Comey Fired! OPEN THREAD

From the New York Times:

WASHINGTON — President Trump has fired the director of the F.B.I., James B. Comey, over his handling of the investigation into Hillary Clinton’s emails, the White House said on Tuesday.

Mr. Comey was leading an investigation into whether members of the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election.

“While I greatly appreciate you informing me, on three separate occasions, that I am not under investigation, I nevertheless concur with the judgment of the Department of Justice that you are not able to effectively lead the bureau,” Mr. Trump said in a letter to Mr. Comey dated Tuesday.

“It is essential that we find new leadership for the F.B.I. that restores public trust and confidence in its vital law enforcement mission,” Mr. Trump wrote.

Officials at the F.B.I. said they were not immediately aware of Mr. Comey’s dismissal, which Mr. Trump described as effective immediately.

An Open Letter from Actor Kiefer Sutherland: 'Dear Hollywood, This is My Apology'
Weekend Caption Contest™ Winners Week of May 5, 2017
  • Scalia

    Oregon’s no-gender driver’s licenses?

    Oregon may soon become the first U.S. state to allow residents to identify as “nonbinary,” neither male nor female, on their driver licenses and identification cards.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      California currently has a bill under consideration that would allow a “nonbinary” option for birth certificates and other “state licenses.”

    • Hank_M

      The insanity continues.

      News headline of the future. “After a horrific crash in Portland today, Police are on the lookout for a person who fled the scene. Police described the person as no-gender. Anyone seeing this person is advised to call the Police immediately.”

      • Scalia

        Insane it is. We’re on our way to Rand’s Anthem. Their misguided effort to equalize everybody will result in liberty for nobody, excepting the “guardians,” of course.

      • Raaron

        “A no-gender non-racial entity of indeterminate age.”

  • Scalia

    Middle school student suspended for ‘liking’ photo of gun on Instagram:

    TRENTON, OH (FOX19) –
    An Edgewood Middle School student was handed a 10-day suspension for “liking” a picture of a gun on Instagram with the caption “ready.”

    The parents of Zachary Bowlin posted a picture of the intended suspension notice which read, “The reason for the intended suspension is as follows: Liking a post on social media that indicated potential school violence.”

    “I was livid, I mean, I’m sitting here thinking ‘you just suspended him for ten days for liking a picture of a gun on a social media site,” father Marty Bowlin said. “He never shared, he never commented, he never made a threatening post… anything on the site, just liked it.”

    The picture in question is of an airsoft gun, and according to the students’ parents, their child didn’t comment on the post but simply liked the picture.

    “I liked it, scrolling down Instagram at night about 7, 8 o’clock I liked it,” Zacahry said. “The next morning they called me down [to the office] patted me down and checked me for weapons.”

    Since receiving the notice, the family said the school has dropped the suspension and there will be no repercussions for the child’s actions.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      How about some repercussions for the educrat(s) who thought that a 10 day suspension was a good idea?

    • Hank_M

      I’d like to know how the school found out the kid “liked” the picture.

      No matter, I see we’re rapidly moving forward toward thought control.

  • Scalia

    77% black births to single moms, 49% for Hispanic immigrants:

    More than three quarters of African American births are to unmarried women, nearly double the illegitimacy rate of all other births, according to new federal data.

    The National Center for Health Statistics said that in 2015, 77.3 percent of non-immigrant black births were illegitimate. The national non-immigrant average is 42 percent, and it was 30 percent for whites.

    The new numbers were in a Center for Immigration Studies analysis on the births to immigrants. That total is 32.7 percent, but to Hispanic immigrants it is 48.9 percent, according to Steven Camarota, the director of research for the Center for Immigration Studies.

    • jim_m

      49% of black births are to Hispanic immigrants? Who knew?

    • Walter_Cronanty

      I’m sure this statistic is somehow racist – and borderline misogynistic.

  • Scalia

    HB2 didn’t stop NC from topping a ‘prosperity’ ranking:

    Acknowledging that it will “come as a shock to some” given the furor that enveloped the state after the controversial House Bill 2 became law last year, Site Selection magazine has ranked North Carolina tops in economic development.

    North Carolina’s No. 1 rating for 2017 – a ranking that is based on 2016 data – didn’t come out of the blue. Last year the state tied with Texas for the No. 1 spot in the magazine’s Prosperity Cup ranking, which it previously called Top Competitive States.

    But in the latest rankings North Carolina has no peer. Texas fell to No. 4, behind Tennessee and Georgia.

    The ranking “may confound those who had written off the Tar Heel State as a business-climate backwater” after House Bill 2 became law in March 2016, the magazine noted.

    HB2 made the state the butt of late-night talk show jokes and prompted companies such as PayPal and Deutsche Bank to scrap expansion plans in the state. Or, as the magazine stated, “the bill was an albatross around the neck of those championing the state as a location for facility investment.”

    A reminder: In March, Gov. Roy Cooper signed a law that replaced HB2, which prohibited local governments from enacting anti-discrimination protections for LGBT people and required people in government facilities to use bathrooms matching the gender on their birth certificates. But the new law includes other provisions, including a prohibition on local governments from regulating public accommodations before Dec. 1, 2020, that have drawn criticism from the LGBT community and others.

    But even when HB2 was the law of the land, Site Selection found that North Carolina had plenty to offer.

