« D-Day For Terri Schiavo | Main | An open letter to Democrats »

Son Of Saudi Embassy Employee Indicted In Assassination Plot (Updated)

The Associated Press is reporting that that a U.S. citizen (and a former high school valedictorian) from the Washington D.C. suburb of Falls Church, Virginia who was studying in Saudi Arabia has been charged in a plot to assassinate the President.

ALEXANDRIA, Va. (AP) - A former Virginia high school valedictorian who had been detained in Saudi Arabia as a suspected terrorist was charged Tuesday with conspiring to assassinate President Bush and with supporting the al-Qaida terrorist network.

Ahmed Omar Abu Ali, 23, a U.S. citizen, made an initial appearance Tuesday in U.S. District Court but did not enter a plea. He contended that he was tortured while detained in Saudi Arabia since June of 2003 and offered through his lawyer to show the judge his scars.

The federal indictment said that in 2002 and 2003 Abu Ali and an unidentified co-conspirator discussed plans for Abu Ali to assassinate Bush. They discussed two scenarios, the indictment said, one in which Abu Ali "would get close enough to the president to shoot him on the street" and, alternatively, "an operation in which Abu Ali would detonate a car bomb."

Ahmed Omar Abu Ali was related to the "paintball jihad" group of 11 Virginia men charged in 2003. One point of crossroads between Ali and the paintball jihadists is the Dar Al Arqam Islamic center in Falls Church. From the Detroit News report on the paintball jihadists:
Dar Al Arqam is a little-known Islamic center in Falls Church, with none of the grandeur of an important religious center. It is tucked into a beige three-story office building on South Washington Street next to a carpet dealer, an Asian import gallery and a Latino grocery.

It would be easy to miss -- except on nights when crowds gather to hear popular speakers.

In recent years, Royer and his friends met periodically at the center, which promotes an orthodox version of Islam known as salafi, the Arabic word for "predecessors." The draw: a young, articulate preacher, who eventually became a spiritual leader to the men.

Ali al-Timimi is an unusual figure in Washington's Muslim community. He is the U.S.-born son of Iraqi immigrants and does cutting-edge scientific research as a doctoral candidate at George Mason University. But to Muslim followers, Timimi, 39, is known more for his speeches.

It's also possible that his father held (or holds) a high level position in the Saudi Embassy

Previously Ali was best known for having been held in Saudi Arabia since June 2003 without charges. Today's announcement goes a long way toward explaining the murky details surrounding his detention.

[Belated thanks to firstbrokenangel for the original tip]

Update: I had assumed that Ali was enrolled at George Mason High School in Falls Church, VA (the only high school in the city), but Rusty Shakelford found this quote from the New York Times:

The Washington Post reported in 2003 that Mr. Ali was valedictorian of his 1999 high school class at the Islamic Saudi Academy in Alexandria, where school officials described him as "an exceptional student," with special talent in mathematics and science.
The Islamic Saudi Academy is a bilingual English-Arabic school with a dual American and Middle Eastern curriculum. ISA prepares students for entry into American, as well as international universities and colleges.

Their admission policy page gives credence to the story that Ali is the son of a Saudi diplomat. Admission priorities is given to children of Saudi Arabian nationals living in the United States, and children of Saudi Arabian diplomats or others persons on Saudi governmental assignment are guaranteed admission.

Update 2: Reading this report (via Rusty) gives me a second source on the Saudi Embassy link. Ali's father is a system analyst in the Royal Saudi Embassy in Washington, D.C. The headline has been updated.

The Jawa Report has a roundup of other sites covering the story.

Update 3: Charles Johnson reports that supporters of Ahmed Omar Abu Ali crowded into an Alexandria, VA courtroom laughed when the charges were read.

Update 4: The Jawa Report looks at the Saudi government funded Islamic Saudi Academy school and reports the following:

According to the Washington Post and reprinted in the NY Times, he attended the Islamic Saudi Academy in Alexandria Virginia. While family and friends feign that he is the victim of anti-Muslim discrimination, the Jawa Report can reveal that the school in question follows the radical Wahhabi curriculum of the Saudi Ministry of Education. Until recent protest by the US government, this curriculum has included anti-Semetic and anti-Christian bigotry and overt calls to jihad. Thus Ahmed Omar Abu Ali is likely to be an ideologue who actually believed what he was taught at school.
Kind of blows that whole theory that he converted to radical Islam while in Saudi Arabia... It sure looks like he learned it here on U.S. soil.


