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A glimpse of healthcare under President Barack Obama.

One of the truly frightening things about this upcoming election is that if the worst happens, then Democrats will have complete control over Washington -- and our lives. We'll be thrown headfirst into a complete nanny state whether we like it or not, with high taxes, skyrocketing gas prices, and banned handguns, just to name a few. We'll creep towards socialism a little at a time, and healthcare will be one of the first things to go. And it won't matter how angry the American people are. Democrats will want to infuse government into our lives in any way possible.

So what do we have to look forward to? Stuff like this:

A pregnant woman was forced to give birth in a hospital corridor after being turned away from two other hospitals when she went into labour.

Humiliated new mother Emma Johnson gave birth in a hallway at the Princess Royal Hospital in Haywards Heath, West Sussex.

She plans to make an official complaint to NHS bosses after staff at two hospitals refused to admit her because there were no beds available.

Miss Johnson and boyfriend Edward Prior, 23, called at their local hospital - the Royal Sussex in Brighton - after she went into labour at 1.15am on Tuesday, but the couple were told there were no beds.

Staff there also advised them that there were no free beds at Worthing Hospital, meaning Miss Johnson had to endure an unconventional and uncomfortable birth on the floor of a corridor at the Princess Royal - 20 miles away from the couple's Brighton home.

Miss Johnson said today : 'I feel really cross about it.

'We could have gone to the Royal Sussex Hospital in Brighton in about 10 minutes and then we wouldn't have had all this.

'The staff were nice once we arrived but this shouldn't have happened in the first place.

'It was extra stress for me at an already difficult time.'

Mr Prior, who works at an Asda supermarket, added: 'The midwives all rushed to help but there was no time to do anything before the baby arrived.

'We only just got there in the nick of time. A few minutes more and it would have been in the car park.

'It took 40 minutes to get there from Brighton and at one point I thought she was going to have the baby in the car.'

A spokesman for Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Trust said: 'We do everything we can to ensure women are able to give birth in a hospital of their choice.

'We are sorry that this was clearly not Miss Johnson's experience.

'Occasionally if a site is very busy we have to ask mums to travel but we do this as infrequently as possible because we know it is not what mums want.'


The kicker is that, with socialized healthcare, it doesn't matter what you want. What matters is how the government wants it, and that's how it will be. With no free market, there's no incentive for the government to fix the system, either. You just have to suffer.

Sadly, Britons and Canadians have no one but themselves to blame for their horrific healthcare, and if we vote people into office that implement socialized healthcare here as well like they did, then neither will we. We decide who makes the laws in this country.

Democrats like to crow about "free healthcare!" because they know that a lot of Americans will take nothing more than a superficial look at where they stand on the issues, and "free healthcare!" sounds good. A lot of Americans have no idea what they're getting into, and are completely ignorant of the fact that socialized medicine does not work, has never worked, and will only mean taxes will skyrocket and quality of healthcare will plummet. Democrats won't be honest and upfront about that part, because they know that if they were, no one would vote for them. So instead, they run on shallow platforms of "HOPE!" and "CHANGE!", and pray that no one digs any deeper.

John McCain is not the perfect candidate. But he gives us a better chance of saving this country from socialist moonbattery than Barack Obama, who will happily inflict his Marxist ideals onto us. Socialized healthcare is just one facet, and that is scary enough in and of itself.

Hat Tip: Moonbattery


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Comments (28)

If some people have to die,... (Below threshold)
JSchuler:

If some people have to die, then that's a reasonable price to pay for making sure that no one must ever face the horror of seeing their neighbor get better treatment.

Sit down, relax, and don't ... (Below threshold)
Rance:

Sit down, relax, and don't forget to breathe.

This is Washington you're talking about. The healthcare and bib pharma lobbies will make sure that any changes to the system are minimal.

The problem in my country i... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

The problem in my country is that there is a lack of funds in the health care sector, and we have our Conservative Prime Minister to blame for it.

It costs less to treat people in Canada. Wait times will be reduced significantly once our asshole government tells the asshole professional associations that a cardiologist from India gets to be a cardiologist in Canada. And, as our corporate tax rates are already lower than yours, once we get rid of these Bush Lite retards in Ottawa, we will once again make public health care a spending priority, ahead of tax breaks for rich people. (They're unpopular, and we don't need 'em. Our corporate tax rates are already lower than yours.)