    It noted that the state had “one of the most educated workforces in the U.S.; a temperate climate; two international airports, including a major hub for American Airlines at Charlotte, which is also a top financial center; … coastal ports; a desirable mid-Atlantic location; top research universities and community colleges and a 3 percent corporate income tax rate – the lowest such rate east of the Mississippi other than Ohio, which imposes a gross receipts tax in lieu of corporate income tax.”

  • jim_m

    It’s fun to watch all the dems, who up until about an hour or so ago were damning Comey to Hell for interfering with Hillary’s coronation. Now they are all extolling him as an paragon of principle and an exemplar of perfection and rectitude in our justice system.

    Hypocrites, every last one.

    • Brucehenry

      Examples?

      • jim_m

        Go look in the mirror you POS.

        • Brucehenry

          Nice to see you again too

          • jim_m

            another lie from Bruce.

      • Jwb10001

        I saw a bunch twitter posts “Archibald Cox?”

      • Jwb10001

        Quiet a lot of pissing and moaning on here:
        https://twitter.com/PamEngel12/status/862060480160030721

        • Brucehenry

          Don’t see a word of praise for Comey there. Lots of snark about Trump. Certainly the words “paragon” and “exemplar” were NOT used.

          • Jwb10001

            Well, at this point there is no mileage to be gained by bitching about Comey costing Clinton the election is there? Are you suggesting that Comey was the liberal’s best friend a few short months ago? But hey I get it, that was then this is now.

          • Brucehenry

            Comey took a brave stand in 2004 and refused to authorize warrantless wiretapping in Ashcroft’s absence. Which is what got him appointed to FBI. I don’t pretend to know what was going through his head on Oct 28, or for that matter months earlier, when he held his press conference to announce “no prosecution but Hillary sucks.”

            His motives were, as far as I know, as pure as the driven snow, but still his actions had a negative effect on Hillary’s election prospects. That’s just a fact. Maybe not the decisive factor but a factor.

          • Wild_Willie

            AG Sessions was fired by
            Clinton and Remo dischared Director Sessions within the first few months of his presidency siting the same charges. There is no argument for the grown-ups that the rank and file agents are extremely disappointed in Comey’s leadership. Morale is very low. No one wants to work for a boss that is compromised. Personally I think Comey is one of the leakers to the dem side. Thus the faux outrage from Schumer.

          • Brucehenry

            Who is “AG Sessions”?

          • Scalia

            Elijah Cummings:

            I don’t know whether your family’s watching this, but I hope that they are as proud of you as I am, because you are the epitome of what a public servant is all about. Sacrificing over and over and over again, trying to do the right thing, sometimes coming under ridicule, but again still doing the right thing.

            https://youtu.be/4jH_DBR4pSI

          • Brucehenry

            Sure, but not Jim’s point. He said they hated him yesterday but loved him today. This montage is from just after his decision not to prosecute Hillary, when it seemed he was trying (it seems to me) to have it both ways — he wouldn’t prosecute but he called her reckless and that hurt her chances too.

            Of course Dems changed their tune when the Oct 28 announcement was made, and they turned on Comey pretty hard. Some would say rightfully so.

            But I still haven’t seen any examples of Dems praising Comey to high heaven AFTER his firing, as Jim claimed. I’ve seen plenty comparing this to the Saturday Night Massace, and I tend to agree.

          • Scalia

            Well, no it wasn’t Jim’s point, but Dems did indeed “praise him to high heaven,” so to speak, when he said things they liked. They milked it for all it was worth when it was to their political advantage, but they turned on a dime when it hurt their nominee.

            Their hypocrisy didn’t change over the past few months.

          • Brucehenry

            Shocker, huh?

            It’s almost like Republicans whining for years about Pelosi’s “We’ve got to pass the bill to find out what’s in it” and then being perfectly fine with rushing through a “reform” without reading the bill, knowing what’s in it, or getting a CBO score on it. Plus lying about preexisting conditions being covered — they won’t be.

          • Brucehenry

            BTW I refrained from any snark about “reading comprehension” but it was perfectly clear what Jim was doing in his first remark. His implication was that he had been “watching” the Dems fall all over themselves to praise Comey AFTER his firing — which they hadn’t done and still haven’t as far as I know.

          • Scalia

            Yes, the GOP did that, and I also chastised them for playing the merry-go-round with Advice and Consent. I never said the GOP is innocent in that regard. At least acknowledge it when you side does it.

          • Jwb10001

            Hypocrisy is about the only bi-partisan thing left in DC.

      • jim_m
        • Brucehenry

          LOL did you even read this? Doesn’t serve as an example AT ALL. Schumer is saying that ROSENSTEIN has a reputation for integrity (and said it on April 2).

          • jim_m

            Proves that he was down on Comey before and yet today he got up in front of the press and said that Comey’s firing is a grave bow to the justice system.

            It also shows that he praised the man who fired Comey as being a man of integrity. I guess Schumer must have been lying on both of those occasions. Something you would be familiar with since you never tell the truth.

          • Brucehenry

            And you do?

            “It’s fun to watch all the dems…” you say, implying that you had been watching them “all,” you know, “every last one,” line up in front of the cameras to extol Comey as a paragon of integrity. But you hadn’t.

            This weak sauce, in which Schumer rather blandly criticizes Comey as not deserving confidence any longer, hardly qualifies as Comey being “damned to hell,” nor does praising a guy on April 24 who fires someone on May 9th qualify as praise for Comey.

            You’ve always been full of shit. This here is just embarrassing.

          • jim_m

            Hyperbole dumbass. Once again you are too stupid to be commenting here.