TrackBack

Listed below are links to weblogs that reference Son Of Saudi Embassy Employee Indicted In Assassination Plot (Updated):

» The Baron linked with Ahmed Omar Abu Ali Doesn't Surprise Me

» Josh's Weblog linked with Ahmed Omar Abu Ali

» Truth. Quante-fied. linked with Man Charged in Bush Assassination Plot

» The Political Teen linked with Man Charged in Alleged Plot to Kill Bush

» La Shawn Barber's Corner linked with Local Idiot Accused of Plotting To Kill President

» TPT: News Feeds linked with February 22, 2005 Links

» TPT: News Feeds linked with February 22, 2005 Links

» The Moderate Voice linked with Saudi Tie Pops Up Again In Plot To Kill President Bush

Comments (39)

Is it just me or does every... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

Is it just me or does everyone else notice that these fanatics that want to inflict Islamofascism on the whole world and particularly on the U.S. have complaints when they are subjected to milder forms of it in the countries that practice it already? This little terroristic turd has been fighting for nearly two years to get back to a country he claims oppresses Muslims so he can get a fair trial and not face any more torture. Kinda shoots that "American's torturing Muslims in Iraq and Guantanamo" story full of holes. I think right after he's convicted he should be sentenced by Sharia law guidlines, how could we do less than make his dream of a true Muslim society come true?

He's a U.S. citizen, bullwi... (Below threshold)
mantis:

He's a U.S. citizen, bullwinkle, and thus has the right to a fair trial inside the U.S., not in Iraq or Guantanamo. So I guess his desire to come back here doesn't shoot holes in anything.

It shoots holes in the clai... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

It shoots holes in the claims that we practice torture. He could just as easily have been sent to Guatanamo or left in Saudi Arabia. My point, that you failed to get, is that he wants the protection of a democracy but would prefer to see us suffering at the hands of Islamofascists. He has no worries about mistreatment here, but has plenty to fear under Sharia law. When it's all said and done, he'l;l be screaming about American oppression of Muslims again, assuring us all that the world would be better off living in a paradise ruled by the very law he has worked so hard to escape.

Your claim lies on the assu... (Below threshold)
mantis:

Your claim lies on the assumption that treatment of prisoners in Iraq or Guantanamo is equivalent of treatment of citizens within the U.S. It is not. Other than that you seem to want to deprive him of rights afforded any other citizen based purely on his beliefs. Now I don't know what he would prefer, whether it's "us suffering at the hands of Islamofascists" or being attacked by bees, and I don't care. Hypocrisy is not a reason to deny someone their rights. I'm sure being a prisoner in Saudi Arabia is worse than in Iraq or Gitmo, which are worse than here in the U.S. As far as I know no one has claimed that we practice torture here in the U.S., and so his desire to come back here shoots holes in no claims.

You still missed the point,... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

You still missed the point, so once again, slowly: He has no fear of torure in our hands, anywhere. That is proven by his desire to return to U.S. custody. WE HAD THE OPTION TO SEND HIM ANY PLACE WE WANTED TO, INCLUDING GITMO, OR TO LEAVE HIM WHERE HE WAS. He thought he would be safer in our custody. Get it yet? There are U.S. citizens in Gitmo right now. He knows just like every other terrorist out there that the claims are bullshit, the only ones that haven't figured that out are left-leaning Americans and Europeans. There is no "right" to have the government work to have a U.S. citizen extradited from a country where he has committed a crime, we don't even have an extradition treaty with Saudi Arabia. He based his decision to do everything in his power to return here or anywhere we sent him and face our laws rather than face the law he wants imposed on us.

mantis,Legally, yo... (Below threshold)
AnonymousDrivel:

mantis,

Legally, you are right and bullwinkle is not challenging that point. What he is advancing is the poetic injustice of it all if there is such a thing.

I'm in the bullwinkle camp philosophically though, legally, I couldn't justify the Sharia Law implementation. Now the GITMO Treatment may have some legal standing because of the terrorist ties, but I doubt very seriously that anyone in authority will advocate such a venue. Ali will receive his perhaps unjustifiably deserved kid-gloves treatment with concomitant penance, or not. But you cannot deny the hypocrisy of Ali's request.

It's official: Straight-A s... (Below threshold)
Christopher Rake:

It's official: Straight-A students are a menace to society.

Saudi Arabia is a police st... (Below threshold)
moghedien:

Saudi Arabia is a police state; police states tend to hold people without charges, torture them, and sentence them without offering adequate legal representation. Maybe Ali should have read the Michelin travel guide a little more closely...