Even with our Conservative Party, privatizing the entire health care system was never an option. It's a shame that we've let our system go so drastically underfunded, but once we have some grown-ups running things, we will dig up the Romanow Report and address the financing shortfalls. Our country is awash with cash, as the recession south of our border is affecting consumer confidence a lot more than our actual economy.

I think, Cassy, that you might actually believe your own Canada-as-East-Germany caricature, which is pretty funny as you probably have never been here and likely get all of your information on my country from whichever talk radio hack is using it as their ideological punching bag. Of course you're able to produce depressing examples of the Canadian system's flaws, but there are many more examples of an American liquidating his or her future in order to live healthily. Health is a right, an inviolable one, and as such, any expense that maintaining this right incurs ought to be distributed across the taxpaying population. A study that my company recently conducted for a large pharmaceutical company shows, at a 95% confidence level, based on a nationally representative sampling of 2,000 households, that Americans agree with this at a 3 to 2 ratio. Our client, surprisingly, was completely unsurprised by this, as these figures apparently line up with similar studies conducted in 1996 and 2002.

Based on all the sociographic data I pore over all day long, I am forced to conclude that American conservatives are the most vocal minority special interest group in the history of our planet. You will get your "socialized" health care, which, as a developed first world nation, you should have had a long time ago; and things will be fine. Go follow some Muslims around a shopping mall or something, Cassy. You don't offer any insight on health care policy.

I just read an article comp... (Below threshold)
Codekeyguy Author Profile Page:

I just read an article comparing Canadian and American health care. It seems under Canadian Universal Health Care, about 15% of the population is still not covered, uninsured, or cannot get it due to logistics. Under American Free Market healthcare, about 15% of the population are not covered etc.
The only difference is that the 85% of Canadians that are covered get sucky care. I look forward to the Messiah's take on this.


To Hyperbolist: ... (Below threshold)
Codekeyguy Author Profile Page:

To Hyperbolist:
The problem with government run universal health care is that the GOVERNMENT decides the level and quality of care one receives. Government is notorious for "lowest bidder" syndrome. Cheap is better. Also, anything the government touches ends up costing more, and providing less. Also, under US law, NO ONE can be turned away for a lack of funds at a health care facility. I could go on, but this should whet your taste buds.

Codekeyguy--please explain ... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Codekeyguy--please explain why health care costs far more per recipient in the U.S. than it does in Canada.

I acknowledge that we have awful wait times and a lack of specialists, but once we have sufficient funding, as explained in the Romanow Report, we will once again have a system to be proud of as we did for so many years. And it will be a government-managed system.

hyper, you make one mistake... (Below threshold)

hyper, you make one mistake about the American system, and it's hugely significant.

In America, everyone is entitled to health care.

NO ONE is entitled to "free" health care (where "free" means "everyone pays for it").

You need it? You get it. But afterward, you get to figure out how it gets handled. Do you fork it over? Well, you used it, and nobody should be required to work for free, so you are on the hook first. They might "eat" the costs as a charity case (and they do, many times). They might try to get the government to pick up the tab. They might get a charity to kick in.

One thing that is guaranteed, though: if the government gets involved, the costs will go through the roof, the actual compensation paid to providers will tank, quality will plummet, and either the country will go broke or we'll end up rationing care.

That means that bureaucrats will start deciding who gets what treatment or not, and when.

SCREW THAT.

J.

I acknowledge that... (Below threshold)
I acknowledge that we have awful wait times and a lack of specialists, but once we have sufficient funding, as explained in the Romanow Report, we will once again have a system to be proud of as we did for so many years.

And with that, you sum up the liberal mindset perfectly. Throw more money at it! Make another department for it! Increase government control!

Yet somehow, even when that happens, you libs are mystified when the system still fails.

Codekeyguy--please explain ... (Below threshold)
Dennis P. SKea:

Codekeyguy--please explain why health care costs far more per recipient in the U.S. than it does in Canada.
Hyperbolist:
You get what you pay for. In the US, there are choices: free clinics, HMO's, private insurance, Medicare/Medicaid, and cash only if you choose. Under universal health care, you get a single provider (the government) providing "equal treatment for everyone". This does not necessarily mean the CORRECT treatment for each individual, just the SAME (good, bad, or indifferent)socialist-like treatment.
This system is to be managed by government bureaucrats, who at best are bean counters, and at worst incompetent. Remember, "cheaper is better", and decisions will be made for exconomic, and not proper medical, reasons.
As a (not quite on point) analogy, "publik skool" education in the US is FAR more expensive per student than parochical/private school education, but the extra expense DOES NOT provide a better education. Your claim that the Canadian system will be fixed "if and when we get sufficient funding" may fly if the additional funding is mandated to health care, but do you really trust a bureaucrat to keep promises? The funds will be available only until a "better" need for it is found.
I apologize for the ramble. This issue is way too complex to address in a few bullets, but I hope you see my point.

