« Not 1976 | Main | No Laugh-A-Minute »

Homecoming: Back To Threat Awareness

With the election decided and debates debated, it's time for me to return home and focus on what drives me: Monitoring, analyzing and explaining the various threats we face, seen and unseen.

I'm not leaving Wizbang by any means, but rather returning my primary focus back home to "dance with who brung ya." I still remain conflicted between what is most critical, "Supporting security by enhancing awareness" or preserving and/or restoring exactly what we are defending in the first place.

But regardless of the answer, the fact remains that there are a great many contributing to the latter discussion while there are precious few willing to focus, dedicate the countless hours required for the tomes of reading and to do the leg work necessary to meaningfully contribute to the former.

No matter what anyone ever tells you, politics is easy - so long as you understand and maintain your core principles and apply them to everything you see, read and say. It only gets complicated or difficult when you compromise or sacrifice these principles. Period. It's why populists' careers are like minefields expanding exponentially and commensurate with the lengths of their careers.

Luckily for me, neither politics nor national security-related arenas seem like work, regardless of the number of hours spent and sleep lost. Simply put, the need for contribution (not to be confused with importance) is greater in one than the other, so that's where I migrate.

At home over at ThreatsWatch, there is necessarily little latitude for the purely political. I am grateful to Kevin for affording me such an outlet at Wizbang and grateful to the other contributors and readers for tolerating my sometimes-ranting intrusions. I expect to modify my activity toward something more akin to a longer weekly piece here focusing on defining various conservative principles and how they are applied (or absent) in policy and function.

Having already shifted gears, today provides a decent sample of the kinds of security-related things readers here (whom I affectionately refer to as Wizbangers) can expect to find daily at ThreatsWatch.

Less regularly, I will also contribute similarly at The Tank at NRO, such as this today which includes video of Obama's campaign pledge to supporters to essentially gut critical components of the Defense Department:

Soon at ThreatsWatch, we will be upgrading the platform to afford for some community building which will eventually include registered user-based streams of data (via e-mail and other delivery) and potentially some form of registered user-generated content (such as discussion forums and/or hosted user blogs) as well as other new features. Decisions have not been finalized and wrinkles do need some ironing, but the point is to engage readers rather than sit static. It's coming.

As always, suggestions and feedback are as welcomed as they are important.

At any rate, there's never a dull day in the world and something significant is always happening. It's time for me to get back to my primary task of looking for it and sharing what I see, and trying to put it into a daily context. But always remember, it's critical that we continue to work towards preserving and/or restoring exactly what we are defending in the first place.


TrackBack

TrackBack URL for this entry:
/cgi-bin/mt-tb.cgi/32862.

Comments (9)

don't forget the threat of ... (Below threshold)

don't forget the threat of a media that relentlessly pushes it own agenda in EVERYTHING it does! Example:

A/P headline: "Gun enthusiasts stocking up over fears of Democratic crackdown"

Gun enthusiasts??

hmmmm...how about:

"Sandbag enthusiasts stocking up as cracks in dam widen"

"Plywood enthusiasts stocking up as hurricane approaches"

"Snow-shovel enthusiasts stocking up as record cold Winter is forecast" [true, btw]

"STOCKING UP" on something you're going to NEED...and may be denied you...doesn't make you an "enthusiast"!! It makes you a SURVIVOR!

Steve, you write very well.... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Steve, you write very well.

Steve,Best of luck... (Below threshold)
Sheik Yur Bouty:

Steve,

Best of luck to you! I've enjoyed reading your writing here!

"as you understand... (Below threshold)
Knightbrigade:
"as you understand and maintain your core principles and apply them to everything you see, read and say."

That says it ALL!!! ..If done in every aspect of life, we would all be better off.
Great approach!!

Steve -
Thanks for all your posts, and I'll be looking in at ThreatsWatch to see what's up.

Thanks to all, particularly... (Below threshold)
Steve Schippert:

Thanks to all, particularly your kind words, hyperbolist.

FWIW, don't go wishing me well as if you're seeing me off aboard ship at the Norfolk naval base. I'll still be posting here [ sorry, hyperbolist :) ] just not nearly as regularly.

All that said...

