Where the Martin Luther King, Jr. Remembrance Day Became a Maori War Dance

There is one final point to make about the event honoring the 50th Anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr’s “I Have a Dream” speech held last week on the steps of the Lincoln Monument in Washington DC. Why the heck were Maori tribesmen invited and why did they perform a Haka, or war dance there? Isn’t MLK an American institution?


Purported Maori tribesmen performing a Haka, war dance

I mean, can you imagine what would have happened in 1963 if those organizing the freedom march on Washington back then would have included a band of tattooed, weapons-carrying, “Maori tribesmen” who performed a dance of WAR replete with screams, grimacing faces, and other such overtly threatening antics?

Rightfully it would have become a controversy that far outshone all the good works done that day.

But, even the threatening nature of a war dance aside, the Maori people aren’t even America nor from an American territory or culture.

What the hell were they doing at that intrinsically American event?

What PC idiot allowed these half naked men to cavort so during the MLK celebration. And, how were they allowed to bring weapons to DC and to wield them on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial?

The inclusion of these purported Maori tribesmen was a childish display of PCism run amuck. The Maori aren’t American and threatening war dances do not belong at a rally honoring the one man in American history most known for peaceful protest.

It was just another example–if perhaps the most outrageous one–of the monumental failure that this event truly was.

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Posted by on September 3, 2013.
Filed under corruption, Culture Of Corruption, Democrats, Liberals, Race.
Warner Todd Huston is a Chicago-based freelance writer, has been writing opinion editorials and social criticism since early 2001 and is featured on many websites such as Andrew Breitbart's BigGovernment.com and BigJournalism.com, RightWingNews.com, CanadaFreePress.com, RightPundits.com, StoptheACLU.com, Human Events Magazine, among many, many others. Additionally, he has been a frequent guest on talk-radio programs to discuss his opinion editorials and current events.He has also written for several history magazines and appears in the new book "Americans on Politics, Policy and Pop Culture" which can be purchased on amazon.com. He is also the owner and operator of PubliusForum.com. Feel free to contact him with any comments or questions, EMAIL Warner Todd Huston: igcolonel .at. hotmail.com"The only end of writing is to enable the reader better to enjoy life, or better to endure it." --Samuel Johnson

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  • Lawrence Westlake

    When you devolve into a de facto third-world banana republic you can’t act all surprised when you start to behave like a third-world banana republic. Politics has ripple effects.

  • GarandFan

    That’s just Barry practicing some more of that “Smart Diplomacy”. I’m sure he’s counting the Maori as one of those supporting the bombing of Syria.

  • Commander_Chico

    New Zealand’s an ally. Maybe their embassy offered to contribute to the event.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      If so, we finally have an international “contribution” that challenges uselessness and embarrassment of Obama’s gift to Gordon Brown.

    • LiberalNightmare

      Could New Zealand be one of Deb’s unnamed contributors to Obama’s illegal war? Barefoot warriors don’t put boots on the ground y’know?

  • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

    Weird.

    But hey – you gotta have priorities, right?

    (It’d be nice sometimes if you could actually figure out what the priorities are, but… )

  • yetanotherjohn

    Well given that there wasn’t a Black US senator to invite, they had to fill the program with something. Oh yeah, there was a Black US senator to invite, he just happened to be in the wrong party.
    So not only did the organizers decide on Maori war dance, but they decided on Maori war dance over a Black US senator.

    • Brucehenry

      Some rubes will believe anything. Scott declined an invitation to attend, saying he would be in South Carolina the day of the event. If he couldn’t attend, he couldn’t speak, now, could he?

      http://blogs.rollcall.com/wgdb/tim-scott-declined-invite-to-attend-march-as-spectator/

      • jim_m

        Good article. I especially liked the part about how the leftists were all offended that he didn’t attend the DC observances and attended an observance in his home state of SC at a church where his cousin is pastor. It’s like he’s a black man so he cannot have rule over his own time and the establishment can dictate to him what he does in his time off. Once again the left votes in favor of slavery.

        All snark aside, why would anyone from the GOP attend an event sponsored by the national NAACP, an organization that is only nominally about advancing the rights of black people and is far more about advancing an ultra left wing agenda? Any attendance would likely have been criticized just as much as not attending.

        • Brucehenry

          Except the article doesn’t say the “leftists were all offended” by Scott’s absence. It says, and I quote, “The GOP’s absence was lambasted.”

          • jim_m

            You don’t lambast someone if you aren’t upset by their words or actions. And why should their lack of attendance be condemned when they are speaking at other events?

            My snark still stands.

          • Brucehenry

            Your snark was about Scott specifically when the article didn’t say the “leftists were all offended” by his specific absence. Unless you think “the leftists” were trying to “enslave” Boehner, Cantor, and McConnell.

            And I’ll try to keep your anti-lambasting admonition in mind while I stroll down memory lane and think of the flag pin “controversy.”

            Edited to add: I don’t give a shit that Republicans didn’t attend the 50th Anniversary event, but really, you don’t think it was tone deaf AT ALL that no Republicans came?

      • yetanotherjohn

        The only African American serving in the Senate, Republican Tim Scott, wasn’t invited to partake in the festivities today, a spokesman confirmed to ABC News.

        http://abcnews.go.com/blogs/politics/2013/08/no-republicans-onstage-for-march-on-washington-anniversary-its-complicated/

        The Senate’s only black lawmaker wasn’t invited to speak at Wednesday’s 50th anniversary March on Washington, because Tim Scott’s office declined an invitation to attend the ceremony as a spectator, according to a source connected to the event.

        http://blogs.rollcall.com/wgdb/tim-scott-declined-invite-to-attend-march-as-spectator/

        Scott may have been invited as a spectator, but he wasn’t invited to speak. The point of my post stands. Not only did the organizers decide on a Maori war dance, but they decided on Maori war dance over giving the time to a Black US senator to speak.

        • Brucehenry

          The list of invited speakers was taken from the list of invited attendees. He had said he would be in South Carolina that day.

          • jim_m

            The article says that he was not invited to speak. Period. He was only ever invited to attend and then criticized for not attending when he was invited to speak elsewhere.

            When you are being snubbed by the organizers to begin with it is not mandatory to show up. Oddly, the left doesn’t own everyone else (despite their desire and belief that they should).

          • Brucehenry

            If I invite you to my wedding and you say you can’t attend, should I ask you to be best man?

          • jim_m

            It says that “Much of the speaking program was created based on those who were able to confirm availability to attend the event” That is common in lengthy programs where you are trying to fill space. However it also implies that at least some speakers (one would assume the most desired and significant speakers) were invited to speak up front.

            It would also be likely that those who were directly invited to speak would have been invited to speak more than just a couple of weeks in advance since, as desirable speakers, they might otherwise accept a conflicting engagement.

            As the only black Senator, Scott should have been on the list of most desirable speakers. Obviously he was not. He does not deserve to be relegated to a space filler.

          • Brucehenry

            Subjective. Judgment call. And not what “yetanotherjohn” was claiming.

          • yetanotherjohn

            The facts are clearly stated in the article. For whatever reason and motivation (I suspect because he was a Republican but can’t prove it) the organizers decided not to extend an invitation to Scott for him to speak. They ended up with a presentation that did have enough space for Maori war dance. Did they make a conscious decision of Maori over the only US senator who happens to be black (probably not) or did they back into it (most likely), the net effect was that their actions had the consequence selecting a Maori war dance over US senator. Obviously they did not put a high priority on getting the only Black US senator for their program. If this had been the 44th anniversary in 2007, can you imagine them skipping Obama’s invitation to speak? As far as an invitation to attend, where any US senators not invited to attend?

  • Paul Hooson

    I have a scheme? Great God Almighty, I have a scheme….

  • Paul Hooson

    I was joking about “I have a scheme”, but the original 1963 event was heavily hijacked by Black Muslim organizations as well as some Communist and socialist organizations who wanted to take the speech by a Black Baptist minister who was preaching against what he saw as “sin”(racial discrimination) for their own political ends. – President Johnson later invited Dr. Martin Luther King to the White House when he signed the 1964 Civil Rights Act, but Johnson and other Democratic supporters of this White House soon distanced themselves from King after he became part of the leftist antiwar peace movement that sought to promote Soviet and North Vietnamese foreign policy goals in SouthEast Asia.

    Note that most of the men on the platform with King are members of Black Muslim associated groups here, and not members of mainstream religious groups. The Black Muslim influence at this event couldn’t have been much stronger than it was.

    • Brucehenry

      Yeah yeah and George Washington was greedy or something something blah blah.

      • Paul Hooson

        Look at this picture, Bruce Henry. This looks like some Black Muslim event, and hardly a mainstream event. Some of these groups have had outrageous histories including the leadership of Louis Farrakhan, who preached that the Jewish faith was a “gutter religion” and preached a message of pure hate. – King also made himself an easy tool for various Communist organizations to embrace as well.

    • jim_m

      It was a civil rights protest. What difference does it make what religion they are? Seems to me that as black men they were all making the same sort of point

      • Paul Hooson

        I think King had a real obligation to keep the event a mainstream political event, instead he made himself an easy tool of many extremists seeking to use his name to promote their own extreme agendas.

        • Brucehenry

          One, you posted the wrong picture to prove your ‘point.”

          Two, what is remembered, 50 years later, about this event? Is it the fact that many people who you call extremists “used King’s name to promote their own extreme agendas?” Or is it the “Dream” speech?

          I’ve seen pictures of the speech. I know many of the names of the people who surrounded Dr King on that stage. Every last one of them were civil rights heroes, and if they were Muslims or communists too, well then, they were Muslims or communists too. And Americans.

          Those people, whether they were Muslims, communists, or Kiwanians for that matter, did more good on that day in 1963 than you’ve done in your whole pathetic blowhard life.

        • jim_m

          What? King had an obligation to whom? Seems to me that if he is organizing it he can invite just about anyone he pleases.

        • Jwb10001

          I never knew you had to be invited to be at any national park no matter who was speaking. If there were radical elements in attendance so what. Was King supposed to discriminate, seems a bit out of character. Was he supposed to ask for a political solidarity pledge? This is a nonsensical argument. I suspect Dr, King would have welcome all factions and all races to participate especially those that might be inclined to non peaceful means. They had common cause at least in regard to plight of African Americans in the US during this time.

      • Paul Hooson

        Jim M. Pick up a copy of King’s book, “Stride Towards Freedom” where King states that he read Marx and was influenced by his thinking. King wasn’t a member of CPUSA, but he certainly was influenced by the works of Marx and other radicals. He wasn’t really the mainstream civil rights leader that some historical revisionists have made him into in recent years. – So did he do some good and help to move civil rights ahead? Yes. And he was more moderate than many more extreme and radical civil rights leaders. – So he deserves both credit on one hand, but also some caution on the other hand to his actual place in history.

        • Brucehenry

          Generous of you to acknowledge that Dr Martin Luther King Jr did “some good.”

          • Paul Hooson

            He did advance civil rights and equal opportunity. However, some like FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover remained wary of King. It was however very regrettable that Hoover and some in the FBI likely knew of the plot by James Earl Ray to assassinate the civil rights leader, but deliberately did nothing to notify King’s security detail in hopes that Ray would be successful, leaving the FBI one less problem person to worry about. – That seems terrible to me.

          • Jwb10001

            Seriously? J Edgar Hoover was wary of EVERYONE. Of course he was wary of King, but for no good reason. J. Edgar Hoover spent hundreds of thousands of dollars trying to figure out what the words to Louie Louie were. The man was NUTS. King did not necessarily have to give Hoover any legitimate reason to be wary.

          • Paul Hooson

            My girlfriend is White and Jewish, but her father remarried a Black woman, so most of her family members are Black. And, some of her Black relatives have lived with me at one of my homes before. I’m certainly pro-civil rights and equality. I love my extended family. – However, I caution that Martin Luther King was something of a mixed bag himself. He did do some good, but he also was heavily used by some radicals for their own political purposes as well. Even worse, was after his death how some real radicals claimed to be his heir apparent such as some like Lois Farrakhan.

          • http://www.rustedsky.net JLawson

            I think he did a lot of good, for what it’s worth. If he hadn’t been killed, it would have been interesting to see what he’d done.

        • jim_m

          I read Machiavelli and was influenced by his thinking. It doesn’t make me a Medici

          But yes, King was a socialist. So what? That does not make his civil rights positions communist or socialist.

          • Paul Hooson

            King stated in his writings that he wanted to move the U.S. towards a “redistribution” of wealth a “democratic socialism”. I have his books. I own a 10,000 book home library. I read a great deal. – I just take King at his word for what he says about himself.

          • jim_m

            I’m less concerned about King’s socialist views than I am about our current administration’s. Nobody cites King’s views on redistribution but there have been plenty in this admin who have cited Mao as their favorite political philosopher. Try to focus on things that are actually important.

          • Brucehenry

            “It doesn’t make me a Medici.”

            Awesome, Jim. I laughed out loud. Very good.

  • ackwired

    I wouldn’t feel too threatened by it.

  • http://www.outsidethebeltway.com rodney dill

    They’re doing the “YBMCA” song.