          • Brucehenry

            So why didn’t you just say that up front, instead of pretending this weak piss you posted was an example of “all” the Dems praising Comey today when they were blasting him yesterday?

            Because you didn’t think anyone would ask for an example. You live in a fantasy world in which all your perceived opponents are all “hypocrites, every last one of them.” But when challenged, you can’t provide a single example.

            Like I said, you’re full of shit. And this “hyperbole” defense is pathetic.

          • jim_m

            My mistake was assuming that you were intelligent enought to understand the hyperbole and that you weren’t actually looking to see a comment using the precise words “paragon” and “exemplar”. The only one who has made a fool of himself is you, by unmasking yourself (pun unintended) as an ignorant ass who is incapable of understanding common English usage.

          • Brucehenry

            Oh sure hyperbole right

          • jim_m

            I use no hyperbole when describing your ignorance and dishonesty.

          • Indeed, if anything it’s understated.

          • Brucehenry

            Yours is certainly on display

          • jim_m

            I just realized that you are so incredibly uninformed about the situation that you did not realize that Rosenstein, as Deputy AG, was Comey’s boss and that it was Rosenstein who actually did the firing.

            I guess that just goes to show that you should STFU about things you are too stupid to comment on.

          • Brucehenry

            Actually Rosenstein and Sessions recommended the firing. Trump did the actual firing in the letter Scalia links to, above, Mr OhSoInformed.

          • jim_m

            If you bother to read on the subject, it was Rosenstein’s recommendation. Sessions only concurred. And yes, Trump did the firing, but it was at the recommendation of Rosenstein.

  • Retired military

    I think he should have been fired long ago. Right after his “We wont prosecute Hillary but here is all the things she fucked up as far as classified material goes”. If it was just about anyone else but Hillary (or dem politicians inlcuding Hoover Abedin on down) their ass would have been in jail months ago.

    • jim_m

      And on top of that the revelation that Huma Abbedin sent rafts of classified emails to her husband so he could print them for her and yet Comey cannot bring himself to refer her to the AG for prosecution. He is seemingly allergic to prosecuting politicians (specifically dem politicians).

      • pennywit

        The “rafts” was revised downward by FBI officials. Honestly, if he exaggerated the offense in testimony to Congress, that’s a firing offense right there.

        • jim_m

          True if he lied. However, it is also true that if she even sent a single classified document she is guilty of a felony violation of the espionage act and guilty of doing something that many have been sent to prison for while having done even less.

          • Raaron

            But she ‘didn’t mean it’ so it’s all good, totes.

    • Brian Brandt

      Yeah, I remember listening to his statement as I was driving. “Wow! He’s really laying on the evidence!” Then just at the point where he should have delivered the coup de grace, he says, “No reasonable prosecutor . . . “

  • pennywit

    This was a really crappy way to fire him. Comey reportedly learned about it from TV news.

    • Brian Brandt

      At least it wasn’t in the middle of “Take-Your-Daughter-To-Work” day.

    • Vagabond661

      That’s where Bill Clinton always got his news…

      • pennywit

        Irrelevant. If you’re a good manager and you need to dismiss a subordinate, you dismiss that person to his face, not via a letter sent to his office when he’s not there.

        • Vagabond661

          I agree. Just a tongue in cheek response.

          • pennywit

            OK. Got it. Incidentally, it’s also how Ed O’Neill learned that Married … With Children was canceled.

          • Brucehenry

            He’s found a great niche with Modern Family, and not nearly as buffoonish a role.

          • pennywit

            I always liked Married. Full House was so sickly sweet it made me ill. I liked Al Bundy. He hated his life, hated his job, and hated his family. But he understood his duty to his family and did it. Not well, but he did it. Plus, underneath it all, the Bundys liked to stick up for each other.

          • Brucehenry

            I don’t remember O’Neill being on Full House. Although I agree it sucked.

          • pennywit

            He wasn’t. I offered Full House for contrast to Married.

          • jim_m

            Snicker. Dumbass. #readingcomprehensionfail

          • Scalia

            I guess one of the few, if not the only, conservative programs, Last Man Standing, has been canceled. It apparently had strong ratings, so this is a little eyebrow-raising.

            Disclaimer: I stay away from TV as much as possible, so I don’t know how good that program was.

          • pennywit

            I binged-watched some of it on Netflix a few months ago when I was home sick. I was half-and-half on it. A few thoughts:

            * In the episodes I watched, the show did a pretty good job making sure that Tim Allen wasn’t a strawman conservative, and that his family weren’t strawman liberals. In character conflicts, sometimes Allen was depicted as “right,” sometimes the liberal characters were depicted as “right,” and often the show seemed to point to a road somewhere between the two.

            * Family bonds were depicted as more important than partisanship.

            * Tim Allen himself remarked that the show’s writers, often liberal, liked to use the show to poke at more ridiculous aspects of modern liberalism.

            * Tim Allen’s character had an Internet persona that was hypermasculine and hyperconservative, but in “real life” he was a little more middle of the road.

            * The show owed Norman Lear royalties.

            * At times, the show subverted racial and political stereotypes.

            My tastes these days run more toward Lucifer and iZombie — supernatural stories with a criminal procedural element. Last Man Standing wasn’t my cup of tea, but I’m a little surprised it got canceled. It had a pretty solid audience. And I think a lot of people can relate to the theme of balancing your love for family with your politics.

          • Scalia

            You mention Norman Lear. Was it a comedy show on par with All in the Family?