Perhaps he had dual citizen... (Below threshold)
Fran Busby:

Perhaps he had dual citizenship?

mantis writes: As... (Below threshold)
s9:

mantis writes: As far as I know, no one has claimed that we practice torture here in the U.S. [...]

Um, so now you know. Here's the concluding sentence (which appears after a litany of reports of horrific abuse):

[...] This restriction on the ability of inmates to vindicate their rights in court was one of many ways in which U.S. laws and judicial mechanisms failed to meet the standards mandated by the Convention against Torture.

Read the article I linked. Then read the Convention Against Torture. It's pretty damned hard to escape the conclusion that the Americans aren't even trying to prevent torture in their prisons. Certainly, the position advanced by Human Rights Watch is that the U.S.A. is practicing torture by failing to prevent it.

It's official: Straight-... (Below threshold)
julie:

It's official: Straight-A students are a menace to society.

Honor Society? Or, terrorist cell?

s9,That was pretty... (Below threshold)
mesablue:

s9,

That was pretty weak, no genocide or chopping off of hands or heads.

I'd take my chances in our prison system over that of any in the world.

Oops, forgot about the Red Cross 72 hour incarceration rule for blood donors.

mesablue writes: ... (Below threshold)
s9:

mesablue writes: s9, That was pretty weak, no genocide or chopping off of hands or heads.

Props to you for setting the bar so high! "America: at least we don't chop off your head or your hands, nor are we actually trying to eliminate your entire ethnicity from the face of the Earth."

Mr. Ali was valedictoria... (Below threshold)
julie:

Mr. Ali was valedictorian of his 1999 high school class at the Islamic Saudi Academy in Alexandria

Rusty, what were ISA's 1999 football stats? [Let's just see how good Rusty really is. ;)]

s9: "America: at least w... (Below threshold)
Patrick Chester:

s9: "America: at least we don't chop off your head or your hands, nor are we actually trying to eliminate your entire ethnicity from the face of the Earth."

More like:

America: An easy target since we know they won't hunt us down and kill us like other nation's governments would if we dissed them. But we can still look oh-so-concerned for human rights by doing it, so let's take the path of least resistance.

Bullwinkle, I get your poin... (Below threshold)
mantis:

Bullwinkle, I get your point, I just contend that it is baseless, and your stating of it is contradictory. You say both that "we had the option to send him" and "he had the choice". Which is it? As I now understand it, Abu-Ali's return to the U.S. is the result of our gov't demanding the Saudi's charge him, or send him here. So in fact this does not seem to be his choice at all. If in fact he wishes to impose Islamic law upon the world, or the U.S., or whatever, I certainly think it would be hypocritical for him to desire justice here. However, I have no idea what he believes, and it is not his choice as to where he is prosecuted, so even the hypocrisy angle is crap at this point. And as far as your contention that there are U.S. citizens imprisoned at Gitmo, who? Hamdi? Nope, sent him back when they discovered he was American. Padilla? Nope, never went there. If we do have U.S. citizens down there, especially without charging them with a crime (like Padilla), then it is a serious breach of their rights. Just because you call a citizen a terra-ist, doesn't mean they are no longer a citizen.

Patrick Chester writ... (Below threshold)
s9:

Patrick Chester writes: More like: "America: An easy target since we know they won't hunt us down and kill us like other nation's governments would if we dissed them. But we can still look oh-so-concerned for human rights by doing it, so let's take the path of least resistance."

What the fsck does that have to do with whether Human Rights Watch is right to point out that the America is failing to prevent torture in its prison system?

Here's a report of an assas... (Below threshold)
BR:

Here's a report of an assassinaton plot on our president, and all the leftwing trolls do is attack America in this thread.

BR writes: Here's... (Below threshold)
s9:

BR writes: Here's a report of an assassinaton plot on our president, and all the leftwing trolls do is attack America in this thread.

Okay. I give up. I should think there might be even as much as a miniscule particle of credibility in this report for what reason again?

How come you don't hat tip?... (Below threshold)
fgirstbrokenangel:

How come you don't hat tip? I sent this info to both you and Rusty but it would be nice to be recognized.

Cindy

Bullwinkle and others, if y... (Below threshold)
fgirstbrokenangel:

Bullwinkle and others, if you go to dhimmi watch or jigad watch written by the same guy who has studied Islam for 20 years, you'll find your answer....................what they want is for the word to be muslim and practice islam.

