Saramucci: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow (OPEN THREAD)

From FoxNews:

President Trump’s headline-grabbing communications director Anthony Scaramucci was shown the door Monday after just 11 days on the job – as retired Gen. John Kelly took command of the White House staff, moving swiftly to impose order on a West Wing gripped for weeks by infighting.

White House Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders would not confirm reports that Kelly personally requested Scaramucci’s removal — but she made clear that the former Homeland Security secretary now has full control of the staff.

“General Kelly has the full authority to operate in the White House, and all staff will report to him,” Sanders said, adding there are no other anticipated staff shakeups in the works.

Scaramucci’s stint as communications director came with the condition that he would report directly to the president, leaving unclear — until Monday — how he and Kelly would interact.

“Anthony Scaramucci will be leaving his role as White House Communications Director,” the White House said in a terse written statement. “Mr. Scaramucci felt it was best to give Chief of Staff John Kelly a clean slate and the ability to build his own team. We wish him the best.”

Kelly was sworn in just hours earlier Monday as the new White House chief of staff — ironically, stepping into a vacancy that Scaramucci, nicknamed “The Mooch,” played at least some role in creating.

The abrupt decision to remove Scaramucci signals Kelly’s no-nonsense approach to a White House whose inner drama has drawn recent media comparisons to “Survivor” and “Game of Thrones.” The New York Times reported that Kelly sought Scaramucci’s removal.

Wizbang Weekend Caption Contest™
Weekend Caption Contest™ Winners Week of July 28, 2017
  • Scalia

    And a tip from Walter:

    Australia Weather Bureau Caught Tampering With Climate Numbers:

    Australian scientists at the Bureau of Meteorology (BOM) ordered a review of temperature recording instruments after the government agency was caught tampering with temperature logs in several locations.

    Agency officials admit that the problem with instruments recording low temperatures likely happened in several locations throughout Australia, but they refuse to admit to manipulating temperature readings. The BOM located missing logs in Goulburn and the Snow Mountains, both of which are in New South Wales.

    Meteorologist Lance Pidgeon watched the 13 degrees Fahrenheit Goulburn recording from July 2 disappear from the bureau’s website. The temperature readings fluctuated briefly and then disappeared from the government’s website.

    “The temperature dropped to minus 10 (13 degrees Fahrenheit), stayed there for some time and then it changed to minus 10.4 (14 degrees Fahrenheit) and then it disappeared,” Pidgeon said, adding that he notified scientist Jennifer Marohasy about the problem, who then brought the readings to the attention of the bureau.

    The bureau would later restore the original 13 degrees Fahrenheit reading after a brief question and answer session with Marohasy.

    […]

    Bureaus Chief Executive Andrew Johnson told Australian Environment Minister Josh Frydenberg that the failure to record the low temperatures at Goulburn in early July was due to faulty equipment. A similar failure wiped out a reading of 13 degrees Fahrenheit at Thredbo Top on July 16, even though temperatures at that station have been recorded as low as 5.54 degrees Fahrenheit.

    Failure to observe the low temperatures had “been interpreted by a member of the community in such a way as to imply the bureau sought to manipulate the data record,” Johnson said, according to The Australian. “I categorically reject this ­implication.”

    Marohasy, for her part, told reporters that Johnson’s claims are nearly impossible to believe given that there are screen shots that show the very low temperatures before being “quality assured” out. It could take several weeks before the equipment is eventually tested, reviewed and ready for service, Johnson said.

    • Brett Buck

      I read several different accounts of this incident/situation from varying perspectives, and I known with metaphysical certainty that that AGW/”global warming” is a classic and obvious scam. I mean, how many times do you have to get caught faking the data before you give up the con?

      I am much less convinced that this is a case of cooking the books than I am in most of the other cases. From what I have been able to glean, the readings from some thermometer was varying in an abnormal way. This was described poorly in the linked article. I think they were trying to remove data from a thermometer or transmission failure or error, rather than trying to remove damaging evidence. Removing obviously flawed data is a legitimate process for this sort of data sampling (although fraught with risk, as assuming every outlier is wring has led many people astray). It could be as simple as that, rather than a part of the larger conspiracy.

      • Scalia

        I haven’t read other accounts, but Marohasy is not buying Johnson’s denial—at least she’s saying that his “claims” are nearly impossible to believe.

        If it’s a matter of faulty equipment, so be it, but given the data manipulation we’ve seen thus far, it wouldn’t surprise me in the least if they fudged some things here (not saying of course that you’d disagree).

        • Brett Buck

          Of course, they are fudging things all the time. Right now, it’s perfectly obvious that the global warming crowd views every single fact as “evidence”. I am just concerned that we not fall into the same mode, assuming a priori that *any* fact is evidence of a deep, dark, plot.

          That such a conspiracy to fake climate data exists (to support the same old tired globalist/socialist/world government agenda they push in every other way) is essentially proven to any rational standard. So there’s no reason to push marginal/arguable evidence just to preach to the choir, all that does is weaken the overall case. This is not an “A HA!” moment.

          As a group, it would be to our advantage to remain calm, rather than fighting “shrill” with “shrill”. I think that’s what the author might be doing.

          • Scalia

            Good points, as usual, Buck!

          • Walter_Cronanty

            I don’t believe it’s “shrill” to question why official government records are changed without explanation, especially when it is done with some regularity and consistently in one direction:

            For some strange reason that the BOM has been unable to explain, when temperatures go below a certain point it either deletes them as if they had never been – or it enters them into its records at higher temperature than the one actually recorded by its thermometers.

            The dodgy adjustments were spotted by investigative journalist Jennifer Marohasy.

            Earlier this month, she was contacted by bush meteorologist Lance Pidgeon who had noticed that Goulburn, a town south west of Sydney, had smashed its temperature record with a low of -10.4 degrees Celsius.

            “Except, the Bureau has since erased this measurement.

            According to the Bureau’s own rules, the coldest temperature record during a 24-hour period to 9am is recorded as the minimum for that day. So, for Sunday 2 July the carry-over minimum should be -10.4 degrees Celsius. But instead the summary documentation shows -10.0. There is now no public record of -10.4 degrees Celsius.”

            ***
            …[A]gainst the principles of robust science, it refuses to allow its data to be audited independently – or to discuss why or how it makes its temperature adjustments.

            As The Australian notes in a paywalled editorial, these unexplained adjustments are no way to inspire confidence among a taxpaying public which has to fund the BOM to the tune of an annual 365.3 million (2015/16 figures).

          • Jwb10001

            I read today that Al Gore’s electric usage is about 34 times the average person’s and the energy used to heat his pool is about the same as 6 average households. If he’s going to be the face of this movement they can count me out.

  • Scalia

    U.S. Companies Post Profit Growth Not Seen In Six Years:

    America’s largest companies are on pace to post two consecutive quarters of double-digit profit growth for the first time since 2011, helped by years of cost-cutting, a weaker dollar and stronger consumer spending.

    Earnings at S&P 500 companies are expected to rise 11% in the second quarter, according to data from Thomson Reuters, following a 15% increase in the first quarter. Close to 60% of the firms in the index have reported second-quarter results so far.

