Black Writer Whines That White Hip Hop Fans Don’t ‘Give a Sh*t’ About Blacks

A fellow going by the moniker “Stereo Williams,” one who claims to be an entertainment writer from New York, is all weepy because he thinks white kids who are fans of rap music “don’t give a shit about blacks.” But a look at the lyrics of nearly any rap song pretty much proves that the blacks that make the stuff are really the ones who don’t give a shit about blacks.

In his May 5 article, eruditely entitled, “Too Many White Hip-Hop Fans Don’t Give a Shit About Black People,” the entertainment critique noted that at least two generations of Americans have now grown up with rap and hip hop music as their music of choice. But from that platform, Williams does a high jump straight to the riots in Baltimore.

Williams noted that many of the white friends he grew up with–those same kids who quoted Notorious B.I.G. and 2Pac in middle and high school–now unbelievably “vote red” and have kids of their own. Worse in his view is that some of them have taken to social media to say that the criminals and barbarians who torched Baltimore are “thugs” (his quote marks).

“Kids who had worshipped 2Pac,” Williams whines, “were now voicing their unequivocal support for police who ‘put their lives on the line.’ The ’60s hippies became .80s yuppies. And .90s wiggers are now in the Tea Party.”

It all culminates in a betrayal, as far as Williams is concerned. “So many of these white people who were raised on songs of the struggle of inner city black folks just don’t give a shit about inner city black folks,” he writes.

Williams goes on to insist that rap music is the “music of the struggle” and treats the genre as a legitimate source of social criticism but says that despite growing up awash in the rhetoric, too many white kids haven’t inculcated the nonsense spewed in rap music to give the criminals in Ferguson and Baltimore a pass for their behavior.

Then, like many liberals and excusers of criminality, Williams piles on to attack the Baltimore mother who made news last week when she slapped her rioting son off the streets to get him out of the riots.

To take a woman desperate to keep her son on a lawful path that treat her like the problem is itself an act of hate for the black community.

Regardless, Williams is all about the “rage” of this and the “lack of empathy” with that and attacks all whites as uncaring about the rioters’ plight.

He ends saying, “This country will continue to burn long after Baltimore begins to rebuild, as long as we allow the souls of black folks to entertain the same America that ignores the very real scars it’s inflicted.”

Now, one can see all this whining and see that Williams may have missed something with his lamentation that white kids who grew up on rap never learned how evil their so-called “white privilege” is. Williams seems to miss the real point: rap music failed because it is junk. It’s garbage that has nothing to teach anyone. In fact, that white kids might grow up, become adults, and leave behind their interest in the idiocy that is rap music is a good thing.

Sadly, the fact that many blacks only get angrier with rap music and seek to emulate the criminal behavior that the “music” genre promulgates is rather the problem, not that white kids stray from it as they age.

But it is also indicative of another problem. Few whites grow up “living” rap music. They may think it’s kitschy and cool to be rebellious as kids, but as they age they see that all the BS in rap “music” is not real life at all. Eventually they see it all as fantasy and then often dismiss it.

But many inner city black kids grow up imaging that rap music IS life and they continue to act on it as if it is real life as they age. This is the true failure of black culture and rap music. Sadly, rap offers nothing but hate, crime, and misogyny to its listeners.

In fact, by looking at the hate for education and women, the love of crime, the disregard for even proper English not to mention the anti-social behavior pushed in this “music,” one can only conclude that far from white rap fans not giving a “shit” about blacks, it is the black rappers themselves who don’t give a shit about blacks. With their “hos” this and “nigga” that, it is rap music that is helping cause the trouble in the black community, not helping to solve it. Anyone who is a fan of rap music should be ashamed of themselves.

Further, with the long history of “sampling,” even the music itself celebrates theft.

In the end, one must realize that Stereo Williams himself doesn’t really give a shit about blacks, either.

So, get lost Williams. You aren’t any paragon of truth. YOU are part of the problem.

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  • Paul Hooson

    My elderly White Jew Hip Hop handle is “LOW T”….But, comedy aside, Hip Hop is a huge influence of many White acts such as Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake and Katy Perry among others these days. While rock music was once the most popular music, Hip Hop is now the largest music market. It all boils down to commercial appeal and where the money is that drives what sort of music is popular and sells…

    • And they all suck.

