Concealed Carrier Rescues Police Officer, Kills Assailant

From the Washington Post:

When the man saw a patrol car parked on the exit ramp of a Florida interstate, he witnessed a scene too troubling to ignore: a sheriff deputy being slammed to the ground and beaten by a man in plain clothes.

The passerby, whom the Lee County Sheriff’s Office is now calling a “Good Samaritan,” rushed to the two men, telling the attacker he would shoot him if he refused to stop beating the deputy.

The attacker, later identified as 53-year-old Edward Strother, continued to pin down the deputy and attack him, and the deputy struggled to keep his weapon away from him. When the attacker failed to comply to his warning, the passerby shot him three times, killing him, the News-Press reported.

The deputy, a 12-year veteran named Dean Bardes, was treated for his injuries and later released from the hospital.

Mike Scott, the Lee County sheriff, commended and thanked the man “who engaged the crazed assailant and stopped the imminent threat of great bodily harm or death to our deputy,” NBC-2 reported. He did not identify the man, however.

[…}

Kimberly Jenkinson, a Florida woman driving by at the time, told WINK News she saw the man violently throw the officer to the ground.

“He just started punching him and hitting and hitting and hitting,” she said. “I was afraid for the police officer. I thought he was going to kill him.”

Later, she posted a status on Facebook that read, “I just watched a police officer get taken down. What is this world coming to?”

[…]

The “Good Samaritan” had a concealed-weapons permit that allowed him to carry his gun, NBC-2 reported.

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  • yetanotherjohn

    It was almost 40 years ago when a Texas DPS officer was shot after he made a traffic stop. The man who shot the officer then took the officer’s pistol and shot him several times in the back, killing the officer. An ordinary citizen was returning from a deer hunt and resting at a rest stop. He saw the shooting, pulled out his deer rifle and made a 150 yard shot that ended the issue. I always thought that showed a clarity of mind to see the traffic stop, see the shooting and respond appropriately. 150 yard shot is by no means a record shot, but it is also not a “gimme” shot. This was 40 years ago when the second amendment was under attack much more than today. This was before concealed carry. Of course this being Texas, the citizen who made the shot was honored, though he did have to go before a grand jury. Don’t mess with Texas.

    • Scalia

      Interesting. I had not heard that. Do you have the names of any of the parties involved?

      • yetanotherjohn

        Sorry. Didn’t see your inquiry until just now. You got the right one. I remember hearing about it when I was much younger.

    • Scalia

      Never mind. I found it. The patrolman was Sammy Charles Long.

  • I approve of this outcome.

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Justice was served.

  • pennywit

    Hey, Scalia. Google “The Negro and the Gun.”

    • Scalia

      Looks interesting (if you’re referring to Negroes and the Gun: The Black Tradition of Arms). Did you read it?

      By the way, do you not know how to add a hyperlink to a post?

      • pennywit

        I do know. But typing out HTML on a smart phone is not my idea of a good time.

        • Scalia

          Yeah, it’s a lot more cumbersome with a phone.

      • pennywit

        I haven’t read the book itself, but I’ve read the author’s summary of it, and some general commentary on the issue from the Volokh Conspiracy. It’s an interesting read, particularly considering where the players on gun control stand today.

  • Mary Gehman

    One down…thousands to go…

  • pennywit

    You have got to find a better phrase than “concealed carrier.” I picture the USS Gerald Ford with a couple leaves on it for camouflage …

    • Scalia

      Now that you mention it, that highway stretch in the photo I used sorta looks like the surface of an aircraft carrier. How “clever” of me!

    • How about “upstanding citizen”?

    • Scalia

      How ’bout them ‘Skins spanking the Packers?

      • pennywit

        Holy crap. I had to go to bed early in 3Q, but I regret missing that last quarter. 42-24, a lot of those points late in the game? And I know the Packers are on a downswing this year, but beating a dynastic team like that is no small feat for a team as steeped in mediocrity as the Washington Redskins.

        Also, that ringing sound you hear is the register as Kirk Cousins cashes his paycheck next year.