Cindy

Bullwinkle and others, if y... (Below threshold)
fgirstbrokenangel:

Bullwinkle and others, if you go to dhimmi watch or jigad watch written by the same guy who has studied Islam for 20 years, you'll find your answer....................what they want is for the word to be muslim and practice islam.

Cindy

He was sent back to the Uni... (Below threshold)
Katherine:

He was sent back to the United States because it was becoming clear that a federal judge was going to order him back, and because they came up with some new evidence that convinced the grand jury to issue an indictment. He was held in Saudi Arabia for over a year, apparently at the request of the United States, and American officials participated in his interrogation there. The original allegations of torture come from the prosecutor in the N. Virginia jihad case, who made two separate remarks about Ali no longer having any of his fingernails. Whether he was speaking literally I do not know.

He was a U.S. citizen. It is totally, totally unacceptable to me that the U.S. government condone the torture of U.S. citizens by foreign governments. He may be guilty, but when all this started not only had he not been convicted--the grand jury didn't think there was enough to indict him. If we decide this is acceptable it is a matter of time before it happens to an innocent citizen. (It has already happened to innocent non-citizens.)

I still want him tried and convicted if he's guilty, obviously. Based on the indictment it sounds like they have a pretty good case against him but it all depends on who's testifying.

Mantis, I have a word for y... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

Mantis, I have a word for you, it's DUH. He had the choice to press for being returned to the U.S., or not, which he did, we had the choice of letting him or not, and the choice of sending him to Gitmo or any other federal facility we wanted to. Had you bothered to read the article you might have caught this paragraph:
Abu Ali had been detained for nearly two years by the Saudi Arabian government. His family sued the U.S. government shortly after his arrest there, claiming the Saudis were essentially holding him at the U.S. government's request.
He and his family both knew that wherever the U.S. put him he was unlikely to face the torture than he was in a country that bases it's laws on his religion.

To all the trolls who attac... (Below threshold)
BR:

To all the trolls who attack America in this thread:

When I snap my fingers, you will come up to present time:

SNAP!

I just saw this terrorist's... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

I just saw this terrorist's lawyer on TV, he said that his client wanted to come back to the U.S. so he could get a fair trial. So he doesn't feel he can get a fair trial under the form of law they practice in Saudi Arabia, the law he and his fellow terrorists want to force on the whole world. Go figure....

Thanks Kevin.Cindy... (Below threshold)
fgirstbrokenangel:

Thanks Kevin.

Cindy
aka Firstbrokenangel

BR writes: SNAP!<... (Below threshold)
s9:

BR writes: SNAP!

Nice. But do you think you could address the question I put up for you?

Ok, Bullwinkle, so he wante... (Below threshold)
mantis:

Ok, Bullwinkle, so he wanted to come back here and get a fair trial. And I had bothered to read the article, I just didn't assume that his family's lawsuit was necessarily his desire, as I assume the Saudis did not allow him contact. Even so, I said it would be hypocritical if he did desire to come back and was a believer in the righteousness of Islamic law. So what, it's hypocritical. The point I made was this has nothing to do with Iraq or Guantanamo, where you say the Gov't could decide to send him, and therefore there is not torture going on in those places. In fact it would be illegal for our Gov't to send him to Gitmo, as I'm sure his lawyer knows. You conveniently ignore my only real argument, and you did not respond to my question. What U.S. citizens are being held at Gitmo?

Well BR, I don't see any tr... (Below threshold)
fgirstbrokenangel:

Well BR, I don't see any trolls around here and I sure didn't see any question either. I also didn't find anyone attacking America?

So who you talking to?

~Cindy

Just off the top of my head... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

Just off the top of my head there are at least two US citizens at Gitmo, Jose Padilla and Yaser Hamdi. I heard there's a newfangled thing on this here internet called Google that works miracles,so I gave it a try. Care to guess what I foung? Seems like the FBI suggested that Abu Ali might make a trip there himself.

http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=10000103&sid=aJ0ZtT8TdKzA&refer=us

Here's the juicy part of that article:

The lawyers for his family said FBI agents interrogated Abu Ali in the Saudi prison and threatened to have him declared an ``enemy combatant'' and transferred to the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where 550 suspected terrorists are being held.

A little research before opening your mouth goes a long, long way towards scoring points in a debate. Try it someday. You might find out the difference between assumptions and facts.

Well, a little reading woul... (Below threshold)
mantis:

Well, a little reading would go a long way for your argument, not to mention a little more google searching. Hamdi and Padilla are not at Gitmo, as I already stated (reading), and which you could find out yourself (google). Try again.