          • pennywit

            I don’t know if it was on par with All in the Family. But it used the same framework and the same conceit, right down to Meathead-ish character and Jefferson-ish neighbors.

          • Scalia

            Speaking of….here’s a good one:
            https://youtu.be/yuyR0fZ1MTY

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Classic.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            My wife and I loved that show. One of very few where neither conservatives nor fathers were consistently portrayed as ignorant, bumbling asses.

          • Scalia

            Yeah, it was a regular in our house too.

          • pennywit

            I’m a little young remember the show at all. I do recall my parents regularly watched The Jeffersons, though.

          • Scalia

            You might want to check it out. It’s very good comedy.

          • pennywit

            I’ll see if I can find it.

            I looked up a little more on the cancellation of Last Man Standing. A lot of partisan claptrap out there already. But here’s Deadline Hollywood‘s scoop, for what it’s worth. It looks like the show was pretty expensive.

            Personally, I would have kept it on the air for at least another couple years. I might have also looked for ways to tweak/offend liberals a little bit with it. Let them be offended, as long as they were watching the show while being offended.

          • Brucehenry

            It is already in syndication in some areas. It’s not bad. The Tim Allen character is not cartoonish in any way, although it’s a trifle heavy on the Hillary-bashing very occasionally. The middle daughter is very cute, and is often the focus of the episode.

            All In The Family is one of the two or three best sitcoms of all time. It can be seen on the TV Land network these days, part of their regular line-up.

    • jim_m

      To be honest, there is no good way to get fired. I’ve never seen anyone go away smiling, saying, “Wow, that was really nice of them to fire me in that way.”

      • pennywit

        To be honest, there is no good way to get fired. I’ve never seen anyone go away smiling, saying, “Wow, that was really nice of them to fire me in that way.”

        There’s no good way to get fired, but there are good ways and bad ways to fire a person, if you take my meaning.

        To give an example:

        A friend of mine was dismissed from her job last year. It was a fairly impersonal decision, but her employer did it right. They were restructuring the organization and her position was being eliminated as part of the reorganization. (Although, to be honest, that was in part because my friend had been underperforming). Her employer sent my friend, and others who were being let go, a letter thanking them for their tenure with the organization and an information packet that included details on continuing benefits through COBRA when necessary, a separation agreement, and a HIGHLY detailed severance package document that included several months of pay, an extension of benefits post-termination, and job-hunting counseling.

        That’s a corporate firing, but it’s done the right way. My friend didn’t feel good about her dismissal, but her employer treated her fairly, courteously, and above all, professionally, in letting her go.

        • jim_m

          I’ve seen both good an bad, far more of the bad than of the good. Firings are usually done poorly because the people doing the firing are uncomfortable being the bad guy.

          Having been on both sides I can only say that when you are doing the firing you are the bad guy. Embrace the ugly fact that you cannot be the man in the white cowboy hat and try to do it the right way. Your own discomfort is nothing compared to the person you are firing.

          • pennywit

            I’ve been on both sides, too. I remember just completely feeling like shit when I got fired about 12-15 years ago. I’d put a lot of myself into that job, absolutely loved it … but I screwed up a few times too many, and I had grad-school stress that interfered with my ability to do my job well.

            Looking back, though … first, I learned that I couldn’t tie my personal sense of self-worth to my employer’s opinion. And second … I’m glad that my supervisor had the guts to fire me, to my face, and explain why I was being fired, rather than do it impersonally.

            I’m also thinking about the last time I let somebody go. I and other supervisors had spoken to the person about his conduct several times, and he’d promised to improve … but didn’t. To remove him, I had to send a note to my supervisor, who then sent a note to HR, who then sent a note to me to bring the poor person down to HR for his dismissal.

            I know why my employer made me do it this way — HR is trained on this kind of thing and how to do it without us risking a lawsuit — but I still felt crappy doing it. I really would have preferred to sit the guy down in my office, tell him why he was being dismissed, and do the deed myself. It’s the difference between escorting somebody to an execution and swinging the axe myself. I don’t want to swing the axe. I hate having to do it. But I feel like if it has to be swung, I should be the one to do it.

          • Scalia

            I love it when companies force their employees to sign “at will” employment agreements which means that “either party” may terminate the employment relationship at any time and for any reason, but they flip out when it’s the employee who walks without giving a two-week’s notice. Rather odd behavior when they’ve terminated dozens of employees in the same manner.

          • pennywit

            For screwing employees, check into the Jimmy Johns noncompete agreements that were in the news around 2014-2015. It’s normal, even laudable, to have your high-value employees sign noncompetes, especially if they have company secrets or their biggest asset is relationships with high-dollar clients.

            Jimmy Johns forced their minimum-wage sandwich-makers to sign noncompetes promising not to work at another sandwich shop for two years!! And then they tried to enforce the agreements. There’s something really, really scummy about trying to enforce a noncompete against somebody working a minimum-wage food-service job.

            As I recall, Jimmy Johns agreed to stop making their sandwich artists sign those things as part of a legal settlement.

            Side note: A noncompete actually came with a job I had about eleven years ago (not the same on mentioned above). When I signed my employment agreement, the noncompete’s enforceability was part of my calculus.

    • Well deserved.

  • Paul Hooson

    The Clinton Emails had nothing to do with this. This was just wishful thinking as a cheap 2cent way to impede the Russian ties investigation of some associated with Trump. – This is comparable to Richard Nixon firing Special Prosecutor Archibald Cox. An act of a “Cox shucker” that did nothing to prevent Nixon’s eventual downfall…

    Ethical and good government doesn’t operate like this. But, slimeballs do…

    • Hank_M

      What Trump ties to Russia?
      You’ve been watching Maddow again haven’t you?