        • Scalia

          Yeah, it was a tight game until the 4th. Rodgers may have been slowing down, but he’s still an elite QB. The Redskins may not make the SB this year, but they look like they’re headed toward elite status.

          I’m not too happy about the Lions’ prospects for the remainder of the season. Yesterday was their easiest game, and they didn’t look good at all. At least we beat the, uh, Redskins! 🙂

          • pennywit

            Heh. Dont’ worry, we’ll always have the Cleveland Browns.

            I’m actually excited about Dak Prescott and Kirk Cousins both. The Washington-Dallas rivalry has been flat for years now, amounting to two suckocious teams. Now that the two teams are both behaving like elite teams (or close to it), maybe the rivalry will have a little more zip.

          • Scalia

            Yes. Even though I’ve been a diehard Lions fan for decades, I always enjoyed the Cowboys-Redskins games.

      • pennywit

        Looks like the Lions did pretty well, too. Hm. Are we looking at a generational shift in the NFL this year? A couple of mediocre teams — specifically the Skins, the Cowboys, and the Lions — are suddenly playing pretty well. And the last couple seasons have seen the emergence of a couple dominant young QBs as Peyton Manning and his generation retire.

        The Browns are still pretty sad, though.

        • Scalia

          Well, the Lions won in spite of themselves. After the bye, their offense was almost completely out of sync. Their defense and special teams saved them this time.

        • Walter_Cronanty

          The Browns aren’t “pretty sad.” They stink on ice.
          They are the worst product put on a football field in many a year – vying for the worst ever. Their 1999 expansion team was better.
          Interesting factoid [when “interesting” is defined as “vomit inducing”] – Ben Roethlisberger has won as many games in the Browns’ new stadium as any Browns quarterback [tied with Derek Anderson for most wins at stadium]. Next year, he goes for the record. AAaarrrgghhhh!

          • pennywit

            Well, if it makes you feel any better, the Browns look to be on track to make a record or two of their own …

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Yes, yes they do.
            Rub salt in the wound, much?

          • Scalia

            I hate to see a grown man cry, so enjoy:
            https://youtu.be/96Fn4iH6QII

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Yeah, good times. Pittsburgh went 1-13 – they were pathetic.

            After that season, Art “Moron” Modell traded one of the all-time greats at wide receiver – Paul Warfield – in order to obtain Purdue qb Mike Phipps in the 1970 draft.

            In that draft, Pittsburgh picked some boob from Louisiana Tech named Bradshaw……. excuse me – I have to go find my hankie.

          • Scalia

            Getting rid of Warfield was a horrible move, but of course it worked out good for him at Miami.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            “…of course it worked out good for him at Miami.”
            Yes, yes it did. And Browns’ fans everywhere take great solace in that fact.
            Did you borrow the salt from pennywit?

  • jim_m

    The criminal was Edward Strother, a 53 YO black man. This is already being called a racist act because he was not armed and he was just asserting his right as a black man to murder a white police officer.

    Thank you 0bama. This is what you have created in this country.

    • yetanotherjohn

      My favorite part of the Obama era is the racial healing.

  • pennywit

    Honest question here. Should there be SOME kind of official repercussion for stuff like this?

    http://abc11.com/news/woman-accidentally-shot-in-head-outside-raleigh-gun-show/1615756/

    Apparently, the guy was a concealed-carry permit holder, and he handed the gun back to his wife in the backseat of their car, and it accidentally discharged. I feel like there should be some sort of consequence here for negligent handling of the firearm, but I’m not sure what it is.

  • pennywit

    Hm. Should there be a consequence in terms of his concealed-carry permit? With due process, of course.

    • Scalia

      For the man in your linked news item? No. It was an accident and his wife was not seriously injured. Like I said, I can agree with a fine and a possible suit for damages, but I wouldn’t take his permit away.