After reading this hours after first scribbling it, I actually think it sounds a bit like a self-eulogy and a touch whiny or self-congratulatory for all my apparently massive sacrifices. The latter is particularly embarrassing to sense. I may not sleep much due to allotted time, but I wake each morning to my family in my own home. I've been deployed (Gulf War) and know there are greater sacrifices than some fool's late hours. I've returned when others haven't, and know there are sacrifices by entire families that few can fathom.

I sincerely regret prattling on about hours spent doing whatever when I wake each day to my wife and kids. I sacrifice squat. I just work.

Steve:I second hyp... (Below threshold)

Steve:

I second hyperbolist. I wish I could write a fraction as well as you do. I'll be going to ThreatsWatch a lot more frequently now.

Well, Tom, for what it's wo... (Below threshold)
Steve Schippert:

Well, Tom, for what it's worth, I don't spend much time thinking about what I write. I guess that's a good thing if you like how I write, but I can attest that it's also a bad thing. I have gone off before on rants that have proved wholly unwarranted. That is embarrassing.

I think anyone can be a good writer. Most people think relatively clearly. If they just wrote what they think instead of working so hard at 'writing,' they'd fare much better.

It was in high school that I learned I in fact did NOT want to become a journalist. My (very liberal) English and Creative Writing teacher was a stickler for distinguishing between reporting and editorializing, and conveyed to me that journalism is a very dull business.

That's when I took his Creative Writing course instead. And the old guy - who looked remarkably like the guy in My Favorite Martian - unlocked something in me with a grueling stream-of-thought homework exercise.

We were to write, pen to paper, always scribbling and never stopping, for one full hour. Whatever was in your head you wrote. if you went blank, you keep writing anyway. I 'went blank' after about ten minutes and just started writing the word "blank." Or so I thought. What spilled out was a curious little bit - about 6 pages - worthy of George Carlin (childhood hero who I came to almost detest later in life), on the many ways to express going blank and having nothing to say at all. It was nearly as funny as The Seven Words You Can't Say on TV' and his 5 minute montage of why not and how you can't.

Lesson: Just write. From your head to paper or keyboard. When you become fairly well versed in a subject and equally comfortable in your own skin, words just flow.

A lot of people put a lot of emphasis on vocabulary and structure. I do not. While my head plots the major points and then expands each, I think the art of explaining and analogy is far more important, unless you are writing for Britanica, which should bore most mere mortals into an early grave.

Two cents. Try it. It's free.

Steve, I found your initial... (Below threshold)

Steve, I found your initial posts here to be especially informative, as the wider world of threats that any of us face has been a point of interest for me since the first Gulf War. This is not to say that your political "rantings" haven't been interesting. They have. One is tied to the other, as you say. You seem to have a strong foundation on which your political philosophy rests and that is primarily in your love of country and a readiness to embrace all that is good about it. From that, the desire to protect it comes naturally. It should for all of us.

Thank you, and I look forward to more.

Thanks Steve. I'll give th... (Below threshold)

Thanks Steve. I'll give that a try. :-)




Advertisements









rightads.gif

beltwaybloggers.gif

insiderslogo.jpg

mba_blue.gif

Follow Wizbang

Follow Wizbang on FacebookFollow Wizbang on TwitterSubscribe to Wizbang feedWizbang Mobile

Contact

Send e-mail tips to us:

[email protected]

Fresh Links

Credits

Section Editor: Maggie Whitton

Editors: Jay Tea, Lorie Byrd, Kim Priestap, DJ Drummond, Michael Laprarie, Baron Von Ottomatic, Shawn Mallow, Rick, Dan Karipides, Michael Avitablile, Charlie Quidnunc, Steve Schippert

Emeritus: Paul, Mary Katherine Ham, Jim Addison, Alexander K. McClure, Cassy Fiano, Bill Jempty, John Stansbury, Rob Port

In Memorium: HughS

All original content copyright © 2003-2010 by Wizbang®, LLC. All rights reserved. Wizbang® is a registered service mark.

Powered by Movable Type Pro 4.361

Hosting by ServInt

Ratings on this site are powered by the Ajax Ratings Pro plugin for Movable Type.

Search on this site is powered by the FastSearch plugin for Movable Type.

Blogrolls on this site are powered by the MT-Blogroll.

Temporary site design is based on Cutline and Cutline for MT. Graphics by Apothegm Designs.

Author Login



Terms Of Service

DCMA Compliance Notice

Privacy Policy