Shock killing in Oklahoma has ugly racial overtones

A normally quiet weekend in the small southwestern Oklahoma town of Duncan was horribly interrupted at 3:00 PM this past Saturday, when a car carrying three teenagers pulled up behind a lone white male jogger.  The teens in the car fired on the jogger with a .22 caliber revolver, striking him in the back.  As horrified witnesses looked on, the jogger staggered and dropped to his knees as the car sped away.  He was pronounced dead at the scene by authorities.

The three teenagers were quickly apprehended.  The oldest member of the group, 17 year old Michael Jones, believed to be the driver of the vehicle, gave Duncan police a mind-boggling explanation for the crime: “We were bored and didn’t have anything to do, so we decided to kill somebody.”  Police also believe that if the boys had not been apprehended, they may have killed others.

The victim, Christopher Lane, was a 22 year old college student from Melbourne, Australia who had just accepted a baseball scholarship from East Central University in Ada, OK.  He was in Duncan this past weekend to visit his girlfriend, before classes started at ECU this week.

The other two teens involved in the shooting, James Francis Edwards Jr., 15, and Chancey Allen Luna, 16, have been charged with murder in the first degree.

James Johnson, one of the local residents who alerted police to the vehicle being driven by the three teenagers, said that his own 17 year old son had been threatened the same afternoon by the trio, who were brandishing weapons when they tried to talk him into joining the Crips gang.  After following up on Johnson’s tip, the police spotted the car in a church parking lot near Johnson’s home and arrested the suspects.

During the last couple of days, details have emerged that may point to a motivation behind the killing.  Unsurprisingly, it is “gangsta” culture.  Photos of the two teens charged with murder tell a story of young boys obsessed with guns, gang signs, and wads of cash.  On April 29, The Daily Caller reports that James Brown tweeted, “90% of white ppl are nasty. #HATE THEM.”

From a purely racial angle, this story becomes a little more complex.  Chancey Luna, the alleged trigger man, is mixed race.  His mother is white.  Michael Jones’ mug shot gives us a glimpse of an individual who is possibly mixed race, or possibly white.  Given James Brown’s infatuation with street gangs and gangsta rappers, it is very likely that this killing was to establish “street cred” with gang leaders.  Yet the evidence that Brown harbored prejudice against whites is undeniable.

So we have an incident where, to paraphrase Rep. Frederica Wilson’s breathless rant after the shooting of Trayvon Martin, a white man was literally racially profiled, hunted down like a rabid dog and shot in the street, allegedly by a black assailant.  Needless to say, this horrific crime does nothing to advance the critical race theory agenda, so the usual race agitators have stayed far away from the cameras.  This morning, Rev. Jesse Jackson finally got around to Tweeting, “Praying for the family of Chris Lane. This senseless violence is frowned upon and the justice system must prevail.”

Frowned upon.  Really?  It’s not Selma, Alabama all over again?  It’s not the Emmett Till killing all over again?

But today, Allen West asked the obvious question: “Who will President Obama identify with this time?”

Karma always has a curious way of working.  When President Obama and other high profile racial leaders inject themselves into a controversial case and publicly take sides, people will naturally wonder what sides they are going to take when the next controversial case comes around.  Of course our “leaders” have avoided discussing black on black, black on white, and gang-related violence again and again, choosing instead to lecture white people about how racist they are.

Perhaps its time we had a real discussion, instead of a lecture.

 

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