    • pennywit

      Shrug. Comey’s certainly given Trump enough legal cover for dismissing him.

    • Vagabond661

      Despite frantic searching there has not been any evidence of a Trump Russian connection. Zip. Zero. Nada. Nothing.

      • Brucehenry

        Yeah if you don’t count changing the GOP platform at the convention regarding Ukraine after slipping Flynn a few tens of thousands of dollars.

        • jim_m

          You sure spell “Trump” in an odd way. Also, can you point to where Flynn had input into the platform?

          BTW, how o you explain Hillary’s involvement in selling off 20% of US uranium reserves? Oh yeah, It’s OK when the left commits treason.

          • Brucehenry

            Long-debunked nonsense

          • jim_m

            Oh, so you are denying that the US sold off the rights to 20% of our uranium reserves? You are a fucking liar and should be banned from this blog.

          • Brucehenry

            And you are a gullible loon

          • jim_m

            Non responsive. THe idea that the Clintons were taking no quid pro quos for their political influence beggars belief. Only the most ideologically blinkered or the most stupid would deny it. That you are doing so demonstrates that there is nothing that you would not lie about to defend and advance your agenda.

          • Scalia

            And more down the pike:

            Bangladesh prime minister says Clinton personally pressured her to help foundation donor:

            While secretary of state, Hillary Clinton made a personal call to pressure Bangladesh’s prime minister to aid a donor to her husband’s charitable foundation despite federal ethics laws that require government officials to recuse themselves from matters that could impact their spouse’s business.

            The Office of Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina confirmed to Circa that Mrs. Clinton called her office in March 2011 to demand that Dr. Muhammed Yunus, a 2006 Nobel Peace prize winner, be restored to his role as chairman of the country’s most famous microcredit bank, Grameen Bank. The bank’s nonprofit Grameen America, which Yunus chairs, has given between $100,000 and $250,000 to the Clinton Global Initiative. Grameen Research, which is chaired by Yunus, has donated between $25,000 and $50,000, according to the Clinton Foundation website.

            “Former US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton telephoned Bangladesh Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina in March 2011 insisting her not to remove Dr. Muhammad Yunus from the post of Managing Director of Grameen Bank,” Deputy Press Secretary Md Nazrul Islam told Circa in an email.

            Islam said the prime minister informed Mrs. Clinton that according to Grameen Bank rules and regulations, nobody can hold the position of the Managing Director of Grameen Bank after the age of 60. He was 70 at the time of his removal and had wrangled for months to no avail with the prime minister over his removal.

            According to the Bangladesh government, Grameen Bank is part of a statutory body of the government and therefore is subject to the banking laws, saying they told Clinton “Dr. Yunus drew salaries and allowances illegally for 10 years.”

            A commission set up by the Bangladesh government also began investigating Grameen Bank in 2012 for financial mismanagement.

            https://uploads.disquscdn.com/images/4ab4e7f50e9f26a027ead6b2196c545e9e7fffbfdf33fa395316743ad9a0f940.jpg

          • jim_m

            Bruce says that it is OK to predate on Bangladesh because they are just ignorant brown skinned people whose lives have no value.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            “Once again: Wizbang should not countenance the obvious lies and fabrications of this dangerous demagogue.”

            Imagine that, Bruce, you’re dangerous.

          • jim_m

            Hey, if what conservatives say is a danger to everyone’s physical safety what you say can be too. Just making you live by your own rules. You don’t like it? Police your own side.

          • Brucehenry

            LOL I thought demagogues had followings

        • Vagabond661

          Link?

          • jim_m

            I think it ironic that Bruce thinks that “a few tens of thousands” paid to a peripheral figure are enough to sway GOP policy but 100s of millions paid directly to the Clintons have zero affect on dem policy.

            Once again: Wizbang should not countenance the obvious lies and fabrications of this dangerous demagogue.

        • Raaron

          You mean changing the wording to exactly match what Obama’s policy was towards providing nonlethal assistance to Ukraine? Was Obama a Russian stooge?

      • Paul Hooson

        So, what about the news of a special prosecutor tonight? This whole mess is a rising tide here…

        • jim_m

          If you want to end the Senate and House investigations into the Russian influence concerns then go ahead. Any special prosecutor will end those investigations immediately. Furthermore, appointing a special prosecutor will ensure that the investigations are carried out outside of the view of the public and that the outcomes are not immediately viewable to the public. Oh, and it will cause this to crag on for another 2-3 years. You can see why the dems are in favor of this, it allows them to demagogue an issue that has already been determined by the organizations investigating it to be bogus.

          But if you want to go appointing special counsels, let’s appoint one to investigate Hillary’s server, and the botched investigation into her violation of the espionage act. Let’s also investigate the Clinton Foundation and the pay to play politics that netted her millions.

          Let’s also appoint a special counsel to look into obama’s spying on domestic enemies and his perversion of the federal bureaucracy so he could oppress political opposition. Let’s see both Bary and Hillary go to prison for a long, long time.

          I’ll bet your appetite for special prosecutors just got a lot less. I know Bruce’s did.

        • jim_m

          Oh, and there is no rising tide here. Any Special Prosecutor would have to be appointed by Rosenstein. You know, the guy who got Comey fired. I’ll bet he really wants to appoint a special prosecutor to investigate how corrupt his decision was.