As for the article, his family said FBI threatened to send him there. Ok, even if that's true, it's illegal to do so. Now what were you saying about assumptions and facts?

Ok, Bullwinkle, I'll even d... (Below threshold)
mantis:

Ok, Bullwinkle, I'll even do the leg work for you.

Here's Padilla's case. Ooh, the juicy part:

"That same day (June 9, 2002), Padilla was taken into custody by Department of Defense officials and transported to the Consolidated Naval Brig in Charleston, South Carolina. He has been held there ever since."

And here's Hamdi's case.

"In April 2002, upon learning that Hamdi is an American citizen, authorities transferred him to a naval brig in Norfolk, Virginia, where he remained until a recent transfer to a brig in Charleston, South Carolina."

Maybe you ought to know what you are talking about before you go spouting off about facts and doing research.

It is not illegal to do so.... (Below threshold)
bullwinkle:

It is not illegal to do so. All that's required is to name him as an enemy combatant. BTW If he was under threat of going there but chose to ask to be returned to US custody it still shoots holes in the US torture theory. If they had transferred him he could have filed a writ of habeas corpus, and while that was being processed he'd be sitting in Gitmo waiting. These claims coming from the side that makes all kinds of claims about the evils our government is doing, like condoning and even encouraging torture seems to make those claims look more than a little suspicious too.

cindy you might want to fix... (Below threshold)

cindy you might want to fix your display name, its "fgirstbrokenangel".

I'm stll waiting to see dis... (Below threshold)
epador:

I'm stll waiting to see discussion about the assassination plot. All I saw in MSM was he supposedly chatted with others about potential ways to do it. I wouldn't be surprised if there are more than a few moonbat extremists who have/are doing the same thing. Should we have them all arrested in Saudi A when they go there for a "fact finding" mission... ???

Should we have them all ... (Below threshold)
julie:

Should we have them all arrested in Saudi A when they go there for a "fact finding" mission... ???

Yes.

Epador, there are probably ... (Below threshold)
BR:

Epador, there are probably more pertinent laws, but here's one I know of - The Smith Act of 1940. Excerpt from Ann Coulter's book, "Treason", pg. 58-59:

"...the Smith Act was passed in 1940 - six years before McCarthy was even elected to the Senate. The act, which criminalized 'teaching and advocating the violent overthrow of the government,' was written by a Democratic House and a Democratic Senate; signed into law by a Democrat president, FDR; and enforced by another Democrat president, Harry Truman."

I would say advocating a presidential assassination falls under that part of the Smith Act. There are probably specific laws about threatening such as well.

It is not illegal to do ... (Below threshold)
mantis:

It is not illegal to do so. All that's required is to name him as an enemy combatant.

I'm sure this thread is totally dead by now, but this just happened and is quite relevant. Here's the judge from the Padilla ruling:

"The court finds that the president has no power, neither express nor implied, neither constitutional nor statutory, to hold petitioner as an enemy combatant," Floyd wrote in a 23-page opinion that was a stern rebuke to the government. He gave the administration 45 days to take action."

That's why it's illegal bullwinkle.




Advertisements









rightads.gif

beltwaybloggers.gif

insiderslogo.jpg

mba_blue.gif

Follow Wizbang

Follow Wizbang on FacebookFollow Wizbang on TwitterSubscribe to Wizbang feedWizbang Mobile

Contact

Send e-mail tips to us:

[email protected]

Fresh Links

Credits

Section Editor: Maggie Whitton

Editors: Jay Tea, Lorie Byrd, Kim Priestap, DJ Drummond, Michael Laprarie, Baron Von Ottomatic, Shawn Mallow, Rick, Dan Karipides, Michael Avitablile, Charlie Quidnunc, Steve Schippert

Emeritus: Paul, Mary Katherine Ham, Jim Addison, Alexander K. McClure, Cassy Fiano, Bill Jempty, John Stansbury, Rob Port

In Memorium: HughS

All original content copyright © 2003-2010 by Wizbang®, LLC. All rights reserved. Wizbang® is a registered service mark.

Powered by Movable Type Pro 4.361

Hosting by ServInt

Ratings on this site are powered by the Ajax Ratings Pro plugin for Movable Type.

Search on this site is powered by the FastSearch plugin for Movable Type.

Blogrolls on this site are powered by the MT-Blogroll.

Temporary site design is based on Cutline and Cutline for MT. Graphics by Apothegm Designs.

Author Login



Terms Of Service

DCMA Compliance Notice

Privacy Policy