    Even as activity inside the Beltway bogged down, the markets have been on an almost nonstop rally since the election. The S&P 500 is up 16% since early November and 10% this year.

    The second-quarter profit gains are spread across industries from Wall Street banks to Detroit’s car factories to Silicon Valley’s software labs. Earnings are expected to decline only in the utilities sector, according to data from Thomson Reuters. ​

    Several factors are at work, analysts and economists say. A weaker dollar has made it easier to sell U.S.-made goods overseas and has kept borrowing costs low. U.S. wages have improved enough to help bolster consumer spending without raising employer labor costs so much to dent the bottom line.

    • WHO’S THE BUSTER

      U.S. auto sales have been declining for seven straight months, the worst performance since 2009 (when they were virtually bankrupt).

      • Scalia

        Yes, a doughnut has a hole in it.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        “There’s no denying the ongoing drop in auto sales, but this is a drop from record levels to near-record levels, unlike what happened in 2009,” Karl Brauer, executive publisher for Kelley Blue Book, said in an email….

        July US auto sales declined significantly, but it was a slip from the unsustainable pace of almost 18 million in yearly total sales in July 2016.

        Profitable trucks and SUVs are selling well, while low-margin passenger cars are sliding.

        • Remarkable what a little context does to a story.

          Is busted our very own Amos Burton?

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Yes, context does help. But, who the hell is “Amos Burton?”

          • Engineer, mechanic, gunslinger, amoral thug. “A man without context…”

            Character in James S. A. Corey’s The Expanse.

            Though now that I reflect on it, he’s better socialized than our “busted.”

      • Retired military

        WHat happened in 2009? Oh yeah the defunct and broken clunker program by Obama which did nothing to help the economy and actually hurt poor people all in the name of “climate change”

      • Jwb10001

        Wow you found a piece of bad news ? Were you always so keen to point out the down side of Econ news when it was Obama’s economy that drove that work force participation rate in to the ditch? Or when Obama’s shame “affordable” healthcare BS drove cost through the roof? Thanks for playing the role of troll to perfection

    • pennywit

      I’ve seen journalism and analysis indicating that wages haven’t kept up with this profit growth,. generally because of an economic hangover from 2008. (Employees afraid to ask for raises or find new jobs, while employers believed they were offering fair wages and not willing to make better offers).

      But in the last six months or so, I’ve heard from friends in a few industries that the labor market is SERIOUSLY tightening up.

      My wild-ass prediction: I think that pretty soon we’re going to see a good-sized wage bump in the skilled blue-collar fields.

      • WHO’S THE BUSTER

        It has already happened. Hundreds of turbine and diesel mechanic jobs are currently unfilled and they offer over $100,000 a year. Germany saw this problem coming so they offer free education in selected disciplines. Are they doing it to be humanitarian? Of course not, it is simply good business. We have an aging demographic, which can be economically disastrous (see Japan), training our young people to perform profitable tasks is essential.

        I think of this every time I drive through the air force base I mentioned last week. It is the size of Montana and has fifty empty four bedroom colonials (which are simply falling apart due to neglect) along with lakefront condos that are ninety percent empty. It also has at least 40 large buildings that are mostly vacant. Many were classrooms for training. They have a railroad, gas station, a medical facility and a bank. All of this to support 10 Warthogs and 3 tankers (the outstanding golf course is simply a bonus). Everyone knows it is nothing but pork and it has come close to being vacated on numerous occasions.

        The land cannot be used for anything else due to the exorbitant cost of making it consistent with environmental regulations.

        It would make a great training facility for the aforementioned unfilled jobs, along any number of vocational training curriculums. I know, it makes too much sense.

        Why is it that we are rearranging the deck chairs on the Titanic to save 300 and change billions on healthcare over 10 years (because as Trump acknowledged during the campaign, provider costs are the problem), but never question military spending? As I mentioned last week, they use rent-a-cops to check my Defense Department ID on the way into the facility. Isn’t guard duty something that falls under the job description of the military (along with perhaps painting the colonials so they don’t simply rot away)? This is especially relevant as all five branches of the service have a foothold on the base, which is rare.

        Well, luckily we spent millions to outfit the Afghan military with new uniforms with a nice forest theme. Yup, they will be hard to spot in a country with virtually no trees. I always wonder why we don’t closely audit the military. Wouldn’t that be a very Trumpian way of doing things? He is supposed to be a businessman, where the bottom line of everything should be in play. Stop making new tanks that the army doesn’t even want, but instead invest in cyber warfare, which is cheaper and will most likely be the next theater of war. Trump has done a lot of symbolic things that have his core all excited, now start performing like a businessman that has everyone’s interests at heart.

        • Talked with a local heavy-equipment company recruiter – he says they’re hurting like anything for diesel and heavy equipment mechanics. And they’ll pay pretty well while training – with a $70k/yr job to start. For someone fresh out of high school, they can make pretty good money.

          Of course, they’ll never be one of the ‘elite’ on the coasts if they go that route.

          Just well-employed, and able to save a shitload of money.

          Just sayin’ Mike Rowe’s got it right. College isn’t the best route for everyone, and the world is going to need plumbers and others who can do the dirty jobs necessary to keep the lights on and the water coming.

          • pennywit

            with a $70k/yr job to start

            If I take my salary and subtract the student loan payments and (more importantly) my realistic potential salary in my field, the equipment operator looks pretty damn smart.

        • Walter_Cronanty

          Maybe we should make vocational training free, instead of college.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            Sounds good to me, although I don’t know where that free college is located.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            “Let’s … make debt-free college available to everyone. … And let’s liberate the millions of Americans who already have student debt.”

            Hillary, June 22, 2016

          • pennywit

            We shouldn’t make squat “free.” But I think there’s merit to adding a vo-tech element and/or the first two years of college to the guarantee of a taxpayer-funded education.

          • Retired military

            I think that classes like Math, Hard science, computer science (not gaming theory) and hard core medical (not pychairist, psycologist, human studies, etc etc) have a place with some taxpayer help. All the rest of the crap to include diversity studies, AA women orgasm in traditional racist films, why mommy doesn’t love mommy anymore, What happens when daddy becomes mommy and mommy becomes daddy, my dog the transgender of the family, crap should be paid for by the student with no govt aid at all going towards it.

          • pennywit

            I don’t know that I agree with this. A couple points to ponder:

            1) I think it’s worth providing taxpayer funding for all of the first two years, which is mostly general education requirements and partially the first couple courses in a student’s major. I don’t think there’s much harm in paying for a three-hour course called American Feminists or Introduction to Psychology — in fact, there’s a LOT of good information students can learn in those sorts of classes. And I think there’s certainly value in ensuring the kids take Freshman Comp and some basic stat or other college math.

            2) I strongly disagree with your classification of psychiatry and psychology. Those disciplines are quite closely related to medicine — depression, substance abuse, and so forth can seriously affect a person’s physical health, and vice versa.

          • pennywit

            One more thing. I know that mental-health counseling (both psychiatry and psychology) has been of immense help to veterans, both with PTSD and without, who are having trouble adjusting to life in the United States after being abroad in combat zones. I’ve also known people who have dealt with substance abuse and depression … and mental health treatment literally saved their lives. So I’m not inclined toward disrespect for those fields.