          You really are a dumbass.

    • jim_m

      Exactly how do you impede an investigation that has gone on for nearly a year and which has failed to develop a single shred of evidence that any collusion occurred?

      Comparisons to Nixon are ignorant and offered by moron conspiracy nuts who are lacking in understanding of both Watergate and the current administration.

    • Wild_Willie
    • Scalia

      Ah, yes. Maybe now we’ll get a real investigation into Clinton’s email scandal…you know…where laws were ACTUALLY broken. Comey didn’t recommend prosecution because they felt that Clinton didn’t have a sweet clue what she was doing. In other words, she broke the law, but Clinton, who is an attorney and who was trained on how to handle classified information, was so incompetent she didn’t know what she was doing.

      Yes, Paul. Let’s now have a real investigation into these CRIMES.

  • jim_m

    Good editorial about the Comey firing in the NY Post today

    Yet Comey could have been fired for other aspects of the Clinton probe. The failure to empanel a grand jury, the willingness to destroy evidence as part of immunity agreements, the absurd claim that no reasonable prosecutor would take the case–each action and assertion suggested a less-than-thorough probe designed to please his Democratic bosses.

    Then there are the leaks of investigations that amounted to a flood of illegal disclosures about the Trump administration. Virtually everything we know about whether anyone in the Trump campaign colluded with Russian meddling in the election comes through leaks.

    Comey had hopelessly politicized the FBI. He was becoming a significant destructive force to the Justice System and the public’s confidence in the ability of the government to deliver accountability and justice.

    For those saying that this is Watergate: It is wishful thinking by dems seeking to relive their glory years and who desire today nothing less than the complete destruction of the republic and to impose a totalitarian rule over the nation.

  • Olsoljer

    Since Congressional Investigation groups have been “stonewalled” for so long, maybe some judicious removal of a few “bricks” IS in order. Similar to shining a light in a dark room and watching the cockroaches panic and run for cover. Some of these roaches wouldn’t hold up so well Koskinen, Comey, Clintons, Kerry, Obama, McCain, Lynch, Lehrner, ad nauseum.

    • jim_m

      I still don’t understand how Koskinen has not been fired, much less put behind bars.

      • Hank_M

        I guess he didn’t “intend” to lie to congress or cover up the IRS abuses.

        More seriously, I hope he’s next to go. And the start of a trend.

  • Wild_Willie
  • pennywit

    I think Politico has a pretty good take on Comey here.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      Fairly well-balanced article.

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Another progressive stand against crime: ICE blasts Montgomery Co. for releasing accused felon despite immigration detainer.

    Poor “undocumented immigrant” – all he did was steal “…a shotgun, AR-15 rifle and ammunition from…a Rockville police car.”

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Holy crap – I think my wife and I might be guilty of yet more “diversity sins.”

    “Tardiness” is cultural, so don’t expect people to be on time, or you, too, will be sinning against “diversity.” This commandment leads to my wife, who is notoriously late, being guilty of cultural appropriation – unless, of course, she is a member of the undefined culture in which “tardiness” is expected.

    In turn, I may be guilty of cultural appropriation if I’m not a member of the undefined culture in which punctuality is expected. [Sigh] It was so much easier when all I had to worry about was my white, male, hetero, patriarchal, abled, Christian privilege.

    • Scalia

      Rape and theft can be cultural too. So can racism.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        Oh, no – I am doomed to diversity hell.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        I would ask for examples, but after pennywit and Jim’s replies, I just don’t think I could bear reading your reply.

        • Scalia

          For Native American Women, Scourge of Rape, Rare Justice. Also, tribes routinely raided and pillaged other tribes before and after the coming of the Europeans.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Well, now you’ve done it. I’m moving my fainting couch to my safe space, filled with puppies and play dough.

    • pennywit

      The acceptability of tardiness is directly proportional to the benefit the person brings to you. If somebody’s making a gazillion dollars a year for your company, but he shows up to work thirty minutes late … probably worth tolerating.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        You are an absolute capitalist pig – tying cultural diversity to $$$ is an mortal sin. Get thee to a nunnery.

        • pennywit

          I am not a capitalist pig. However, the capitalist pigs sign my paychecks.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            And so, you’ve sold your soul.

          • pennywit

            For not nearly enough money.

          • Scalia

            Walter has you pegged: Capitalist

    • pennywit

      “Appropriation” and the difficulty of defining it bugs me. A white guy in a sombrero chugging cervezas on Cinco de Mayo is appropriation, I suppose, but I don’t think it’s really harmful. Meanwhile, the Baylor frat where people dressed as Mexican stereotypes for a party is offensive and racist. I guess it’s appropriation. But I don’t think we need the word “appropriation” when “offensive” and “racist” will do.

      When we get out into the wider culture … the “appropriation” debate is pretty murky, IMO. New culture emerges through synthesis. Elvis Presley was famously dubbed a “white man with a black voice.” Modern rap has space both for Jay-Z and Eminem. And an urban fantasy like the Iron Druid Chronicles or the Dresden Files borrows liberally from European, Asian, and Native American mythos to build new, unique stories.

      • jim_m

        There is no such thing as cultural appropriation. You cannot steal someone’s culture, they still have it. The cries of cultural appropriation are racism straight up.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        Mankind has been “culturally appropriating” since they were sentient beings. It’s called adaptation and progress.