      • pennywit

        Hmph. Back in junior high and early high school, I was in Boy Scouts. My last year of summer camp was absolutely miserable. A lot of new kids who didn’t know how to do squat and were generally brats. During that visit, I worked out my stress by going down to the rifle range. I was never a great shot, but it was very therapeutic. The people running that range were absolute hell on safety, and they’d boot you out if you weren’t handling your rifle correctly. I think I’ve inherited some of their attitude

        • jim_m

          Perhaps we should look at this in the effort to prevent car accidents. Once you have one accident you have your license revoked. That will increase safety.

          Perhaps we should enforce fishing violations with revocation of your fishing license and confiscation of your fishing tackle?

          Better yet, make any provable offense of malpractice culminate in the revocation of a physician’s license to practice!

          All of these things are potentially just accidents but we should use the power of government to really make sure that people suffer after an accident. I think you are on to something here. Something stupid and without rational perspective, but it is something.

          • pennywit

            I know you’re going reductio ad absurdum here … but there are states where your driver’s license can be revoked after a certain number of DUIs, or where certain kinds of reckless driving can have consequences for your license. Perhaps a “points” system similar to driver’s licenses?

          • jim_m

            And who are you saying should get those points in this case? The man who bought the gun? The woman who negligently discharged it? What if she doesn’t have a CCL, what is the recourse then? You are already on record as stating the man should, why?

            As I said above, this just sounds like an effort to create a law for the sole purpose of harassing law abiding citizens.

          • pennywit

            Hm.

            If the gun had discharged and caused significant injury, then the resulting civil suit would be against him and his wife, and there would need to be specific discovery and examination of the evidence. From the facts in the article, I see negligence on both their parts, as he was the one who left the gun loaded, and his wife failed to check the gun before handling it.

            As far as the points? Tough call, honestly. But keep in mind the goal here is not to excessively punish a person or confiscate his firearm after one accident, but to identify somebody who is negligent in has handling of guns and either re-educate him or get the guns out of his hands if the continues to be negligent.

          • jim_m

            Precisely my point. A law intended to harass gun owners because there are no clear rules or standards for assigning blame to what everyone acknowledges to be an accident.

            Do you honestly think that every accident MUST have some blame associated with it and that we absolutely MUST be able to punish the person who is assigned that blame for EVERY accident that happens?

            That is the road you are on. It is not a pleasant place that it leads to.

          • pennywit

            And I note, parenthetically, that I did not call for revoking the license. I said “some kind of consequence.”

          • Scalia

            I believe you said:

            Should there be a consequence in terms of his concealed-carry permit? With due process, of course.

            That implies that you’re suggesting a revocation of his license, no?

          • pennywit

            I’m thinking more like points (as below).

          • jim_m

            So you are saying that he should be responsible for the negligence of another person. Nice.

          • pennywit

            Jim_M, if you’re a lawyer, you may know better than I whether he could be found liable in a negligence suit. I think he could.

          • jim_m

            I am not a lawyer, and I believe that you can certainly find a jury to find him liable if he is wealthy enough to sue. However, the question is not whether you can find a jury to tag him with a big settlement, the question is whether you SHOULD.

            The answer to that last in no. (in case you were still wondering)

          • Scalia

            Yes, he could, depending on state law of course.

    • jim_m

      Yeah, because being shot (in the head no less!) is insufficient punishment for anti-gun ideologues.

      • pennywit

        Honestly, if somebody is careless with his gun and shoots himself in the head, I really don’t care. Thing is, this guy was careless with his gun (didn’t check to see if it was loaded) and his daughter was shot in the head.

        • jim_m

          So who is at fault? I always learned that when you pick up a gun you clear it yourself and you NEVER take anyone’s word for it. That puts this in the hands not of the CCL holder, but the other woman in the back seat.

          This just sounds like a great way to create a law that will be used to harass gun owners without end. How do you assign blame for an accident such as this? Why is it necessary to assign blame in the first place?

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Ah yes, the “curse” of Bobby Layne. It’s much like the “curse” of Rocky Colavito who was traded to the Tigers for…….
    I think Bobby’s curse has lasted a year or two longer than Rocky’s.