          • My Uncle paid to teach me how to operate, maintain, and repair just about all of the peripheral equipment for a PWR plant, and I haven’t used it in decades. Then again he also paid for my college… A route that remains for those who are interested and willing to work.

        • Retired military

          “Let’s … make debt-free college available to everyone. … ”
          Lets make it so colleges can only charge for a degree whatever the average annual salary of those personnel in that degree are making for that year. You will see a lot of fluff disappear.

        • pennywit

          I have no idea what I just read.

      • Retired military

        “But in the last six months or so, I’ve heard from friends in a few industries that the labor market is SERIOUSLY tightening up.’
        Gee what occurred about 6 months ago? Let me see. Oh yeah Obama left office and Trump took over. You think maybe there is a coincidence.

    • pennywit

      I hope this is a solid recovery.

      • It would be a challenge for this recovery to be as weak and pathetic as the “recovery” during the prior mal-administration.

  • Scalia

    Top Republican congressman calls for Mueller to resign as special counsel:

    A senior Arizona congressman is calling on Robert Mueller, special counsel for the Justice Department’s investigation into Russia’s election meddling, to resign.

    Rep. Trent Franks, a Republican who sits on the House Judiciary Committee, said in a statement Tuesday that Mueller is in violation of the law that prohibits Mueller from serving as a special counsel if he has a conflict of interest.

    Mueller and former FBI Director James Comey have been longtime allies dating back to 2003 when the men both worked in Washington, Mueller as the FBI Director and Comey as Deputy Attorney General. Franks cited the pair’s relationship as a reason for Mueller to be disqualified from the probe.

    “Bob Mueller is in clear violation of federal code and must resign to maintain the integrity of the investigation into alleged Russian ties,” Franks said. “Those who worked under them have attested he and Jim Comey possess a close friendship, and they have delivered on-the-record statements effusing praise of one another.

    President Trump had also called Mueller’s relationship with Comey “bothersome.”

    Franks also cited reports that Mueller hired at least three lawyers who have donated exclusive to Hillary Clinton as well as a bevy of other Democrats.

    “Until Mueller resigns, he will be in clear violation of the law, a reality that fundamentally undermines his role as Special Counsel and attending ability to execute the law,” Franks said.

  • Scalia

    White Privilege? How About Cognitive Privilege?

    There are many kinds of privilege besides white privilege: cognitive privilege, for example. We now know that intelligence is not something we have significant control over but is something we are born with. We are living in a society in which success is increasingly linked to one’s intelligence. This is not to say that intelligence is the only factor that is important. All that is implied is that below a certain threshold of intelligence, there are fewer and fewer opportunities. These opportunities are being shifted upward to jobs that require heavier cognitive lifting or else are being replaced by robots. Thus, the accident of having been born smart enough to be able to be successful is a great benefit that you did absolutely nothing to earn. Consequently, you have nothing to be proud of for being smart.

    Once we have admitted the reality of privilege itself and identified some species of privilege, we are better able to talk about the temperature-rising topic of racial privilege.

    The lunacy doesn’t stop.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      Fortunately, academia is working so effectively on cognitive diversity that one cannot tell the difference between a fourth grade education and a PhD in Womyn’s Studies.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        Honestly, before I posted the above comment, I did not read this at Ace of Spades HQ:

        Kevin’s mission is to facilitate conversations around the intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class through pop culture analysis and storytelling; conversations that confront, question, and attempt to undo mainstream Amerika’s racist and heterosexist status quo.

        ***

        He aims to use various privileges afforded him via his own identity to celebrate and center black feminist writing and cultural production in order to show diverse audiences why seeing the world through an intersectional feminist lens is essential for all.

        Born and raised in Logan, UT, Kevin holds a B.S and M.A. in American Studies and M.Phil in Women’s and Gender Studies. He has worked as a call-center operator, fast-food cook, touring singer/songwriter, librarian, writing tutor, student organizer, nonprofit grant-writer, office assistant, and college professor, among other things. In 2010, he created a Politicizing Beyonce curriculum for college students that received world-wide media attention. Since then, he’s taught the curriculum in University classrooms and traveled the world with speaking events — recognized by Beyonce herself and her team. He currently lives in Brooklyn, NY with his boyfriend.

      • Walter_Cronanty

        I had not read this from Powerline, either:

        …[T]he Swarthmore Anti-Capitalist Collective (SACC) has disbanded because it was too white and middle class. Campus Reform noted that SACC’s now-dormant Facebook page agonized that “SACC’s fundamental failure” was that “at its formation, it was made up of entirely white, with the exception of one person of color, students,” and to make matters worse, “not one of [the founding members] are from low-income and/or working class backgrounds. . . low-income people of color should never be an afterthought in a group whose politics supposedly focus on their liberation.”
        ***
        Evergreen College pledges to train students not to discriminate against white people

        I, for one, am anxious to see the training manual.

    • pennywit

      The link didn’t work. Are you sure this wasn’t a poe? Or was it an argument for a living wage?

  • Scalia

    Lynch elementary schools will lose the ‘Lynch’ due to racial implications:

    The national movement to change racially offensive names of buildings, sports teams and landmarks will soon touch a group of schools in southeast Portland. Lynch Meadows, Lynch Wood and Lynch View elementary schools will shed their “Lynch” before the upcoming school year in response to growing concern about the word’s racial connotations.

    The schools, part of the Centennial School District, were named for the Lynch family, which donated land over a century ago to build the first of the schools. But Centennial Superintendent Paul Coakley says many newer families coming into the district associate the name with America’s violent racial history.

  • Scalia

    #NoConfederate campaign against HBO slave drama takes off:

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A social media campaign to derail HBO’s planned modern-day Southern slavery drama quickly caught fire, prompting the cable channel to ask detractors to withhold judgment until they see “Confederate.”

    The campaign, with “OscarsSoWhite” activist April Reign among its organizers, asked people to tweet to HBO with the hashtag “NoConfederate” during Sunday’s broadcast of the channel’s “Game of Thrones.”

    “Game of Thrones” is produced by David Benioff and D.B. Weiss, who are developing the recently announced “Confederate.” The pair, who are white, will work on “Confederate” with husband-and-wife Malcolm Spellman (“Empire”) and Nichelle Tramble Spellman (“The Good Wife”), who are black writer-producers.

    Reign tweeted Sunday night that #NoConfederate rapidly shot to the top ranks of Twitter both nationally and internationally. It didn’t take long for HBO to respond to the campaign that amplified earlier criticism of the project.

    “We have great respect for the dialogue and concern being expressed around ‘Confederate,’” the channel said in a statement. “We have faith that Nichelle, Dan, David and Malcolm will approach the subject with care and sensitivity. The project is currently in its infancy so we hope that people will reserve judgment until there is something to see.”

    In announcing “Confederate” earlier this month, HBO described the story as following “a broad swath of characters on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Demilitarized Zone,” including freedom fighters, politicians, abolitionists and executives of a slave-holding conglomerate.