        • pennywit

          I certainly agree with that. This Daily Kos piece is actually pretty thoughtful on the matter. One item sort of jumped out at me:

          Years ago when I was in a humanities program in grad school, one of my classmates was a Native American woman. One day she was seething at a professor, who had done a version of a purification ceremony based on a traditional cleansing ritual, as I remember burning sage. I asked what was troubling her, and I got my first glimpse of anger at people appropriating some of the culture of another. She raged that he had no right to do what he had done. She thought his action trivialized meaningful culture.

          I can certainly see where somebody would object to this kind of thing. As an equivalent, imagine if I, a very nonreligious persion, went to a Christian church and partook of Communion. I’m sure you would find it very insulting. (And, incidentally, on those rare occasions I go to church with extended family, I refuse to join the Communion ritual).

          • Walter_Cronanty

            I would agree if the professor did it in a mocking way – say, like a progressive, atheist professor mocking an exorcism. But, if it was done respectfully, as a way of demonstrating native American religion/beliefs so that the class could understand, I don’t see the moral outrage.

          • pennywit

            I think I’m a little to the side of you here. I can simultaneously think that it’s not appropriative AND acknowledge why a Native American student might find it offensive. I do think the discussion (appropriation or not appropriation) is worth having, as long as people can respect each other.

            I also think minority folk have a legitimate beef with a lot of Hollywood about diversity in movies and on TV programs, and about stereotyping minorities. I’ve read (for example) about Middle Eastern actors who would like to play a variety of roles, but find that producers will only cast them as “Terrorist Number Three.” Similarly, I can certainly understand (and in some cases agree with) irritation about tropes like Mighty Whitey or the Magical Negro.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            If it’s done respectfully, why the offense? Are Native American beliefs now verboten? What else can’t we talk about without causing offense [I know, don’t bother – there’s not enough time or space for that listing]?

          • pennywit

            (Keep mind my own thoughts are not limited to Native American religious rituals).

            I do find some cries of “appropriation” to be, well, offensive. A few years back, HIMYM caught flak from Asian Twitter. To my eye, the episode was simply a take-off on kung fu movies.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            I realize that your thoughts are not limited to Native American religious beliefs, but that is/was the context of our discussion. Thus, your statement that: “I can simultaneously think that it’s not appropriative AND acknowledge why a Native American student might find it offensive” should be thought of as universal. Which leads to my question: “What else can’t we talk about without causing offense…”?
            I have no idea what or who HIMYM is.

          • pennywit

            How I Met Your Mother.

            Honestly, these days, nearly everything is going to offend somebody. I think those of us with better heads on our shoulders (and outside of the ivory tower or the circles where professional umbrage is a thing) can evaluated some of these things ourselves. I do think it’s possible to empathize with somebody without 100 percent agreeing with them, though.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Ah, HIMYM – one of my wife’s favorite shows. I thought it was somewhat entertaining. I didn’t see the episode you reference.

            “Honestly, these days, nearly everything is going to offend somebody.” I guess that, probably 95% of the time, I don’t waste my time trying to empathize or sympathize with someone who wants to curb speech because they’ve taken offense at the inoffensive. If they persist in complaining about be offended, I will sometimes try to explain how there is nothing to be offended about, but that is the extent of intellectual balm.

          • Scalia

            Somebody needs to teach the snowflakes another American virtue: Tolerance

          • pennywit

            There’s a Last Man Standing episode called “Special Snowflakes.”

          • Scalia

            You’re tempting me to check it out!

          • pennywit

            [hulu id=1011358]

            Terns out it’s called “Precious Snowflakes.”

          • Scalia

            Don’t have a Hulu account, and I’m not interested in subscribing, but I found this funny tidbit:
            https://youtu.be/Q-CJ-oHs4SU

          • pennywit

            “Midget warriors” would be kind of awesome … and we had some in the Revolution.

          • Scalia

            Ok, I couldn’t find Precious Snowflakes, but I found another one on ABC’s website. I couldn’t stomach even half of it. Very cheap comedy and empty one-liners. It’s not even close to All in the Family.

          • pennywit

            It has a very similar setup to Family … but I’m not surprised you find Archie Bunker & Co. similar. (BTW, I think you and I have similar objections to modern situation comedies. I really, really dislike cheap humor).

          • pennywit

            “Cheap comedy” is the watchword these days. In terms of “earned laughs” (as opposed to cheap, quick comedy), I think Frasier and How I Met Your Mother are two of the comedies of the last couple decades. Both shows had their weaknesses, of course. But they also both had some great comedy. On Frasier, “The Ski Lodge” remains one of my favorite episodes. There are small laughs along the way, but most of the first two acts set up a series of relationships and miscommunications about those relationships.

            The final act was an over-the-top payoff, culminating in Frasier’s immortal line:

            Wait, wait, wait. Let me see if I’ve got this straight. All the lust coursing through this lodge tonight, all the hormones virtually ricocheting off the walls, and no one… was chasing me?

            How I Met Your Mother got creative with the show’s framing device (forty-something Ted telling his kids how he met their mother). You would sometimes see a flash-forward to (say) two or three years from where the current episode is in the timeline, and comedic payoff was seeing the setup.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            When I taught First Amendment Rights many years ago, my classes were mostly made up of night students – generally, while they weren’t quite as prepared as day students, they’d lived a little and didn’t take kindly to bs. One of the first things I told them [in addition to the fact that I actually flunked people] was that if I didn’t offend them or their beliefs by mid-semester to please tell me so that I wouldn’t leave them out.
            Have mercy, I could never teach now.

