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Dumb, very dumb, move by Royal Caribbean

I watched a Haiti segment tonight on CBS' 60 Minutes... it was riveting, tragic, gut wrenching, sickening, appalling and more.  There were interviews with American surgeons using rum and vodka as alcohol replacements, hack saws as instruments of amputations... and compassion... so much compassion.

Also shown were bulldozers being used in one makeshift outdoor morgue to bury the hundreds of victims dumped there by family, friends and officials charged with doing something with the dead.

It reminded me of the grainy holocaust scenes filmed in Germany so many years ago except it's now and it's Haiti.  The missus and I watched in silence.  We should all be watching.

Juxtapose those described scenes with what follows and tell me that the decision-makers involved are doing the right thing:

Sixty miles from Haiti's devastated earthquake zone, luxury liners dock at private beaches where passengers enjoy jet ski rides, parasailing and rum cocktails delivered to their hammocks.

The 4,370-berth Independence of the Seas, owned by Royal Caribbean International, disembarked at the heavily guarded resort of Labadee on the north coast on Friday; a second cruise ship, the 3,100-passenger Navigator of the Seas is due to dock.

The Florida cruise company leases a picturesque wooded peninsula and its five pristine beaches from the government for passengers to "cut loose" with watersports, barbecues, and shopping for trinkets at a craft market before returning on board before dusk. Safety is guaranteed by armed guards at the gate.

The decision to go ahead with the visit has divided passengers. The ships carry some food aid, and the cruise line has pledged to donate all proceeds from the visit to help stricken Haitians. But many passengers will stay aboard when they dock; one said he was "sickened".

"I just can't see myself sunning on the beach, playing in the water, eating a barbecue, and enjoying a cocktail while [in Port-au-Prince] there are tens of thousands of dead people being piled up on the streets, with the survivors stunned and looking for food and water," one passenger wrote on the Cruise Critic internet forum.

"It was hard enough to sit and eat a picnic lunch at Labadee before the quake, knowing how many Haitians were starving," said another. "I can't imagine having to choke down a burger there now.''

Some booked on ships scheduled to stop at Labadee are afraid that desperate people might breach the resort's 12ft high fences to get food and drink, but others seemed determined to enjoy their holiday."I'll be there on Tuesday and I plan on enjoying my zip line excursion as well as the time on the beach," said one.

The company said the question of whether to "deliver a vacation experience so close to the epicentre of an earthquake" had been subject to considerable internal debate before it decided to include Haiti in its itineraries for the coming weeks.

"In the end, Labadee is critical to Haiti's recovery; hundreds of people rely on Labadee for their livelihood," said John Weis, vice-president. "In our conversations with the UN special envoy of the government of Haiti, Leslie Voltaire, he notes that Haiti will benefit from the revenues that are generated from each call ...

"We also have tremendous opportunities to use our ships as transport vessels for relief supplies and personnel to Haiti. Simply put, we cannot abandon Haiti now that they need us most."

I think there's a need... and I think cruise ships could be used to fulfill that need... but to vacation less than one hundred miles from where perhaps 200,000 are dead and where millions are suffering... I can't fathom it...

Call me a softee, a liberal even... but there's something terribly wrong about it.

Crossposted(*).


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Comments (32)

I am not sure what governme... (Below threshold)
Brett Buck:

I am not sure what government under which the ship is registered, but if I were running it, I would commandeer it for rescue efforts.

Why stop at the water's edg... (Below threshold)

Why stop at the water's edge, why stop at 100 miles away? If people in Haiti are suffering, why should you be able to do anything fun? In fact, until everybody in Haiti is taking care of, no one should have fun. If the passengers have to sit in their cabins, how about you sit at home in a sign of camaraderie? and without watching football. Why stop at commandeering the cruise ship, how about we stop by your place and grab anything we think could help? If you think it's okay to pressure passengers into giving up what they've paid for (and without any suggestion on your part of compensating them), how about we pressure you into giving up something of equal value? If you think it's okay to idle whatever number of Haitians who work at the resort, how about you take some unpaid time off in support?

Yeah, yeah, we get it, you feel bad about what happened. But that doesn't mean you get to trample other people's rights or take their property... either to force them to help or to make yourself feel better.

Liberal seems to fit.

How about just skipping Hai... (Below threshold)
Rick:

How about just skipping Haiti and moving on to some other Caribbean hotspot Steve?

Is that too freakin' much bud?

Sheez... what a damned loon...

The Royal Caribbean manager... (Below threshold)
Edward Sisson Author Profile Page:

The Royal Caribbean manager has a point -- the visits produce income to Haiti, and the biggest problem in Haiti is lack of income-producing activities. This is the kind of scenario that philosophy professors would make-up as a basis for a discussion of morals -- but in fact it is real-life. Should the people who planned vacations in the Caribbean give up their vacations? Should the company give up its income -- and thereby deprive Haiti of earnings? Of course it looks terrible to see some people enjoying themselves so near to so many who are suffering so much, but Haiti needs long-term income and vacation travel is one such source of long-term income. This is not such an easy question as it initially appears.

"I'll be there on Tuesda... (Below threshold)

"I'll be there on Tuesday and I plan on enjoying my zip line excursion as well as the time on the beach," said one.

Democrat.

The commentary from these c... (Below threshold)
rookwood:

The commentary from these concerned passengers turn my stomach more than any part of this story.

I've been cruising the Caribbean for nearly 35 years and my most favorite island was Haiti. Years ago it became unsafe for visitors, so the cruise lines removed this stop from their iteneraries.