    A backlash quickly followed, including from writer Roxane Gay (“Hunger,” ″Difficult Women”). Her July 25 opinion piece for The New York Times carried the headline, “I Don’t Want to Watch Slavery Fan Fiction.”

    “It is curious that time and again, when people create alternate histories, they are largely replicating a history we already know, and intimately,” Gay wrote. “They are replicating histories where whiteness thrives and people of color remain oppressed.”

    Last week, HBO programming president Casey Bloys acknowledged missteps in how it announced the drama series but defended its value.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      “Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past.”
      And I thought “1984” was a cautionary tale.

      • It is for us. The communists & fascists are the ones who treat it as a “how to” manual.

    • pennywit

      Hm. I think it’s entirely appropriate to demand HBO handle slavery carefully in the series. But I’m not comfortable with people trying to get HBO to not air the series in the first place. Why not wait for the series and see if it’s any good first?

      As to the cultural issues … While in this country, the experience of being a slave or descended from slaves is largely unique to African-Americans, slavery’s cultural legacy, including segregation, the civil rights struggle and the Civil War, is a part of every American’s cultural heritage. I don’t think you can credibly restrict someone from writing about it simply because of his race.

      • WHO’S THE BUSTER

        The Man in the High Castle has the Nazis and Japanese running a fictional America, key word, fictional.

        By the way, it is quite popular and is entering its third season.

        Next thing you know they will have a comedy set in a WWII POW camp.

        • Scalia

          It’s popular among some left-wingers because they like to imagine Trump as the Nazi who’s ruling Amerika.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            Never heard that before.

          • Scalia

            That means they don’t exist, right?

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            No, I have just never heard that theory, heck there is no shortage of people that still think the Earth is flat, so anything is possible. I simply find it surprising because when the show premiered in January of 2015 Trump had not even announced any intention of running. In other words, it had months of popularity long before Trump was even newsworthy and I don’t know that anyone could identify if the show appealed to the left or right.

            I would just be curious as to where this Trump/High Castle theory has been discussed because it never crossed my mind and it would be quite the reach considering the ongoing plot and characters on the show. Even now I can’t imagine anything analogous.

          • Scalia

            The Man In The High Castle makes a timely return:

            Not much time has passed in the world of The Man In The High Castle between seasons one and two, but in our world, it’s a whole different story. Last fall, Donald Trump was anything but sure bet to secure the Republican nomination, let alone the presidency. Now many of us feel like we’ve woken up in an alternate universe dystopia, where white nationalism is on the rise and democracy itself is in peril. As an organic piece of viral marketing for a series about an America under the thumb of the Axis powers, it’s a bit too on-the-nose. The actual marketing campaign for High Castle’s second season was no doubt in the works before the election results were known, but that doesn’t make it any more comforting to see Manhattan draped in banners bearing the image of the Statue of Liberty giving the Nazi salute.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            Found one, heh? Well, I’m convinced.

          • Scalia

            Oh, you wanted me to find, say, 50 examples? Tough, you idiot. If you want more, go look for them yourself.

            BTW, I didn’t have to “find” that one. I read it months ago.

          • Scalia

            Besides, one can see where a series like that will go. The Nazis will be defeated, and everybody will live happily ever after.

          • Amazing the things the willingly blinded fail to see.

          • pennywit

            It’s popular among some left-wingers because they like to imagine Trump as the Nazi who’s ruling Amerika.

            You mean DU lied to me? The bastards!

          • pennywit

            The Super Sarcastro Size, of course.

          • When I first glanced at your reply I read it as:

            The Super Castrado Size

            I can’t think why.

      • Scalia

        Exactly. I also wondered why people were objecting to a show they haven’t seen.

        • pennywit

          I feel the same way about some of the folks who erupted after the first Star Trek : Discovery trailer to criticize it for a lack of white males in the main cast. Let the movie or TV show come out, then judge.

          That said, I was a little disappointed this past year that Marvel’s Iron Fist decided to cast Danny Rand as a white guy from New York who learned martial arts from hidden monks. The show touched on the differences between his upbringing with the hidden monks and his existence back in the mortal world of New York City. I think they could have explored this dualism more fully if they had cast him as a second-generation immigrant trying to find his own identity in a balance between his parents’ culture and American culture.

          • Retired military

            Try looking at the storyline. Danny Rand was caucasion way back in the 70s when the comic first came out. Half of the storyline is the fact that he wasn’t oriental.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Fist_(comics)

          • pennywit

            Oh, I’m pretty damn familiar with the comic storyline. But nothing says that the TV makers have to follow the comics slavishly.

          • Retired military

            If you look at the comic industry you will realize that their sidetrack into the diversity arena has just about bankrupted it.
            In short, diversity doesn’t sell in the real world unless the democrats are making someone else foot the bill.

          • pennywit

            When you put comic book characters in live-action movies, some of them have to be their original race from the comic books. Luke Cage, Josiah X, and Isaiah Bradley, for example, don’t work well if the characters are not African-Americans. Their storylines are intertwined with their race. But other characters — Iron Fist, for example, or Rolan Deschain — can work well no matter what race they are in live-action media.

            Actually, when I thought about Iron Fist, my first thought was that an Indian actor would have been appropriate, and then making his company a conglomerate with offices in both Hyderabad and New York. I’m not thinking about diversity for the sake of diversity, but also for the story possibilities that this would open.

      • Retired military

        “I think it’s entirely appropriate to demand HBO”
        The only people who should be able to demand HBO do anything are
        a. Its consumers (who pays for HBO). if they don’t like what is on it they can cancel the service.
        b. Its shareholders (if a is unhappy then b generally follows suit)
        and
        c. The FCC (is as far as does the item produced meet federal guidelines and standards.
        I don’t remember leftist saying ABC (Or was it CBS or NBC) get demanded by anyone (other than the above 3 groups) when they put on shows like Roots or say Django

        • pennywit

          Part of the campaign is trying to convince consumers to cut their HBO service if Confederate isn’t canceled.

          • Can’t cut what I don’t got, lol….

          • Scalia

            Me, too. I fall into the “never a subscriber” category.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            Never a subscriber?

            I consider Deadwood, the Sopranos and the Wire to be among the best television shows of all time. In fact, I just watched the final season of the Wire again last week. It is generally considered to be the worst season and it was still great television that both entertains, but also informs. While set in Baltimore, it could easily be any urban city.

            Just off the top of my head and maybe in this order. Oddly there is a lot of crossover with David Simon, David Milch, David Chase and Matthew Weiner working on a number of them. Wow, that is a lot of Davids.

            The Wire
            The Sopranos (maybe should be first for no other reason than it kind of invented cable series television)
            Deadwood

            Justified
            Mad Men
            Rockford Files
            NYPD Blue
            Breaking Bad
            Homicide Life on the Streets
            Friday Night Lights
            The Larry Sanders Show
            Seinfeld
            Cheer
            OZ
            Law and Order (maybe this should be higher as you can catch an episode at any time and it is generally entertaining).

            If I go way back, I guess the Twilight Zone, the Honeymooners and of course Ed Sullivan, yeah yeah, yeah.

            So what is wrong with most of my list? Women generally hate all of those shows.

          • Scalia

            I’m way too busy to be fooling with that stuff. My entertainment is very limited.

