their characters… but not if the left has anything to say about it.

    When every government form asks me for my race it is a demonstration that we have only institutionalized judging people by the color of their skin. It’s without question better than it used to be, but it isn’t what it could or should be.

  • jim_m

    Someday people really will judge each other on the content of their characters… but not if the left has anything to say about it.

    When every government form asks me for my race it is a demonstration that we have only institutionalized judging people by the color of their skin. It’s without question better than it used to be, but it isn’t what it could or should be.

  • Brucehenry

    Oh my God, don’t embarrass yourselves. Look at this humorous article:

    http://wonkette.com/497759/cnn-was-martin-luther-king-jr-conservative-some-say-but-others-dont#more-497759

  • Brucehenry

    Oh my God, don’t embarrass yourselves. Look at this humorous article:

    http://wonkette.com/497759/cnn-was-martin-luther-king-jr-conservative-some-say-but-others-dont#more-497759

  • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

    I think he’d be pretty disappointed at this point. Character isn’t important, knowledge isn’t important, and I really think he’d be surprised at Rap.

    We’ve still got a ways to go.

  • ackwired

    Inspiring words still!

  • Commander_Chico

    MLK was a great man and a brave man. I suppose that’s redundant.

    • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

      Not necessarily. There’s those who are ‘great’, but not brave. There’s loads of folks who are brave, but never rise to ‘great’.

      He was the whole package.

  • Paul Hooson

    Looking back at this speech, it was indeed very inspiring Baptist oratory. It was indeed Baptists, Quakers or other religious leaders who have always made a big impression on this American society, often speaking out on issues such as slavery or injustice, equating social wrongs with sin.

    • LEGOates

      The religious, Baptists in particular, did far more in the cause of justifying slavery’s existence than they ever did in the service of eliminating it. Rather than mainline Christianity, far more credit is due the Freethinkers/Quakers.

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