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Save Muhammad Al-Asadi

Updated

Michelle Malkin is blogging about Muhammad al-Asadi, a Yemen man who could be put to death for publishing thumbnail photos of the Muhammad Cartoons. From the BBC:

Yemeni lawyers have called for a newspaper editor to be sentenced to death for showing cartoons depicting the Prophet Muhammad, his paper says.


Muhammad al-Asadi was arrested after his publication, the Yemen Observer, showed the Danish cartoons in February.

He denies the charges of offending Islam, under which he is being tried.

Life is so fleeting and valueless in most Islamic countries. Anyone can be killed at anytime for anything. There are no objective laws, simply a mob mentality that rules.

And more hypocrisy abounds:

When we ran our article on the Danish cartoons, it was all about how the Prophet should be honored, with quotations from famous people about what an important figure he was, and a news story on Yemeni protests. We reprinted the cartoons but blacked them out. Unfortunately by an innocent mistake in the production process, a thumbnail of the cartoons appeared on the front page--only 1.5cm [0.6 of an inch] by 2cm [0.8 of an inch], you could hardly read it. But then one of the directors of [another Yemeni newspaper] approached the Yemen Observer owners to blackmail us--that unless we paid them they would raise a stink. We refused, and they collected signatures on a petition that they presented to the prosecutor. Theirs is a newspaper that lives by blackmail, everybody knows that. But the government responded by revoking our license to publish and putting me in jail. (Emphasis mine)

Publishing cartoons of Muhammad gets a Muslim newspaper publisher a possible death sentence. Blackmail by another Muslim newspaper and prosecutors say nothing.

Update: Gateway Pundit reports that the lead prosecutor in this case has close ties to Al Qaeda. I'm shocked.

Also at Gateway Pundit: Kite-flying, folk dancing, and Danish cheese eating can get you in big trouble...if you're in an Islamic country.


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Comments (6)

Mr Claude Alllen, Bush Advi... (Below threshold)
Mach TucK:

Mr Claude Alllen, Bush Advisor, Screws Target Literally
By Rachel Shteir
Updated Friday, March 10, 2006, at 5:44 PM ET

When Claude Allen, President Bush's longtime domestic-policy adviser,
resigned suddenly on Feb. 9, it baffled administration critics and
fans. The White House claimed that Allen was leaving to spend more
time with his family, while the Washington Times speculated that the
45-year-old aide, a noted social conservative, might have quit to
protest a new Pentagon policy about military chaplains. Allen himself
never publicly explained the reason for his departure.

News today may shed light on the mystery of Allen's resignation.
According to the Montgomery County Police Department, Allen was
arrested yesterday and charged in a felony theft and a felony theft
scheme. According to a department press release, Allen conducted
approximately 25 fraudulent "refunds" in Target and Hecht's stores in
Maryland. On Jan. 2, a Target employee apprehended Allen after
observing him receive a refund for merchandise he had not purchased.
Target then contacted the Montgomery County Police. According to a
source familiar with the case, Target and the police had been
observing Allen since October 2005.

Allen is charged with practicing a form of shoplifting called "refund
fraud."

According to the department, Allen sought refunds for more than $5,000
in the past year. Allen allegedly stole items as expensive as a Bose
theater system and a photo printer. Theft of more than $500 is a
felony in Maryland.

Rachel Shteir is working on a book about shoplifting in America.

Oh My MY What is this another MORAL Neo-Con?

Tsk Tsk
Heckuva Job Bush "Moral Majority"
what a fecking joke we voted for. I'm Ill.
Washington is useless greedy immoral pigs.
Screw Bush. I'm never gonna vote for a rePIGlican
ever again.

"Life is so fleeting and va... (Below threshold)
Starboard Attitude:

"Life is so fleeting and valueless in Islam. Anyone can be killed at anytime for anything. There are no objective laws, simply a mob mentality that rules."

I'm no apologist for Islam--far from it. But the statement above is ludicrous. While I vehemently disagree with most of Shari'a law, it does exist and it is usually cited as an objective basis for the atrocities that leave us westerners appalled.

That said, I am sickened to see the ignorance exemplified by those three sentences--particularly when they come from my side of the fence. They're truly asinine.

Funny, as I typed my last c... (Below threshold)
Starboard Attitude:

Funny, as I typed my last comment, the first sentence was changed from, " in Islam" to "in most Islamic countries." That doesn't fix things, however.

KP, what is it about your p... (Below threshold)
epador:

KP, what is it about your posts that attract such vehement trolling and Freudian errors?

epador, What kind of commen... (Below threshold)
bryanD:

epador, What kind of comments should one expect from such anecdotal and vaguely self-congratulatory factoids? And Michelle Malkin: she has done some good stuff but when she dons her nun's habit you can expect some hapless soul to be exploited in multiple posts. Low level propaganda.

Well, now, most bloggin' is... (Below threshold)
epador:

Well, now, most bloggin' is indeed anecdotal, and I fail to see the self-congratulatory nature of this post. I guess linking to MM first then the BBC might fall under self-serving. I didn't see any evidence of rapture or self-flagellation either, just dismay with perhaps a bit too broad generalization inferred from the anecdotes.

The point I was trying to make is that the EMOTION of the piece indeed attracted emotional, rather than even semi-rational response from Tuck, and a fun error from SA (who was trying to make a valid point - though my experience in the Middle East makes me lean more towards KP's assessment than SA's: there are laws, but they are interpreted more often from a mob mentality than a rational what's good for the goose is good for the gander).

Now your reply on the other hand...




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