          • Retired military

            Watched like the first season of deadwood. Lost interest.
            Same for Justified.
            NYPD blue I loved.
            OZ watched it.
            Law and order SVU I like
            Twilight zone – classic
            Same with honeymooners.
            The rest of the stuff I never watched and had no interest in.

          • You might consider re-visiting Justified.

            The writing was very good in terms of plot, dialogue, and character development. They also used their musical selections as plot devices and clues.

            This one was used with increasing frequency as the show progressed.

            My lady referred to the show as the Haarlan Killbillies.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            Loved the Americana music they played. I have looked up some of the music to learn about more of their output. Love the title song by Cage the Elephant.They would also sample Lucinda Williams (one of my favorites), Rodney Crowell, James McMurtry and Ray Wylie Hubbard.

          • pennywit

            You’re missing out. Six Feet Under had possibly the third-best series finale (last few minutes) I’ve ever seen. Deadwood was poetic in its profanity. Really good stuff in their catalogue.

          • Scalia

            To show you how little I follow that, I don’t have a sweet clue what Six Feet Under is.

          • pennywit

            Here are the last 10 minutes of the series finale. It’s wonderfully staged.

          • Scalia

            Oh, please. I just got around to viewing this—and you show a gay marriage??

            Yes, I’m very glad I’m in the “never a subscriber” category. I don’t watch garbage.

          • pennywit

            Well, yes, gay marriage was part of the show. But that’s ancillary to why I like this clip. Mostly, I think the concept works well. The show was all about death and preparing for death. This clip was a flash-forward, showing us how each of the main characters died. Thematically, it tied very well with the show.

          • Retired military

            Every time calamity jane spoke she said the F word. Sometimes repeatedly in the same sentence.

          • pennywit

            It was awesome.

          • Retired military

            Gee sounds like liberals trying to get sponsers to not buy commercials on Fox.

          • pennywit

            Oh, everyone has freedom of speech. Mostly, I’m razzing you because I can.

        • pennywit

          Besides, last time I checked, we have the right in this country to demand whatever we want. Or do you not believe in freedom of speech?

          • What you don’t have is the “right” to coerce someone into listening to you or caring about what you say.

          • Retired military

            Oh I believe in it. I just don’t believe that MOST liberals.
            a. want someone who disagrees with them to have free speech.
            b. don’t understand that free speech doesn’t imply that someone has to hear and agree with what they are saying.

          • pennywit

            Today’s college students have trouble with this concept, not to mention the difference socially enforced speech codes and government-enforced speech does.

    • pennywit

      Incidentally, Amazon is developing a series about a group of freed slaves who take over several Southern states after the Civil War and establish their own country. I’m interested in both that series and HBO’s Confederate.

      • Scalia

        I think folks are trying to cash in on High Castle’s success.

  • Scalia

    FILE THIS IN THE “WE TOLD YOU THIS WOULD HAPPEN” CATEGORY:

    Man ‘marries’ his laptop, sues for state recognition and a wedding cake:

    Chris Sevier says that if same-sex couples are able to get married and demand that Christian bakers make them wedding cakes, then he should be allowed to marry his laptop and demand a cake to celebrate the union between one man and one machine.

    The self-identified “machinist” says he married his laptop in a ceremony in New Mexico, and now he has sued to demand that a Colorado baker — who is already in court after refusing to bake for a same-sex marriage — must be compelled to make cakes for him and his computer “bride.” He also has filed a lawsuit demanding that Utah recognize his man-object marriage.

    It’s the latest battlefront in an increasingly thorny area of law, after the U.S. Supreme Court in 2015 established a constitutional right to same-sex marriage.

    While legal analysts said the case is a stretch, a judge in Utah has allowed part of that lawsuit to proceed, and analysts concede that Mr. Sevier’s claims get to the heart of how far the 2015 Obergefell ruling stretches when it comes to nontraditional unions.

    “If marriage based on self-asserted sex-based identity narratives is a ‘fundamental right,’ ‘individual right,’ ‘existing right,’ based on a ‘personal choice’ for homosexuals, then clearly it is also a ‘fundamental right,’ ‘individual right,’ ‘existing right,’ based on a ‘personal choice’ for polygamists, zoophiles and machinists,” Mr. Sevier and several self-identified polygamists said in their lawsuit against Masterpiece Cakeshop, the Colorado baker they are challenging.

    • Walter_Cronanty

      I’ll give you my wedding cake when you pry it from my crumb covered hands.

    • pennywit

      This lawsuit is clearly ridiculous, given the state of artificial intelligence right now.

      That said, I wonder where the law will go when AI does become smart enough to exercise free will.

      • Scalia

        It is clearly ridiculous in the sense that gay marriage was clearly ridiculous not too long ago. We have set legal precedent by allowing individuals to fundamentally change the definition of marriage under the rubric of “equal protection.” That has opened the door for stuff like this, and there is no logical stopping point.

      • Retired military

        Who knows what will happen when all the AI starts identifying as real people and demand that its feelings be protected.

        • pennywit

          Honestly … if AI reaches the level of cognition we see depicted in, say, R. Daneel Olivaw, then I think we would have to evaluate our approach to whether an AI deserves rights.

          • Scalia

            But we are already there irrespective of where AI goes. “Marriage” may be redefined on the basis of Equal Protection, so it is irrelevant whether AI can exercise free will.

  • Scalia
    • pennywit

      I hate crap like this.

      • Brett Buck

        If so, I would have to question your concept of a “cultural legacy” as you discussed above. My “cultural legacy” is dealing with things I have done or encounter in my life, not what some other people who I cannot identify and have never met did 150 years ago.

        The only “cultural legacy” that people in the US share are the concepts of formation, primarily that natural law is the basis of justice and that personal liberty/independence is a right held by every human being. I find that difficult to reconcile with the poster above, and your take on slavery as a “cultural legacy” of all Americans in the year 2017.

        • pennywit

          To me, a cultural legacy is all sorts of things bounded up in history, arts, etc., etc.

          If anything at all, the American “cultural legacy” regarding slavery is that a large fraction of the population found it objectionable on both a basis of religious morality and as a point of violation of natural law, built strength, and then committed their every effort to eliminate it, despite it being part of human society since prehistory (at least 5000 years, and almost certainly much longer).

          I would say the American cultural legacy encompasses both sides of the coin — both people who fought against slavery, and people who fought to preserve it.

          • jim_m

            Why yes, the legacy is naturally from the people who the nation spent hundreds of thousands of lies to defeat. It isn’t the victors who define the nation, it is the losers from the civil war.

            What a despicable idea.

        • pennywit

          Also, please keep in mind that there’s a long distance between simply acknowledging history (and viewing current events in light of that history) and publicly nailing yourself to a cross like the folks in the picture.

          • Brett Buck

            That point is fully conceded!

          • Pity they did not commit seppuku.

          • pennywit

            I don’t think many people would have the stomach to commit seppuku. Cutting out your own innards, then writing an epic poem about it. Brr.

        • Walter_Cronanty

          Well said. Too many people forget that our ethnic majority fought its bloodiest war largely for the benefit of an ethnic minority. Name another country that’s done that.