          • pennywit

            Ah, HIMYM – one of my wife’s favorite shows. I thought it was somewhat entertaining. I didn’t see the episode you reference.

            Season Nine. “Slapsgiving 3: Slappointment in Slapmarra,” a follow-up to the played-out “slap bet” gag. In a riff on kung-fu movies, it involved Marshall visiting a bunch of martial arts masters (played by HIMYM actors in Asian-style getups) to learn a slapping technique.

            The episode got a lot of blowback Asian-American cultural critics.

            I don’t waste my time trying to empathize or sympathize with someone who wants to curb speech because they’ve taken offense at the inoffensive.

            I tailor my approach to the person. If somebody is approaching from a cultural-criticism angle, I can have a civilized discussion, and maybe even agree with the points a person raises. With one person in particular, it is in my interest to be somewhat more agreeable than normal.

            If a person says something along the lines of “I think XYZ should happen in the future” or “I think that in the future, a work like this ought to focus on a person of color,” I’m perfectly willing to have a dialogue. Hell, a friend and I spitballed an alternate version of Netflix’s Iron Fist at one point.

            (Iron Fist: Rich white guy from America crashes in plane abroad, becomes kung fu master and learns the secret “Iron Fist technique,” returns to America to fight crime. There’s a lot of criticism around Iron Fist to the effect that it’s basically a white guy usurping Asian culture. My friend and i pondered it, and concluded the show could have been more interesting if the main character had been Indian-American. The show could have played up the dichotomy of a second-generation American simultaneously honoring his heritage and assimilating into America).

            If the person talks bans and boycotts, I tend to be pretty blunt. I tell such a person they have a right to be offended, and a right to persuade other people that a piece of speech was offensive (enacting social consequences), but I consider government censorship unacceptable.

            And then comes the accusation of “whitesplaining” and I walk away.

            I will sometimes try to explain how there is nothing to be offended about, but that is the extent of intellectual balm.

            Yeah, for the most part, not worth it.

          • jim_m

            Here’s my concern: You say that some cries of appropriation are offensive. Explain which ones you find not offensive and therefore presumably legitimate. Explain why any claim of cultural appropriation could possibly be legitimate.

          • jim_m

            Explain specifically how culture can be appropriated. Appropriation is defined as : “the action of taking something for one’s own use, typically without the owner’s permission.”

            Define who the “owner” of culture is. Say how one can take culture for your own use and by doing so deprive the “owner” of the right to use that culture.

            This is why the whole notion of cultural appropriation is bullshit. It is nothing more than an expression of intolerant leftism used for the sole purpose of suppressing expression in the most capricious and intolerant of fashions.

          • jim_m

            “She raged that he had no right…”

            She’s an ignorant fascist. He has every right to be rude and insulting or just plain ignorant. She is obviously exercising her right to be and ignorant and intolerant leftist.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        It’s not nice to not believe in cultural appropriation.

        • Scalia

          Canada has been unhinged for some time, and it’s getting worse.

      • Scalia

        I don’t think Elvis ever sounded black. He did sing several songs popularized by black singers (e.g. Hound Dog and So Glad You’re Mine). Sam Phillips wanted a white guy with a “negro sound,” so I guess that’s where it got started.

        Elvis was a fan of gospel, including black gospel and rhythm and blues (which was essentially rock ‘n roll prior to it’s name change). He paid tribute to Fats Domino by trying to sing Blueberry Hill like Fats. Domino, in turn, was a fan of Elvis and sang songs like Love Me:
        https://youtu.be/54sVT4CtmEM

    • jim_m

      Tardiness is cultural/

      Damn straight. Some cultures are simply lazy. There is a reason some have flourished and others have failed, why some are prosperous and others are not. It isn’t about skin color or privilege, it’s about willingness to work and get stuff done.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        “lazy?” “LAZY?” You’ve given me the cultural diversity vapors. I’m off to my fainting couch to say 10 “Hail Gaias”

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Uh oh! FBI searching offices of GOP consulting firm “Strategic Campaign Group.”

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Remember when everyone made fun of that rube Sarah Palin when she said: “drill, baby, drill”?

    Remember when all of our betters nodded sagely in agreement when our oh-so-brilliant Obamessiah proclaimed: “But you and I both know that with only 2% of the world’s oil reserves, we can’t just drill our way to lower gas prices – not when consume 20 percent of the world’s oil.”

  • pennywit

    It’s a Byrd.

  • Vagabond661
    • Walter_Cronanty

      Thankfully, not everyone in US lives in the Ninth Circuit.

      • Time and past time to break the ninth into at least three circuits.

  • Walter_Cronanty

    For your dining and dancing pleasure – well, not really After 500 years, Leonardo da Vinci’s music machine is brought to life

    Rather than plucking the strings, as a harpsichord would, this instrument, called the viola organista, lowers the strings onto spinning wheels which are wrapped in horse hair. This acts as a bow would on a violin. The resulting sound gives the impression of a group of string instruments. The project took Zubrzycki 3 years and 5,000 hours to complete.

    https://youtu.be/JG7qvkGZkug

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Ahh, shit. Now I’ve got to redo my safe space: “Minority students feel ‘marginalized’ by historic building’s ‘imposing, masculine’ paneling”

    Anna Wibbelman, former president of Building a Better Michigan, an organization that voices student concerns about university development, stated at a student government meeting in late March that “minority students felt marginalized by quiet, imposing masculine paneling” found throughout the 100-year-old building, the meeting’s minutes state.