« You can't fool me | Main | In My Own Sweet Tyrannical Way »

Is Yahoo censoring news at their website?

During some web surfing today, I made some interesting discoveries. Here is a AP article available directly at Yahoo-

ESSEX, Vt. - A motorist led police on a chase that ended when his vehicle hit a tree and he fled, leaving his pregnant girlfriend behind, authorities said. A police officer who suspected the man of speeding tried to pull him over early Monday.

Lt. Robin Hollwedel said the man then lead officers on a short chase in which his vehicle clipped a house and rammed a tree.

"He hit the corner of it. The tree stopped him more than the house did," Hollwedel said.

The man then got out and fled on foot, leaving his girlfriend -- who is 8 months pregnant -- in the car, according to Hollwedel. The woman, whose name wasn't released, was unhurt but was taken to a hospital as a precaution.

The man, whose driver's license is suspended, made a voluntary appearance at police headquarters along with his attorney later Monday.

He was cited for careless and negligent operation of a motor vehicle, attempting to elude a law enforcement officer and a probation violation before being released, police said.

Here's the same article via a Vermont newspaper website-

ESSEX -- A motorist led police on a chase that ended when his vehicle hit a tree and he fled -- leaving his pregnant girlfriend behind, authorities said.

A police officer who suspected Denis Hodzic, 23, of speeding tried to pull him over early Monday, but Hodzic led him on a short chase in which Hodzic's vehicle clipped a house on Oneida Avenue and rammed a tree, according to Lt. Robin Hollwedel.

"He hit the corner of it. The tree stopped him more than the house did," Hollwedel said.

Hodzic then got out and fled on foot, leaving his girlfriend -- who is eight months pregnant -- in the car, according to Hollwedel.

The woman, whose name wasn't released, was unhurt but was taken to a hospital as a precaution.

Hodzic, whose driver's license is suspended, made a voluntary appearance at police headquarters along with his attorney later Monday.

He was cited for careless and negligent operation of a motor vehicle, attempting to elude a law enforcement officer and a probation violation before being released, police said.

Does anyone notice the difference between the two articles? One names the driver of the car, and the other doesn't. Both are from AP.

This isn't the only example I found today. Here's a story from out in California. First from Yahoo-

SAN JOSE, Calif. - A drunken man broke into a small airport and tried to fill up his car's gas tank with jet fuel, police said. Police arrested the man, 20, on Sunday night for driving while intoxicated and attempted theft.

The man probably wasn't trying to save money. The aviation fuel in the pumps used for aircraft and race cars, was going for $5.97 a gallon, accessed by a credit card, authorities said.

"We've had people try and steal gas here in the past," said Jim Meide, who works in operations at the county-run Reid-Hillview Airport in East San Jose.

Now here is the same news thanks to the San Francisco Chronicle-

(07-29) 05:15 PDT San Jose, CA (AP) A drunken man broke into a small airport and tried to fill up his car's gas tank with jet fuel, police said.

Police arrested Justin Rodebush, 20, on Sunday night for driving while intoxicated and attempted theft.

He probably wasn't trying to save money. The aviation fuel in the pumps used for aircraft and race cars, was going for $5.97 a gallon, accessed by a credit card, authorities said.

"We've had people try and steal gas here in the past," said Jim Meide, who works in operations at the county-run Reid-Hillview Airport in East San Jose.

Why have two articles been altered to take the name of the criminal out of them? I've been noticing for some time, how the names are not in some news articles. Usually involving Reuters. I'll give one example, back in 2006 a man in London shot a rocket out of his buttocks. The Reuters version of the story never named the man, the London Times did.

If anyone wants to read about that knucklehead named Andrew Tilley, click here. The reason I notice this, is because I regularly troll Yahoo news looking for Knucklehead material, or just plain odd news. Why would two versions of the same news be put out by AP, one with it, one without it? Seems like a lot of trouble to me. Anyone want to speculate what as to what could be happening here? There are other differences in the articles, feel free to tell me if I'm being off base.


TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
/cgi-bin/mt-tb.cgi/30760.

Comments (14)

Bill, at first blush, it se... (Below threshold)

Bill, at first blush, it seems to me that there may be legal reasons to leave the name out of the article. Other than that, I'm not sure why they'd go out of their way to omit the name. I'd love to see an attorney's take on that.

Legal reason? If the perso... (Below threshold)
GarandFan:

Legal reason? If the person has been arrested or cited, it should be public record. Maybe it has to be a felony before they'll name names?

Next think you know, they'l... (Below threshold)

Next think you know, they'll be mentioning only one political party whenever some scandal breaks.

I'd say that different news... (Below threshold)
MikeW:

I'd say that different news outlets have differing standards to when a name can be disclosed. I don't think there's a legal reason that the name can't be published, but some would just have the policy that unless the person is particularly newsworthy, they remain anonymous. I don't really think there's any point in reading any more into it.

The pattern from your examp... (Below threshold)
Brian:

The pattern from your examples seems to be that the local outlets (newspaper sites) have the name, but the national outlets (Yahoo, AP) omit it. I'd guess this is AP providing "local" and "national" versions of the same article. Presumably local readers care about the name because they might know the guy, but someone in Montana probably doesn't care about the name of the guy in Vermont. Plus, "the man" is a lot shorter than "Justin Rodebush, 20".

Yeah, MikeW has a point, in... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

Yeah, MikeW has a point, in each case you cite here one is a local version and the other is not. It's probably just an editorial rule.

Different countries have di... (Below threshold)

Different countries have different laws regarding release of that info, no? Canada seems a bit more reluctant to publish pre-trial conclusion info among others. So an international news distributor may have multiple feeds for different privacy policies, but in the freer countries it would still be up to the buyer (Yahoo, etc.) to decide which feed to run.

I don't think there is a conspiracy here...

"a man in London shot a roc... (Below threshold)

"a man in London shot a rocket out of his buttocks"

I've done this several times, but not on purpose!

It's possible that one was ... (Below threshold)

It's possible that one was released earlier to 'get it out' and the name was added later as it became available through public records, etc. I don't think it has anything to do with censorship, personally. As a regular user of Yahoo news, that's not one of the things I've noticed about it. A far bigger problem is the misleading (you can see an example by clicking my name) and regularly-shifting main page 'headlines' that link to the top stories. I've complained to Yahoo about this before and they claim that they don't 'control' the 'headlines'. I suspect that is you-know-what, personally. But someone, a liberal someone, has demonstrated influence on those headlines. One notable example was last January - one of the headlines was "Dems set to elect first female House Speaker". A very short time later that headline was edited to read "Democrats set to elect first female House Speaker". The donkeys were feeling a little cranky about how they were being referred to around that time, if I recall.

Yahoo has also been quite liberal (pun intended) witht he use of the term 'domestic spying' in their headlines about the international surveillance program. They even use 'domesticspying' in their page names, even though the story doesn't use the term.

So, while there appears to be some fooling around with the news links at Yahoo, I haven't really seen any blanket editing or censoring, not like Google, certainly (which is why I use Yahoo instead of Google).

The 'local' vs. 'national' take is also a decent explanation. A local paper might run the 'long version' of a story while other places just want the shorter 'blurb' version.

I imagine they're paving th... (Below threshold)
Baron Von Ottomatic:

I imagine they're paving the way for omitting altogether the names of Democrats who are indicted/arrested in the future.

Yeah, MikeW has a... (Below threshold)
Brian:

Yeah, MikeW has a point

Wow, Oyster, you can't even properly credit me when you agree with me! :-P

Brian:I agree with... (Below threshold)

Brian:

I agree with you, and voted your comment up. Feel better? ;-)

It is local vs other market... (Below threshold)
hcddbz:

It is local vs other markets. Back in the 80's i belonged to compuserv and they had Executive News service. It allowed you to get wire services (UPI, API,AP,Reuters) news delivered to you. It also provide that you could get articles from world news papers. The same articles varied by content depending on where published.

Some of the previous commen... (Below threshold)
pennywit:

Some of the previous commenters have the right of it.

Typically, the AP "coverage" of one of these mostly local, but kind of odd/funny stories starts out with the local newspaper running a full article, names and everything. The local or state AP bureau will grab the article, trim it of local color, and slap an AP byline on it.

If the story catches the eye of a national-level editor, that editor will grab the regional article, snip out some more local color, and perhaps even snip out names if they're not important enough.

Complicating this is the fact that for some reason, old-school reporters learn not to put proper names in leads unless the name is Jesus or Elvis. It's pain-in-the-ass rule, quite frankly. So, if you're snipping the unimportant parts of a locally generated story to put it in the national AP "Ain't this local news WACKY!" roundup, you're probably going to trim a few names.

Either that, or some editor at Yahoo! has decided to screw with Bill Jempty's mind.

--|PW|--




Advertisements









rightads.gif

beltwaybloggers.gif

insiderslogo.jpg

mba_blue.gif

Follow Wizbang

Follow Wizbang on FacebookFollow Wizbang on TwitterSubscribe to Wizbang feedWizbang Mobile

Contact

Send e-mail tips to us:

[email protected]

Fresh Links

Credits

Section Editor: Maggie Whitton

Editors: Jay Tea, Lorie Byrd, Kim Priestap, DJ Drummond, Michael Laprarie, Baron Von Ottomatic, Shawn Mallow, Rick, Dan Karipides, Michael Avitablile, Charlie Quidnunc, Steve Schippert

Emeritus: Paul, Mary Katherine Ham, Jim Addison, Alexander K. McClure, Cassy Fiano, Bill Jempty, John Stansbury, Rob Port

In Memorium: HughS

All original content copyright © 2003-2010 by Wizbang®, LLC. All rights reserved. Wizbang® is a registered service mark.

Powered by Movable Type Pro 4.361

Hosting by ServInt

Ratings on this site are powered by the Ajax Ratings Pro plugin for Movable Type.

Search on this site is powered by the FastSearch plugin for Movable Type.

Blogrolls on this site are powered by the MT-Blogroll.

Temporary site design is based on Cutline and Cutline for MT. Graphics by Apothegm Designs.

Author Login



Terms Of Service

DCMA Compliance Notice

Privacy Policy