          • Brett Buck

            Moreover, we did it entirely on the basis of principle and the notion of the “right” thing on moral standards.

            Nobody has ever seriously asked for a Gold Star or any other deference for having done it. It was the right thing to do – completely independent of the cost, the loss of life, or any possible reward. No one owes or expect any thanks.

            But, by the same token, I and everyone else should categorically reject the concept of “white privilege” or any suggestion that the USA is somehow fundamentally liable for some “original sin” caused by slavery. As far as I can tell, once the country was done tossing out King George and his representatives, slavery was eliminated as soon as it was plausibly possible despite very strong economic motives to keep it.

            I would also note that the same crew pushing this nonsensical “original sin”/critical race theory are also pushing identity politics. Ironically, or maybe predictably, this largely consist of trying to break people in to groups along facile lines of race and culture – effectively, segregating people along racial lines. Listen carefully – they never use the word “equality” any more.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Again, well said.

          • pennywit

            Nobody has ever seriously asked for a Gold Star or any other deference for having done it. It was the right thing to do – completely independent of the cost, the loss of life, or any possible reward. No one owes or expect any thanks.

            You could write entire books about what happened and the why of it. And many people have.

            But, by the same token, I and everyone else should categorically reject the concept of “white privilege”

            I caught a lot of shit and got lectured about my lack of self-awareness recently because i refused to abide by the “check your privilege” rules. I do think there’s something to the notion that there’s an element of racial/class/whatever privilege in this country. But some left-wing folks think that if you happen to be white, or economically privileged, or whatever, then you don’t get to have an opinion on an issue unless it agrees with the orthodoxy.

          • Brett Buck

            Motivations aside, the (probably) 10,000 years tradition of slavery was gone shortly after the forming of the country, due to the efforts of the majority

            I caught a lot of shit and got lectured about my lack of self-awareness recently because i refused to abide by the “check your privilege” rules. I do think there’s something to the notion that there’s an element of racial/class/whatever privilege in this country. But some left-wing folks think that if you happen to be white, or economically privileged, or whatever, then you don’t get to have an opinion on an issue unless it agrees with the orthodoxy.

            This reflects their own ignorance and is the hallmark characteristic of the modern, mindless, leftist. I don’t believe anyone should be judged for the action of their ancestors, but, even granting that, I sure as hell don’t see anything to apologize for.

          • pennywit

            Thise reflects their own ignorance and is the hallmark characteristic of the modern, mindless, leftist. I don’t believe anyone should be judged for the action of their ancestors, but, even granting that, I sure as hell don’t see anything to apologize for.

            Do you think it’s fair for somebody to say, “I don’t think you’ve experienced racial discrimination. My friends and I have. Here’s what it was like. And this is why we think this policy is needed.”

          • pennywit

            Addendum: My personal stance on the “white privilege” or “male privilege” stance is something along the lines of this: Yes, the fact that I am white/male/cisgendered/straight/whatever has some effect on my opinions and where I am in life. I am certainly open to hearing other points of view. But I reserve the right to adopt, or reject those points of view, at my discretion. Some people can’t handle that.

          • jim_m

            White privilege is based on the idea that white people are given advantages based on their skin color. In practice it is the assignment of certain beliefs about the individual and their character based on that individual’s skin color.

            In other words, “white privilege” is the very essence of racism. Anyone claiming that it is real is by admission a bigot.

          • pennywit

            Wow. Name calling and categorical denials. And of course folks here will give you approbation. I repeat my challenge to you. Take your act, go to a liberal leaning blog and see what happens.

          • jim_m

            Done it before. Per Bruce’s request. It’s tiresome

          • jim_m

            White privilege is actually middle class privilege. Recently, the left has finally come out and declared that they want to see th emiddle class destroyed. THat is the truth.

            Blacks, Hispanics, Indians, Middle Easterners, Asians, all benefit from the same middle class privilege. You only hate it when white people get those benefits.

            It’s racism.

          • jim_m

            I see that you have no response to my contention that what you call white privilege is also found for all races in the middle class.

            Perhaps you would feel better about yourself if you hadn’t supported policies that over the last 50 years have decimated the black middle class and if you didn’t currently offer unthinking devotion to a party that currently says that what is wrong with the US is the middle class and that it should be eliminated.

            Perhaps if your whole character were not formed around racist and racialist ideas you would be able to see the truth, but you want to find the racism in your heart in everyone else. So you do. It’s sad really. And rather than engage to discuss you spill your bile on everyone else.

          • pennywit

            I see that you have no response to my contention that what you call white privilege is also found for all races in the middle class.

            Real life takes precedence over the Internet, buddy. And today real life means “pick up family member from hospital and spend time with that family member.” But, yes, I get it. You’re jealous that I’m spending time with someone else.

            But that’s neither here nor there, is it?

            Now, as far as privilege goes … there is a certain economic aspect to privilege, yes. And “white privilege” is a joke when you’re a white factory worker out of work because the town’s main employer packed up and left.

            However, I’ve talked enough to people of other races — people in my social/economic stratum — that I know their race has led them to experience a different America than I have. And that experience has shaped their opinions. I don’t necessarily agree with their opinions. But I acknowledge they come from a fundamentally different place than I do, and I should be willing to listen to them.

            And rather than engage to discuss you spill your bile on everyone else.

            No, I just spill bile on you. Because you’re special.

          • jim_m

            My father, who turned 90 last week, was just discharged from the hospital with a diagnosis of leukemia, so you can fuck off you worthless piece of shit.

            I don’t give a shit about your family situation because you use it as an excuse for your vile behavior and somehow think you are special because your family member is ill. Clue phone: everyone deals with this. You aren’t special because of it.

          • pennywit

            Sounds like I touched a nerve, kid. About time something got a rise out of you.

          • jim_m

            No. I do not

          • You are referred to the dictionary, between the entries for “shit” and “syphilis.”

          • pennywit

            One more thing .. .I find your charges of “vile behavior” hypocritical. I’ve been more than patient with you, usually polite or completely ignoring you. In return, you’ve thrown insult at me over the time I’ve been here. Most memorably, I recall that after some disagreement, you started calling me “pussy.” Not exactly being nice, eh, Jim?

            So don’t get pissy just because I’ve decided to throw a little bit back at you. You have no justification.

          • Scalia

            Very sorry to hear about your dad, Jim.

          • Scalia

            There are not a lot of things that leftists can handle, but to argue that my beliefs are suspect because of my skin color is racist. They are not simply arguing that economic status makes my opinions suspect (because other races occupy that zone too), so the “white” tag is designed to dismiss views based on race. Anybody opposed to racism should reject it root and branch.

          • pennywit

            As I said above, I have no patience for people who dismiss ideas based on a person’s race, or who try to shut down dissenting views with “check your privilege.” But if somebody comes from a different perspective — and his perspective is framed by his race, class, or other characteristic different from mine, what does it harm me to listen to them? And how would such a listening harm you?

          • Scalia

            But I never said it is wrong to listen to dissenting opinions. Those raising the white privilege issue are the ones foreclosing debate by telling whites to “check your privilege.” The whole approach is racist, and it should be condemned as such.

