Matthew Yglesias is a Special Kind of Stupid

After years of pushing liberal policies and denying the reality that they do not work, Matthew Yglesias comes face to face with liberalism and whines that regulations stifle new businesses. And then he gets moronic.

Starting a Business Is a Huge Pain

By |Posted Friday, Feb. 1, 2013, at 6:30 AM ET

Last week, having read my own writing about how it’s cheaper to buy a house than rent one in most markets, I decided to take my own advice. My wife and I bought a new place, and instead of selling our old condo, we’re going to rent it out. And thus I became a small-business man.

Don’t flatter yourself Yglesias. You’re not a businessman. Make payroll for a couple of years THEN you can call yourself a businessman. Skip paying yourself for a few months because you have 6 or 8 families depending on you for the very food they eat and they come first. Get a $10,000 bill from the local tax collector because they filled out some paperwork wrong and feel relived when you only have to pay $2,600 for their mistake, then you can call yourself a businessman.

Get a contract equal to nearly a year of your billing but have no way to fulfill it because you don’t have the capital available to you but the woman up the street gets a $30,000 grant to open a scrapbooking store -which closes in two months- THEN you can call yourself a businessman.

You’re not a businessman Yglesias, you’re a snot nosed punk who happens to own a piece of rental property. So does my 86 year old mother-in-law, she’s hardly an entrepreneur. And neither are you.

But I digress.

Did I mention he was a special kind of stupid?

The striking thing about all this isn’t so much that it was annoying—which it was—but that it had basically nothing to do with what the main purpose of landlord regulation should be—making sure I’m not luring tenants into some kind of unsafe situation.

Ya don’t say?

As a real businessman, not someone who just plays businessman on the internet, I find that last line so naive it’s almost unfathomable that an adult wrote it.  — Just wait until Yglesias learns that many regulations aren’t just irrelevant to their stated goal but they actually exacerbate the problem they are seeking to solve… he’ll surely come down with the vapors.

And yet tomorrow just as night follows day, Yglesias will write another story with a title like Regulation Breeds Innovation all the while completely blind to the irony and his own stupidity, even after it smacks him in the face.

And that my friends is a special kind of stupid.

 

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  • Commander_Chico

    No wonder you’re having trouble in business when you insult a potential friend.

    Sorry, Paul, owning rental property IS a business, and not an easy one at that. Take it from slumlord Chico.

    • lasveraneras

      You’re correct. Here is a working definition of the term “businessman:” “A businessman is a professional man employed in a white-collar job.” By this common definition, Yglesias is a “businessman.”

      What he is most assuredly NOT is an “entrepreneur.” There is an excellent article on the meaning and value of “entrepreneurship” at the Forbes.com link below.

      http://www.forbes.com/sites/brettnelson/2012/06/05/the-real-definition-of-entrepreneur-and-why-it-matters/

      In essence an entrepreneur combines land, labor, technology, raw materials, financing and capital to produce a new product or service which, if the investment is successful, will produce value added, and the accompanying benefits, to himself, his other investors, the community and the nation. In other words, “yes, he will build that.”

      Robert Heinlein, the late libertarian Sci-Fi author, addressed this important distinction.

      “Throughout history, poverty is the normal condition of man. Advances which permit this norm to be exceeded — here and there, now and then — are the work of an extremely small minority, frequently despised, often condemned, and almost always opposed by all right-thinking people. Whenever this tiny minority is kept from creating, or (as sometimes happens) is driven out of a society, the people then slip back into abject poverty.

      This is known as ‘bad luck.’”

      Yglensis is NOT one of the “despised minority” of entrepreneurs and builders. He, and his pal Obama, ARE chartered members of the “right-thinking people.” Yglesias is just taking advantage of an opportunity to speculate on the side and make a little scratch the easy way.

      • Commander_Chico

        Sez the guy on a government pension.

      • Commander_Chico

        Sez the guy on a government pension.

  • herddog505

    Look, let’s not be too hard on him. At least he’s got the sense to grasp, however dimly, that government regulation may not always be wise, benevolent, effective, or even make sense.

    Baby steps. Baby steps.

    Perhaps, as he goes along, he’ll realize that government regulation may actually be harmful. Then, we can hope that he’ll make the connection between government regulation and (deteriorating) economic performance. From there, it’s only a hop, skip and jump to joining us on the Dark Side.

    • jim_m

      Unfortunately, I believe that he thinks that government regulations are only bad when it causes him problems but that it is good in every other case. I doubt that he has generalized the concept to include the idea that if regulations suck for him that they do for everyone else even when they do things that he is not involved in.

      Notice that his complaint is primarily about local regs and not federal regulations.

      • Commander_Chico

        Local regs are actually the most burdensome to small business.

        The worst regs for a rental property owner were rent-control regs. There’s really not much else.

      • Commander_Chico

        Local regs are actually the most burdensome to small business.

        The worst regs for a rental property owner were rent-control regs. There’s really not much else.

      • herddog505

        Again: baby steps.
        Not that I think he’ll take any more, mind you…

    • jim_m

      Unfortunately, I believe that he thinks that government regulations are only bad when it causes him problems but that it is good in every other case. I doubt that he has generalized the concept to include the idea that if regulations suck for him that they do for everyone else even when they do things that he is not involved in.

      Notice that his complaint is primarily about local regs and not federal regulations.

  • JWH

    You’re both too harsh and too easy on Yglesias.

    You’re too harsh because you call him “snot-nosed” and belittle his experiences in contrast to your own. He’s not “snot-nosed” or anything like that. He’s just a first-time landlord. No more, no less. It’s just somethign he’s doing. No more, no less.

    You’re too easy on Yglesias because you ignore the real flaws in his article:

    1) He states that his red tape has nothing to do with the goal of making sure a landlord provides healthy, etc., accommodations. But he doesn’t really go much into that. I don’t see any discussion of the paperwork he filed, any discussion of the laws (beyond the fact that he finds them confusing), or any discussion of the goals of DC’s regulatory regime.

    2) Yglesias fails to explore other regulatory schemes. If he had, he might note that, for example, Virginia’s specific landlord-tenant laws kick in only when a landlord rents out a certain number of dwellings.

    Not to mention that DC’s landlord-tenant system overall is a pretty awful thing.

  • JWH

    You’re both too harsh and too easy on Yglesias.

    You’re too harsh because you call him “snot-nosed” and belittle his experiences in contrast to your own. He’s not “snot-nosed” or anything like that. He’s just a first-time landlord. No more, no less. It’s just somethign he’s doing. No more, no less.

    You’re too easy on Yglesias because you ignore the real flaws in his article:

    1) He states that his red tape has nothing to do with the goal of making sure a landlord provides healthy, etc., accommodations. But he doesn’t really go much into that. I don’t see any discussion of the paperwork he filed, any discussion of the laws (beyond the fact that he finds them confusing), or any discussion of the goals of DC’s regulatory regime.

    2) Yglesias fails to explore other regulatory schemes. If he had, he might note that, for example, Virginia’s specific landlord-tenant laws kick in only when a landlord rents out a certain number of dwellings.

    Not to mention that DC’s landlord-tenant system overall is a pretty awful thing.

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  • MichaelLaprarie

    This story has the same charming schadenfreude as George McGovern’s epiphany about the harmfullness of excessive government regulations when he tried to operate a New England bed and breakfast 25 years ago … http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203406404578070543545022704.html

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