Let's talk about the wonder... (Below threshold)
Maggie:

Let's talk about the wonderful system of
socialized medicine. I've lost three immediate
family members to the screw ups and long wait
times of socialized medicine in England.
What is really grand about an anonymous group
making the decision as to whether you recieve
treatment or not, and what kind. Then comes the
encroachment when they take it upon themselves
to tell you whether you're going to continue to
live or they'll pay you to commit suicide.
The message from the above is as individuals
you're too stupid to make these kinds of decisions on your own.
But you are smart enough to continue to work, pay taxes to keep paying
this parasitic monster.

I guess the insurmountable ... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

I guess the insurmountable philosophical difference between me and most Canadians, and you and less than half of your countrymen, can be summarized as follows: we don't hold people responsible for getting sick.

I know poor people aren't turned away from hospitals if they don't have insurance and have life threatening illnesses or injuries. I think, though, that they should also have access to the same prescription medications as people with money. And I don't think anybody should have to pay directly for it.

Cost per patient is lower in Canada than in the United States, Jay Tea. Prescription drugs cost less. Toyota built two plants in Ontario because we pay for our health care with tax dollars--despite the fact that Alabama (I believe--some southern state, anyway) offered hundreds of millions more in tax incentives. It's good for businesses.

Health care is "socialized" in Japan, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and probably every other country with a higher standard of living than the United States. While I'm not so naive as to think that throwing money at a problem will fix it, there are concrete numbers available in the Romanow Report that explain exactly how much more money is needed and for what. No tax increases required. We'll pay for it with oil for now, like Norway does. At current tax rates, our budget surplus would cover it (though I'd rather see the money invested in sustainable energy R&D, personally, though I'm a healthy 26 year old so I'm prejudiced in this regard). So, granted, this might not work in the United States, but it worked here for a long time and I'm optimistic that it will improve.

It should be a campaign issue (assuming your media monsters allow actual policy to enter the discussion). I think you will be surprised by how many people in the United States like the idea of "socialized" health care, as it's undeniably a majority at this point.

If Canadian health care is ... (Below threshold)
codekeyguy:

If Canadian health care is so great, why do High risk pregnant women get sent to the US? The main reason is A LACK OF BEDS FOR HIGH RISK BABIES.
Granted, your scrip costs are lower, but CARE IS RATIONED. What happens to you when you have a high maintenance disease? Do they allocate all the necessary resources to you? This of course means that SOMEONE ELSE WILL HAVE TO DO WITH LESS ( or is there a bottomless money pit available?)
PS: Medicaid is "universal health care" for those in need!!! Medicare is "universal health care" for us old folks. Medicaid is FREE. Medicare requires me to pay a fair share of my medical care.
But, unlike the UK, if I choose to secure a treatment not sanctioned by the coverage, I STILL KEEP MY OTHER COVERAGE. A lady in jolly old england lost ALL healthcare because she elected to pay for a procedure not sanctioned by the "all-knowing, all-seeing, omnipotent " health care provider.
Sorry, but universal health care, like all other socialist schemes, is doomed to failure.

I lived in Australia for 4 ... (Below threshold)
COgirl:

I lived in Australia for 4 years in the early 90's. There was also socialized medicine. Most people carried private insurance as well because when you really needed hospitalization, you couldn't get in. So people got to pay twice for their insurance.

Universal health care will be no different.

I'm not saying it's perfect... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

I'm not saying it's perfect, codekeyguy, and I've been careful not to. England clearly has its problems, and as my mother has been a nurse in Canada for 40 years, and turned down job offers in Texas that would have paid her twice as much, I'm quite familiar with the problems we have here. But your system is clearly broken: it costs way, way too much, as there are way too many fingers in the pot. Insurance companies, trial lawyers, and for-profit hospitals combine to drive prices through the roof, and the consumer suffers. This is the one instance I can think of where government management actually drives costs down. Again: consider Sweden, Norway, Japan...

In Korea, which is not quite at our standard of living, I could go see any specialist without a referral on maybe one or two weeks' notice. As a foreigner, I was forced to pay for my medical care: about $3 for the visit, and $2 for as many prescriptions as the doctor felt like writing. Socialized medicine! The horror!