          • pennywit

            But I never said it is wrong to listen to dissenting opinions

            The problem with these long threads is that I lose track of who’s responding to what. I find the “check your privilege, this ends the debate” approach to be close-minded and prejudiced. Not to mention pretty stupid.

            My own observation is that modern far-left types have a lot of rules that “allies” — that is, the white, male, cisgendered folks who march with them — are supposed to follow, but very little interest in building a coalition that could actually change things.

          • To the extent you failed to push back on that you are part of the problem.

          • pennywit

            Actually … I roundly mocked her for the “check your privilege” thing and told her she wouldn’t shut me up, though I was open to a different POV. And then I mocked her some more. Not much more I could do through the Web, honestly.

          • Glad to see that you are not a part of the problem.

          • pennywit

            Well, pin a rose on my fucking nose.

          • Gladly.

      • Retired military

        But but these are the folks who voted just like you.

        • pennywit

          And I’m sure David Duke voted much like you did. That doesn’t mean that you’re anything like him.

          • Retired military

            Only thing is there are very very few David dukes but there are many more libs like this.

          • jim_m

            Only thing is that Pennywit thinks the same way as they do and he hates being shown what an idiot he has been.

      • jim_m

        Only because it is true

        • pennywit

          Jim, in the years I’ve read Wizbang, I’ve yet to see you contribute to this board in some way that doesn’t involve a stream of insults and a refusal to offer anything with even the most remote resemblance of substance.

          In fact, I think it’s fair to say that your contributions are the dark brown shit stain on the underwear of the Internet.

          So, please, let me express this sentiment from the bottom of my liberal bleeding heart.

          Go.

          Fuck.

          Yourself.

          That is all.

          • Do you really want to go there?

          • pennywit

            Rodney, you’re a moderator here, you tell me to back off, I back off.

          • I give you a choice instead.

            Retract and apologize.

            Suck it up when you get punched back twice as hard.

            Choose one, choose wisely.

          • pennywit

            I am perfectly willing to refrain. But I will not retract. I’ve watched Jim dole out insults for years, and very few people call him on it or dish it back to him. I am willing to let my comments stand.

          • So let it be written.
            So let it be done.

          • pennywit

            Is that from The Ten Commandments or Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade?

          • None of the above. Thanks for playing.

          • Scalia

            And he has chosen one of your options. By being willing to refrain, he has chosen to “[s]uck it up.” He does not have to apologize, and if he chooses to punch Jim back three times as hard, that’s his privilege as a poster here. That does not mean I agree with his beliefs.

          • jim_m

            Wow. The dog that barks loudest is the one that got hit.

            I said nothing that was vulgar or rude. I have merely pointed out in a rather matter-of-fact way that I think it reflects your feelings. If I were wrong a simple, “no it does not” would have sufficed. The fact that you are so over the top suggests that I am correct in my assumptions.

          • pennywit

            Oh no, not this time buddy. But you have been plenty vulgar over the years. I am sick of it, for one.

          • jim_m

            Over the years? You haven’t been posting for more than 6 months.

          • Scalia

            He has commented here for years under different aliases. I enjoy dialoging with him. He’s far more intelligent than Bruce and is rarely as insulting.

            He’s been a little thin-skinned with you, but that’s probably because his personality doesn’t mesh with yours.

            Really, at bottom, “white privilege” is simply repackaged racism. Liberals who yap about it exhibit the totalitarianism they have always embraced.

          • jim_m

            I’m surprised at his response here. I have generally been civil with him (at least under his current guise) and have had decent exchanges with him here.

            But I have to think that I struck a chord with him pointing out the racism and hate inherent in the concept of white privilege. Naturally, someone who has bought into that concept wouldn’t like it being pointed out that he is exactly what he condemns.

            And you are correct to point out that there is a totalitarian component to it. Liberals want to take livelihoods and prosperity away from people based solely on their skin color and while they admit that the white person has done nothing actively racist against anyone else, that whites should be punished for it regardless.

            There are few ideas as bigoted and repugnant as white privilege. Anyone supporting it outs themselves as a truly ugly person.

          • pennywit

            Let me put this study in to play: https://www.shrm.org/hr-today/news/hr-magazine/pages/0203hrnews2.aspx

            There is also a study that indicates that resumes from people who who are overtly religious or overtly atheist are more likely to face discrimination in hiring.

          • If one puts stuff like that out there, they have asked to be judged based on it.

            Choices and Actions have Consequences.

          • pennywit

            Well, yes and no. For the religion survey, they used resumed that cited college organizations related to religion or atheism.

            On race, the study found a person with an identical resume was less likely to get a call back if they had an ethnic name. You can’t exactly tell a person to leave his name off of his resume.

          • People can and do change their names. Parental malpractice in naming is nothing new, e.g. Reality Winning.

          • jim_m

            Overtly religious or overtly atheist.

            Same thing, different religion.

            People avoid hiring candidates who are seen as intolerant and likely to make waves. Nothing illegal about that.

          • jim_m

            Bertrand acknowledged that employers could not conclusively determine the race of a job applicant from a resume. However, she contended that the study clearly showed a bias among employers based on perceptions.

            I believe our study clearly shows that when employers or hiring managers see a name that might indicate race, or at least the applicants social class, they appear to react negatively towards it, Bertrand says.

            Emphasis mine.

            There is a tendency amongst the lower classes of blacks to give their kids funky names. It is my experience that Shaniqua and DeShone don’t get high paying jobs, but Kevin and Laurie (both executives at my company who are also minorities) do. Class, education and culture, not race, make the difference.

          • pennywit

            I guess we’re at impasse, aren’t we?

          • jim_m

            Or you could just fuck off, you bigot

          • pennywit

            Well, somebody’s a Mr. Grumpypants today!!

          • Scalia

            I don’t know how a manager can determine whether an applicant is an atheist other than that person making it a point to advertise h/erself as such. In that case, such a person should expect to occupy a lower place on the totem pole. Managers need harmony, not flag-waiving partisans.

            As to the study in “play,” it’s another example of confusing correlation with causation. A sham study “suggests” bias, so in order to side-step an indignant campaign against a company’s “racist” hiring policies, said company will be forced to hire a bunch of Keshawns and Latashas in order to stay in business.

            Sorry, but our patience is exhausted over stuff like this. Crying wolf over every alleged racist boogeyman in the bushes results in the crier being ignored.

            Can’t you see the totalitarian nature of these wolves in sheep’s clothing? You’re far more reasonable than the other liberals here, and I commend you for calling out the kooks on your side, but sometimes you have to reevaluate the underlying philosophy that produces tripe like this. Neo-liberalism is a threat to liberty and must be defeated before it enslaves all of us.

          • pennywit

            The religion study, by the way, made the rounds of Christian online media a few months back. Basically, the people conducting the studies submitted nearly identical resumes for entry-level positions.

            In one, the resume listed something like “National Club” as an extracurricular activity. In another, it might say something like “National Evangelical Christian Club.” And another would say “National Atheist Club.” “National Club” would get a callback. The other two would not.

          • Truth only hurts when it is supposed to.

  • Scalia

    And a shout-out to President Trump for reimposing the trans-ban.