      • Paul Hooson

        I prefer old rock myself, give me Ten Years After, The Doors, Canned Heat, Hendrix….But, for dance club music, tunes by White or Black Hip Hop acts mostly work well enough, and the girls at the club can dance to the music…

        • jim_m

          Thank you Dick Clark. (It’s got a beat & I can dance to it)

          But you are correct. It’s about what makes money. The idea that this guy is complaining that the kids that buy the music don’t share his ideological agenda is farcical.

          • Paul Hooson

            Yeah, he can’t expect music to follow some ideological or class conscious bend. It’s all about commercial appeal and producing a product, music, and selling that music for a profit.

  • Retired military

    I bet that most black hip hop fans don’t carry much about white people either.

    • ljcarolyne

      Exactly, and to be friends impossible. No trust now after this Regime. Be suspicious of everyone, now a days, lot of scammers out there.

  • Brucehenry

    Warner, you don’t seem to know there is a difference between “hip-hop” and “rap.” Also, the words “genre” and genera.”

    • jim_m

      Many song titles span more than one genre.

      Once again we see that you offer nothing constructive but only snarky comments meant to distract from the actual substance of the article.

    • There is no difference between it. It’s all crap. Junk. Garbage. (and yes I’ll fix that typo. Thanks for bringing it to my attention).

  • jim_m

    This is nothing new. For years it has been pointed out that the major appeal of Black rap artists was middle class, suburban white kids. Those kids aren’t old enough to fully understand what goes on in the gang ridden inner city, but they are happy to listen to the misic which glorifies drugs, gang crime and other transgressive activities that the singers rap about.

    So white kids don’t give a damn about your plight? So what? Maybe the fault is that <1% of your community makes billions off of the suffering of 99.9% of it by singing about how cool poverty, drugs and gang crime are.

    You want respect? You don't even treat your own people with respect.

  • WHO’S THE BUSTER

    I always find it amusing when someone definitively labels one genre of music “crap” as if there is a right and wrong about music. Every type of music has people that are adept within that segment and if people like it, so be it.

    I would imagine all of the commenters here listen to a wide array of music that encompasses many styles, some of which others dislike.

    Boy, how quickly my generation has come to emulate the people that smashed Beatles records on the air.

    Hey, get off my lawn.

    • The Beatles weren’t celebrating rape, murder, and theft. Rap is C.R.A.P. And anyone who likes it is anti-social and should be ashamed of themselves.

      • WHO’S THE BUSTER

        Midnight Rambler, The End, Riders on the Storm, Brown Sugar, Summer Nights, Excitable Boy, My Sharona, Maxwell Silverhammer, heck, even Mack the Knife and I am not even trying.

        Just for kicks, listen to Adam Carolla and Norm MacDonald discuss Kenny Rogers’s ode to gang rape, “Coward of the County”.

  • WHO’S THE BUSTER

    So, in no particular order, The Beatles, Stones, Tom Waits, James McMurtry, Lucinda Williams, Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Rodney Crowell, Bob Dylan, Little Walter, The Stooges

    • Paul Hooson

      That’s some good acts. Tom Waits is great as is Miles Davis. Little Walter is a great blues act, although I personally like John Lee Hooker as my favorite bluesman. The Stooges are a great proto-punk act. My favorite punk rock act by far is The Stranglers. Their musical ability and entertainment value are awesome. Their early efforts sound much like a UK pub punk version of The Doors, with a heavy keyboard sound and growling vocals.

      • WHO’S THE BUSTER

        John Lee Hooker, I stand corrected, especially as he “made his bones” in Detroit’s Black Bottom. He mentions playing at the Savoy in one of his songs.

        My parents saw him decades ago, which completely surprised me.

  • LiberalNightmare

    White rap died for me when Vanilla Ice had to get a real job –

    https://youtu.be/rog8ou-ZepE

  • Wild_Willie

    For the defenders of RAP/Hip Hop, you are incorrect.

    Having been a musician for a number of years and living through one of the most creative musical decades ever (70’s) people who say Rap is crap can be explained musically. The RAP/Hip Hop genre fits more into beat poetry. There is little musicality in the ‘songs’. No standard composition of verse, chorus, bridge, etc. It has an audience but it certainly isn’t a musical genre in my opinion. ww

  • Constitution First

    “Black Writer Whines That White Hip Hop Fans Don’t ‘Give a Sh*t’ About Blacks”
    What comes around, goes around.
    It’s safe to assume blacks don’t give a rat’s backside about whites.
    That said; what is the attraction to rap and hip-hop anyway? I think it sux-out-loud.