HBI guess the ... (Below threshold)

HB
I guess the insurmountable philosophical difference between me and most Canadians, and you and less than half of your countrymen, can be summarized as follows: we don't hold people responsible for getting sick.

That statement is preposterous. US citizens hold people, whomever they are, responsible for payment, not for the fact that they became sick. Evidence the sheer size of charity based healthcare in this country to gain an understanding of how Americans treat those in need of healthcare...There is no insurmountable philosophical difference here; there is however an insurmountable gap between the way Americans innovate and provide superior healthcare to anyone on this soil...including millions of illegal aliens that benefit from a level of healthcare not available anywhere on the planet except here.

I know poor people aren't turned away from hospitals if they don't have insurance and have life threatening illnesses or injuries. I think, though, that they should also have access to the same prescription medications as people with money. And I don't think anybody should have to pay directly for it.

Whoever "they" is, they should pay. The superior level of pharmaceutical treatment in this country is owing to one thing: private sector research and development and big pharma profits.

Cost per patient is lower in Canada than in the United States, Jay Tea. Prescription drugs cost less. Toyota built two plants in Ontario because we pay for our health care with tax dollars--despite the fact that Alabama (I believe--some southern state, anyway) offered hundreds of millions more in tax incentives. It's good for businesses.


Alabama, yes HB, that's a southern state, already has Mercedes and Honda. Where was Canada in that bidding? Does it surprise you that Alabama would offer the same incentives to attract another manufacturer?
NB: which prescription drugs cost less and why? Who owns the IP for said drugs?

Health care is "socialized" in Japan, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, and probably every other country with a higher standard of living than the United States. While I'm not so naive as to think that throwing money at a problem will fix it, there are concrete numbers available in the Romanow Report that explain exactly how much more money is needed and for what. No tax increases required. We'll pay for it with oil for now, like Norway does. At current tax rates, our budget surplus would cover it (though I'd rather see the money invested in sustainable energy R&D, personally, though I'm a healthy 26 year old so I'm prejudiced in this regard). So, granted, this might not work in the United States, but it worked here for a long time and I'm optimistic that it will improve.

Your suggestion that Canada will pay for whatever you are suggesting with oil profits "for now" does indeed reflect your collective wisdom of twenty six years on this earth. What if the oil profits suddenly disappear as quickly as they suddenly appeared? This has happened multiple times since 1972. Your frame of reference is limited, to put the best spin on it. And you really have no idea whether this revenue source is permanent. So you are just speculating...with healthcare, while we, in the lower 48 are actually paying for it.

The Canadian budget is, in whole, about the size and complexity of approximately five of the largest states in the US. And why do you conveniently ignore the imputed value of Canada being a contiguous country that enjoys all the economic and security benefits that the US offers? Your invocation of any similarity between our economy and that of Canada is meaningless.


I have to head out, but to ... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

I have to head out, but to reply to the bit about Alabama, Honda regrets the decision. After the plant was ready to start producing vehicles, they were forced to install all new signage throughout the plant with pictures because a ton of people couldn't read. They are unhappy with the quality of vehicles produced there, too. I worked for the electrical contractor that redid their signage, and he said there were a lot of angry Japanese people involved in the process. I actually made some of the signs! Not a bad summer job, I suppose.

I actually look forward to when my country stops killing the planet with that abominable tar sands operation, but it's nice to live in an affluent country. We're a smart people, we've weathered some serious economic downturns much more painlessly than you guys, we have an abundance of natural resources, and I'm confident that we will have excellent health care paid for with public funds twenty years from now. But you're right: I'm young, and I might be a gun owning conservative when I'm my dad's age.

Rance's first comment was correct: you probably have nothing to worry about. The provision of health care will still be a business, regardless of whether it's Obama or McCain who wins the election.

And I'm off to pre-drink and go dancing, as is the wont of naive, irresponsible young urbanites. Enjoy the rest of your Saturday evening.

Hyperbolist ....I ... (Below threshold)
OhioVoter:

Hyperbolist ....

I have a number of Canadian friends so I know about as much about Canadian health care as you do about US health care ... not all that much.

The Canadian friend who is most supportive of its health care has been making the same argument - everything will be okey-dokey once Canada gets enough money directed to the problem - since the day I met her. That was over 7 years ago.

She and I have also had a discussion where she actually stated that closing an open skull wound could be considered an "elective" procedure. She is as passionate about the superiority of the Canadian health care system as you seem to be.

What I wondered about was why the rest of our mutual Canadian friends remain silent during those discussions. Finally I found out why.

The vocal supporter is from Toronto - the rest are from various other provinces and territories. The Canadian health care she describes is not the Canadian health care that they are familiar with personally. Apparently a lot more money is needed to simply give all Canadians the health care that some Canadians are getting today but all have been promised.

That's probably why medical tourism is such a lucrative venture in countries with nationalized health care. When some of the citizens can't get into the services they have already paid for, they will look elsewhere for them.

Except the poor, of course, who cannot afford to pay twice for health care and have to wait no matter how long the lines are.

I think you will be sur... (Below threshold)
Linoge Author Profile Page:

I think you will be surprised by how many people in the United States like the idea of "socialized" health care, as it's undeniably a majority at this point.

Not to be crude for a second, but no flipping shit. That majority of people are firmly convinced that "socialized"/universal healthcare == free healthcare, and that is as far as their thought processes go. And who, in their right minds, would turn down something thought to be free?

Of course, that same majority cannot quite seem to grasp the concept that the government, the entity paying for this "universal" health care, does not just sprout money out of its nether regions... and how "free" is a complete, utter, and absolute sham.

My brother works at a Wal-M... (Below threshold)

My brother works at a Wal-Mart in Washington state. He's a janitor - and didn't see any reason to pay what Wal-Mart was wanting in insurance premiums. (Hey, janitor pay at Wal-Mart isn't all that much.)

One day he had some chest pains - then a heart attack hit. He called 911, the ambulance was there in three minutes. He was at the hospital fifteen minutes later. He was on the operating table fifteen minutes after that - and they were putting in stents to open a couple of clogged arteries.

He was discharged from the hospital two days later.

His bill, as presented, was about $75,000. Through various state and government programs, it got reduced to $500 - which was waived by the hospital.

Now, some might say that his heart attack was brought on by a lack of preventive care and regular doctor visits... but how many people who have GOOD health care regularly see their doctor? I'm talking annually - not every 3-6 months for a hand-holding visit or weekly for blatant hypochondria...

(Holds up hand due to high blood pressure... but for 8 years due to a lack of insurance I didn't visit a doctor at all. Didn't get sick, either, with anything OTC meds couldn't handle.)

We have an excellent critical care system that accepts all who need it, regardless of ability to pay. I don't want to see THAT gutted for some hypothetical goverment-owned/controlled health care system that mixes all the capability and efficiency of the Department of Education with the heartfelt concern for well-being of the IRS and the speedy response of the TSA.

When I was born, I was in s... (Below threshold)
Mycroft:

When I was born, I was in socialized medicine - my father was in the Air Force. I was a high risk case - so when they couldn't handle the problem, they sent my mother to the local hospital.

It took 60 days and many specialists to diagnose my cancer. If I had to wait "A week or two" for each of them? I would be dead now.

So take your "socialized medicine for everyone" and stick it where the sun don't shine.

Let me say as both a Canadi... (Below threshold)
John:

Let me say as both a Canadian and Brit that HB is not only ignorant of facts but is also a liar.

He is also a memeber of what is laughingly called the New Democratic Party (NDP) whose philosophy is somewhere between the Liberals (Democrats) and the Communists. You can tell this by the way he knocks the present government that has only been in power since 2006 and of course anything American. He forgets it was the Liberals who made all the cutbacks in Canadas' universal deathcare system. He also fails to mention the millions paid by employers for their employees to get treatment not offered by the "universal" one. Also prescriptions are not covered.


The feds may give money to the provinces to help run the system but the provinces are responsible and set their own rates and what they will cover.

He makes me laugh with his Canada-as-East-Germany comment considering only two other countries have Canada style health care, Cuba and N Korea. These three are the ones that make private medicare illegal. All the other countries allow a private parallel scheme including the UK.
If you were paying in Korea it wasn't socialised medicine it was private just like here in China. Everyone pays but at least gets intant service.

If you want to really see what you are into with Obamanation see these links

http://www.healthcoalition.ca/History.pdf

http://www.cmaj.ca/cgi/reprint/177/2/224.pdf

By the way HB hope you didn't blow all your welfare cheque drinking and dancing although no doubt your mummy nurse will increase your allowance or maybe you can scrounge some more taxpayers money from the ecofreaks you mix with.