    • That (DD) would require a guilty verdict at a trial by Court Martial. The Commander in Chief can, however, relieve him at will.

    • Retired military

      Easy for the CDR to say until the actual written policy is published. Then he can put his ass on the line via court martial (if that is what Trump wants) or his career (much more likely) and then his replacement will implement the policy.

      • WHO’S THE BUSTER

        I guess he simply wasn’t used to getting his directives via Twitter.

        • Retired military

          Not the best way to receive directives but then formal policy (with all its particulars) can hardly fit into 256 characters. Meanwhile the American people get the jist of the policy without the filtering of the MSM leftist media. I have an idea. Maybe Trump would tweet less if the MSM would be more honest in its reporting. One kinda feeds off the other.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            The “MSN” generally plays his own words in the form of film footage or documenting his tweeting and are then accused of being unfair.

            Reminds me of when Charles Barkley said he was misquoted in his autobiography.

            So what was one of Trump’s daily lies today? Hmmm…let’s pick one, oh yeah, they had to admit that there was no phone call from the Boy Scout leader praising that highly inappropriate speech.

          • Scalia

            RM types “MSM” and you type “MSN.”

            You think that because they get some things right, they’re getting everything right. Across the board, they’ve been making stuff up or distorting the facts in order to propel their Russian collusion narrative, etc., etc. with nary a word from you.

            Everybody here knows that the only information you care about is what confirms your biases, so why should we care what you say about the president’s tweets or speeches? Since your blood is partisan blue, quit complaining about another’s partisan red.

          • WHO’S THE BUSTER

            The MSN was merely a mistake. My browser opens to it and my fingers simply followed suit.

            I do have a suggestion, that I am sure Scaramucci would agree with, keep Stephen Miller locked up in a closet somewhere. He has been front and center twice and made a fool of himself both times. Sarah Huckabee Sanders is simply indignant, but Miller is like a gas can looking for a match.

            As far as the Russia story, I can wait until its conclusion, but Trump is the one that keeps it front and center.

            I wonder who will quit next. In my pool, I have Tillerson, followed by McMasters.

          • Scalia

            Miller was great on immigration and made the reporters look like fools. Perhaps your reporters are the ones who should be locked up in a closet.

          • Scalia

            BTW, it’s McMaster, not McMasters. And I wouldn’t shed any tears if McMaster were shown the door.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            “…Miller is like a gas can looking for a match.”
            Don’t need a match when you have a flaming asshole like Jim Acosta in the room.

          • Well said.

          • Walter_Cronanty

            Thank you.

  • WHO’S THE BUSTER

    I am going to miss Scaramucci for no other reason than entertainment value.

  • Paul Hooson

    I’m heartbroken. He was easily the most absurd figure ever associated with our government, where he must have inspired a hundred jokes by me. I laughed so hard during his short 11 days and he made me feel good and forget all my problems.

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Portland, progressive paradise:

    Sanctuary City Leaders Silent After Homeless Illegal Alien Rapes Woman in Pricey Portland Neighborhood
    …Thanks to a confluence of liberal, feel-good, politically correct, good-idea-on-paper-but-not-in-real-life public policies, an elderly Portland resident of this neighborhood is recovering from a brutal rape at the hands of a homeless illegal alien drug addict. The road to this woman’s hell was paved with Oregon’s aggressive sanctuary laws that make it illegal for any public employee to cooperate with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and city policies that attract homeless people from across the nation to live in tent cities all around Portland. Combine that with a deeply understaffed and undersupported police force, and the liberal utopia of Portlandia is revealed as something quite a bit less than paradise.
    ***
    …Martinez, whose criminal record in the United States stretches back to 2001, when, at the age of 15, he completed drug and alcohol treatment in Texas. He has since been deported over 20 times, only to return to the U.S. to commit more felonies. He’s been issued nine warrants for failure to appear, has routinely violated the terms of his parole, and regularly commits violent crimes. Martinez moved to Portland sometime in the past three years. His last listed address was a shelter in Northwest Portland, but he lives on the streets.

    His most recent deportation was in November 2016. In December, the Department of Homeland Security requested a detainer for Martinez, but local authorities released him back into the community without notifying DHS or ICE. An immigration detainer is a request to authorities to notify DHS before releasing Martinez to allow ICE to take him into custody. This never happened.

  • Brett Buck

    Saramucchi *immediately* showed himself to be a stereotypical East Coast guido type, loudmouth, etc, The kind of guy who goes to a bar in a 3-piece suit, orders a scotch, and then starts in with “hey, you looking at ME?”. When the first thing anyone hears you say is a completely idiotic and gratuitous string of expletives, that’s not a good sign.

    I like Kelly already (purported Comey call notwithstanding) and firing a lighting rod, “it’s all about me” loudmouth like Saramucchi is why.

  • pennywit

    Scaramucci!! Scaramucci!! Will you do the fandango? Nope. He’s fandangone.

    • Scalia

      Your link doesn’t work.

  • Retired military

    When the people making money off of global warming start acting like there is a problem then I might, just might start giving them a little more credence.

    http://dailycaller.com/2017/08/02/exclusive-al-gores-home-devours-34-times-more-electricity-than-average-u-s-household/

    • Walter_Cronanty

      I read that article earlier. What a hoot!

  • Walter_Cronanty

    Hmmm. Which is worse – Taking a meeting with “representatives” of a foreign government who stated that they had incriminating evidence against political opponents, or our own government unlawfully using our intelligence agencies against their political opponents [we’ll leave the IRS, OSHA, ATF, etc., out of this discussion]?

    … [T]he former Obama administration had “easy access” to sensitive classified information and that they may have used it to “achieve partisan political purposes, including the selective, anonymous leaking of such information.”

    Congressional investigators uncovered that “one official [whose] position has no apparent intelligence-related function”—now believed to be [Samantha] Power—”made hundreds of unmasking requests during the final year of the Obama administration.”

    Little justification was provided for the request of this sensitive classified information, which government insiders described as outside the purview of a U.N. ambassador.

    ***
    One former senior U.S. official intimately familiar with the national security infrastructure told the Free Beacon that Power would have little reason to be requesting such information, particularly information that included in raw intelligence reports related to Trump and his team.

    “Asking for an unmasking is rare at the [National Security Council] or the State Department. It is frankly shocking that anyone would be asking for dozens, and if there are really hundreds it is indefensible,” said the former official. “It does make me wonder why [National Security Agency] didn’t stop her [Power], by questioning this practice and getting the head of NSA to raise it with the president or the national security adviser.”

    • Retired military

      “Taking a meeting with “representatives” of a foreign government who stated that they had incriminating evidence against political opponents”
      Ask Hillary Clinton and mention Ukraine.

      ” or our own government unlawfully using our intelligence agencies against their political opponents”

      Ask Obama Rice Clinton etc etc.

  • pennywit

    Have you guys read about the indie pro wrestler Progressive Liberal? It looks like an effective heel concept for the indie circult. Despite his interviews, I can’t decide if the performer behind the wrestler is actually liberal himself (though not as “liberal” as his character) or if he’s dedicated to kayfabe.

  • Here’s some “best of” moments: