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USA Today's NSA Poll

The folks at USA Today must have been a little dismayed when the first poll done after its NSA Phone Call Program article showed that a vast majority of Americans supported the NSA's efforts. Interestingly, today the Gallup/USA Today poll came out, and it claims that 51% of the Americans polled don't support the NSA program.

Dan Riehl doesn't believe it, and neither do I. Dan was called for this poll, so he has interesting insight into the guts of the poll questions:

WASHINGTON -- The majority of Americans disapprove of a massive Pentagon database containing the records of billions of phone calls made by ordinary citizens, according to a USA TODAY/Gallup Poll. About two-thirds are concerned that the program may signal other, not-yet-disclosed intelligence efforts directed at the general public.


By 51%-43%, those polled disapprove of the program, disclosed Thursday in USA TODAY. The National Security Agency has been collecting phone records from three of the nation's four largest telecommunication companies since soon after the Sept. 11 attacks. This pole has some serious problems in my view.

Read the rest of the post. It's very educational.


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Comments (15)

"Dan Riehl doesn't believe ... (Below threshold)
jp2:

"Dan Riehl doesn't believe it, and neither do I."

lol

Hilarious today! I bet you believed they had WMD too...

As long as they're not trac... (Below threshold)

As long as they're not tracking calls from the Dominican Republic, I could care less.

The base assumption of the ... (Below threshold)
cubanbob:

The base assumption of the question invalidates the poll. Like I said before the MSM polls are bullshit.

The entire democrat part... (Below threshold)
Rob in LA Ca.:

The entire democrat party is full of bullshit. What a joke it what to see the fake shock of reading leaked stories in the newspaper by none other than Senator "LEAKY" Leahy. What hypocrites and frauds. Are they even capable of feeling embarrassment?

I guess being complete losers numbs them completely.

jp2, I do not know about WM... (Below threshold)
Zelsdorf:

jp2, I do not know about WMD, but I do wonder what Saddam was doing with several mobile labs, commonly thought (?) to produce hydrogen for weather ballons. It is particularly questionable why it would be necessary with the enemy, us, on your border waiting to invade. Also, the fact Iraqi soldiers had new chem/bio suits with them along with atropine surretts seems to be a bit far to carry a ruse.

Good factual points Zelsdor... (Below threshold)
virgo:

Good factual points Zelsdorf!but your logic is wasted on the likes of jp2. more bogus polls begets more bogus results..

There's a difference betwee... (Below threshold)
jpm100:

There's a difference between monitoring suspected terrorist with methods (even without warrants) that leave a papertrail and monitoring the general public with methods that can conceivably leave no papartrail.

I've been supportive of the war on terror including the wiretapping. But there's no reason to start scooping up data on the general public.

Although the motive and use of this program is currently done with the best intentions, will that be the way it is used 25 years from now?

There has to be limits somewhere. If you think this 'collect data on everyone' is fine, tell me where the limits are? Physical searches of your home or person at whim?

Let's just look at who, off... (Below threshold)

Let's just look at who, off the top of my head, has information on what you're doing.

Your bank, if you use a debit or credit card.
Any credit card companies you might be in thrall to.
Your insurance agency, if you own a house or car.
Your cell phone provider.
Your telephone provider.
Credit reporting agencies.
The IRS.
Your cable provider.
Netflix.
Your local DVD rental outlet.
Amazon.
Your grocery store.
The Social Security Administration.

I'm sure there's more - those are just off the top of my head.

It strikes me that it doesn't make much sense to complain on the one hand about the government not connecting the dots pre 9/11 and then complaining about the government trying to connect the dots now to avoid another 9/11. Either they're allowed to collect reasonable data (and I don't see phone numbers as unreasonable, though your mileage may vary) or they're not. If they aren't, and another 9/11-type attack hits, then where does the blame lie for them missing vital information?

If they aren't, and anot... (Below threshold)
Lee:

If they aren't, and another 9/11-type attack hits, then where does the blame lie for them missing vital information?

It'll be interesting, as the lawsuits unfold, to see if ANY useful information has been gleened from this program in the approximately 5 years it has been in operation.

My guess: no.

JL,And let us not ... (Below threshold)
mesablue:

JL,

And let us not forget the census long form. Libs had no problem filling out dozens of pages asking for very detailed information. Then sending in the completed form to -gasp- the government.

Lee:"It'll be intere... (Below threshold)
Les Nessman:

Lee:
"It'll be interesting, as the lawsuits unfold, to see if ANY useful information has been gleened from this program in the approximately 5 years it has been in operation.

My guess: no."


Oh, goody. Let's reveal to the world any useful information we've gleaned from this operation. All in the name of pacifying the partisans/moonbats with their lawsuits. Who won't be pacified no matter how it turns out.

How 'bout we keep this stuff secret, m'kay?

There's plenty to legitimately criticize Bush for, so don't play politics with national security. I know it's tempting to go after your political opponent with ANYTHING you think will smear him but the pettiness and childishness shows through. The Dems follow this path at their own peril...


Libs had no problem fill... (Below threshold)
Lee:

Libs had no problem filling out dozens of pages asking for very detailed information.

Choosing, knowingly, to provide this information is one thing.

Having your government spy on you is another.

Zelsdorf - what does hydrog... (Below threshold)
jon:

Zelsdorf - what does hydrogen have to do with WMDs? There were no mobile labs or WMDs found.
As for the hazmat suits & atropine, that proves nothing.
You can assume as you will, but when friends of mine have been killed in Iraq, I want to see real proof... and so far, it seems to me, the Administration has played everything to scare us.
So far, other than Moussaoui, nobody's been brought to trial. And he was in jail on 9-11. Nothing has panned out, yet they keep digging deeper into our privacy, while Bin Laden & his ilk walk free.
I voted for Bush, but I'm through with all the bs.
He's not a conservative in anything he's done... he just talks. And I'm tired of them trying to manipulate me with feartalk.

As for the wiretaps, data-mining etc... just remember even if you think you have nothing to worry about... if you spoke to A, and A spoke to B, and B spoke to C, and C spoke with Mohammed Atta's cousin Khalid, you would then become a person of interest. Not because you did anything, other than speaking to someone 3 times removed from Khalid.

This and all the corruption... it all smells.
Very sad, because there seems nobody anymore in government, that cares about our country, or the constitution anymore.

Lee:"Choosing, kno... (Below threshold)

Lee:

"Choosing, knowingly, to provide this information is one thing."

Census forms are VOLUNTARY? You can choose not to answer? I think not, sir!

----------------

http://www.census.gov/acs/www/SBasics/What/What1.htm

Since this is done only once every 10 years, long-form information becomes out of date. Planners and other data users are reluctant to rely on it for decisions that are expensive and affect the quality of life of thousands of people. The American Community Survey is a way to provide the data communities need every year instead of once in ten years.

The American Community Survey is conducted under the authority of Title 13, United States Code, Sections 141 and 193, and response is mandatory. According to Section 221, persons who do not respond shall be fined not more than $100. Title 18 U.S.C. Section 3571 and Section 3559, in effect amends Title 13 U.S.C. Section 221 by changing the fine for anyone over 18 years old who refuses or willfully neglects to complete the questionnaire or answer questions posed by census takers from a fine of not more than $100 to not more than $5,000. The U.S. Census Bureau may use this information only for statistical purposes. We can assure you that your confidentiality is protected. Title 13 requires the Census Bureau to keep all information about you and all other respondents strictly confidential. Any Census Bureau employee who violates these provisions is subject to a fine of up to $250,000 or a prison sentence of up to five years, or both.

--------------

J.


Oh, goody. Let's reveal ... (Below threshold)
Lee:

Oh, goody. Let's reveal to the world any useful information we've gleaned from this operation. All in the name of pacifying the partisans/moonbats with their lawsuits. Who won't be pacified no matter how it turns out.

I didn't say reveal any information -- I said determine if useful information was obtained. I wrote:

It'll be interesting, as the lawsuits unfold, to see if ANY useful information has been gleened from this program in the approximately 5 years it has been in operation.

I'm happy to have that determination made by a judge, without leaking the information outside of the judge's chambers.

Look in the mirror, Les, - there is a moonbat staring right back at you.




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