John, you don't know what y... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

John, you don't know what you're talking about. Private health care isn't illegal here: I had a hernia repaired at a private clinic two years ago. Lines are being blurred and we will soon have a parallel system, I'm sure. Stephen Harper doesn't like public health care, but doesn't have the political wherewithal to actually challenge it, so he's underfunding it and letting it wither so that people will lose faith in the system. Yes, it's provincially funded, but provinces get much of their funds for it from Ottawa and Ottawa has told provinces such as Ontario to suck it up, cut taxes, and reduce spending. Never mind that spending in Ontario was at a completely sustainable level.

So health care in Korea isn't socialized? Do you think the five dollars I paid to see a specialist and get several prescriptions covered the cost, you twit? It's a processing fee, levied against foreigners.

And I work for one of the largest public opinion and marketing research firms in the world, you ignorant son of a bitch. I was going to be a professor, but I make more money now and get weekends off. Not everybody who likes left-of-center politics is a barista at Starbucks.

HB,I guess you are g... (Below threshold)
Codekeyguy:

HB,
I guess you are getting frustrated with the attack on your "beliefs", eh?
Glad you work for the largest PR firm in the world. (Is it REALLY true that PR firms process crap to make it edible?)
Also, I'm glad you didn't become a professor. Calling a student a SOB if he didn't agree with your left wing rants wouldn't be diplomatic. Don't you agree?

Private health car... (Below threshold)
OhioVoter:
Private health care isn't illegal here: I had a hernia repaired at a private clinic two years ago.

If Canadian health care is all that you have claimed, why on earth would you go to a private clinic for anything?

And if Stephen Harper and conservatives are the only ones to blame for the problems in Canadian health care, two years ago (the year they were elected) you wouldn't have had to go to a private clinic. It would have been BEFORE they had a chance to influence the system.

Actually Codekeyguy HB has ... (Below threshold)
John:

Actually Codekeyguy HB has relapased into the usual language of the Canadian left wing lunatic who has been caught in a lie and has no answer. In fact he would fit right in as a prof in a Canadian uni, i.e. Prof of idiocy and lies. Is it any wonder he works for a public opinion firm. The scumbags who twist the questions to get the answer they want. Bet it's the one for the Communist Brocasting Company.

What he doesn't tell you is it is left wing kooky parties NDP & Libs who will never allow a parallel private system, and as they outnumber Harpers' government there is no way he could push it through. Just an example of lying by omission you know good PR work.

The only place he could have got a private op was in Quebec. His other left wing pals thLibs were threatening to penalise Alberta for starting private clinics. In Ontario the Libs through a fit when they heard that a US company were sending a mobile medical unit to give seniors a full check up for a fee. The held a special session to pass a law forbiding senior from spending their own money on their own health. Something you cannot get in Canada.

So until the Canada Health act is changed there will be no official private medicare in Canada. If this is the mess you Americans want so be it, but if you haven't already go check the links I put up on my previous comment.

Forgot to add, the only oth... (Below threshold)
John:

Forgot to add, the only other way HB could have got private care was if he is a politician or an ex one. Which is how Obamanation will treat the peons of America. Private for him and his pals, socialised for everyone else.

25 years ago I lived and pr... (Below threshold)
epador:

25 years ago I lived and practiced in a northern border state, and the same problems that now "will be fixed as soon as the government throws enough money at healthcare" were just as serious and prevalent then. Probably before HB was born. The ex-Canadian docs who came to work there from urban settings as well as rural, came both for better pay and better chance to use modern advances freely.

I'm currently working in a community run clinic that is designed to provide healthcare access to those without insurance or economic resources, but we still require a nominal (relatively speaking) fee for each visit. Its a struggle to keep the place open, but the alternative is to leave thousands of county residents access to health care to emergency rooms of the two county hospitals. How do we manage to stay open? Medicaid pays us 5-10 times what it pays community physicians, and we use the funds to help support care for everyone who doesn't have insurance. While there's no wait to be seen by a Primary Care provider, trying to get referrals for serious problems can be frustrating and take months.

Its a crazy system, but less crazy than Universal health care systems. We manage to help take the strain off the "for profit" systems so they can continue to offer excellent care to the rest of the population.

My husband lost both grandp... (Below threshold)
AJG:

My husband lost both grandparents to the Canadian Healthcare system (misdiagnosis, lack of treatment, etc.) His dad (Canadian citizen, here in the states on a work visa) refused to visit family in Canada back when he was having severe hip problems because he was afraid of what would happen if he needed care in Canada. He has since had hip replacement surgery here in the states. He staunchly maintains that had he been living in Canada, he'd be in a wheelchair by now rather than still active and employed.




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