The Haitian's are the second most impoverished people in the world. And given the tyranny they have lived under since before the heavy hand of Papa Doc Duvalier and his son Baby Doc, they remain innocent and caring people. If you spent a day amongst these people, you would be left with a memory never to be forgotten...I haven't since my first visit in the 70s.

How dare people feign sympathy while sitting in their deck chairs or on the beach...they will have forgotten the Haitian's before their ship hits home port.

The cruise line should have taken the moral high road and by-passed Haiti. This is common practice when bad weather or on-the-ground political unrest occurs and there are many options available to them. Nice sight for the Haitians to see peering thru the fences - PARTY BOATS!!!

I totally agree with Royal ... (Below threshold)
Village Idiot:

I totally agree with Royal Caribbean here.

How does it help Haiti to devastate their economy further by pulling out of the tourism industry there? That does them no favors, it just hurts them more.

Plus the ship is bringing some aid. There is no good reason not to be there.

Look at it this way. Would the hatians who have jobs helping these ships want the ship to stay or leave?? What you are arguing is against the interest of the country you are supposedly standing up for.

I remember hearing stories ... (Below threshold)
Sean Sorrentino:

I remember hearing stories about how the total lack of tourism in Thailand after the tsunami really screwed their economy. The tsunami wwrecked some of the coast, but no one wanted to fly into Bankok, hundreds of miles away. We would all like to help, but how? Unless RC plans on shanghaiing an entire shipload of senior citizens to Port au Prince and impressing them into service as stevadores, i'm not sure what they could do.

So if I am to understand co... (Below threshold)
Paul:

So if I am to understand correctly your only problem is the proximity to the disaster? If they were farther away you would have no problem with them partying? That sounds pretty liberal to me. That kind of logic allows you to watch post season football on your couch and still feel morally superior to other groups of people.

Having only been on one cru... (Below threshold)

Having only been on one cruise, I seem to remember making reservations months in advance, having to fly 2,000 miles to get there, and spending roughly $4000 for our week, not counting excursions, etc. These are not spur of the moment things where people say, "let's go vacation in Haiti because prices are cheaper after the quake."

People save for years to go on a cruise and while it certainly suck that there is some natural disaster somewhere and people die and they live in poverty and they need aid, why should we feel worse about what is happening in Haiti than what is happening in Darfur or Rawanda or Nigeria or... I mean, I am not taking a cruise there any time soon, but same general point...

And if folks remember, our government did commandeer cruise ships after Katrina. With travel revenues down, I bet Carnival and Royal would love it...

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/09/27/AR2005092701960.html

I'm glad Royal Caribbean ha... (Below threshold)

I'm glad Royal Caribbean has the nerve and good sense not to cancel the cruises or change the routes/venues.

What good would it do to put even more Haitians out of work?

If this was a port that the... (Below threshold)
Wayne:

If this was a port that they could use to ship in supplies, you would have a point. Supposedly the relief effort is using all available useable port. Either they are lying or this place is isolated from where the carnage is. If so ,then as many have already stated, their actions is no less wrong than anyone watching football, going to a pub or continuing their lives anywhere else.

It is just another example of the MSM playing with people's emotion.

I found the passenger comme... (Below threshold)
Arizona CJ:

I found the passenger comments sickening.

HOWEVER, no disrespect intended, but I also found the blog post by Rick to be... very problematic.

The issue some of the commentators raised is spot-on; changing venue would only hurt Haiti. They need that revenue, now more than ever.

Does having a cruise ship go in look bad? Sure does. But what is imporant here? Appearances, or real effect? The real effect is that Haiti's economy needs that money, and canceling it for appearance's sake is just cruel.

The "Liberal" appellation, I'm afraid, fits; Liberals are, after all, noted for making awful decisions based on appearance, rather than substance.

The real criteria here should be: what is best for Haiti? Another blow to their economy surely doesn't fir the bill.

Sometimes, the right choice isn't the easy one.

The cruise could easily hav... (Below threshold)
klrtz1:

The cruise could easily have been switched to another location. Someone at Carnival decided to compromise. A compromise is always open to criticism from both sides.

For the other side, talk to the Carnival board of directors or their stockholders. This cruise is not making more money for Carnival. Carnival is helping Haiti and still receiving negative press for it. Tell me how you think that will affect their decision next time? I predict a new company policy to prevent any repeat.

And then there's the fact that the Guardian may just be lying to you. Ever think of that?

I agree with the notion of ... (Below threshold)
katie:

I agree with the notion of closing down the Haitian resort section of the Royal Carribbean cruises right now. It's sickening to me to think of people pleasure-seeking miles from such devastation.
My husband and I were there in June of '08 (my husband was there on business on the ship. Our trip was financed by his boss.) It was the Liberty of the Seas. When I asked about the tall fence around the area, I was told it was for our safety, as the Haitians were untrustworthy and perhaps dangerous. Even then, I felt pangs of guilt and felt hedonistic. My hubby said it was good for them; it provided jobs.
Right now though, it should most definitely be used for aid, and all the ships' fleets, too. But, I guess it's like belling the cat; Easy to say, hard to execute. The cruising market is in a slump in this economy, and it would be damned heroic for RC to turn their ships over to humanitarian purposes. Unfortunately, businesses aren't known for humanitarianism. They're just trying to stay afloat (no pun intended).

I was at my office on 9/11 ... (Below threshold)
WildWillie:

I was at my office on 9/11 2001 when the planes hit the towers. We were riveted to the television not really comprehending what happened or why. So many innocent people. Then the towers collapsed and I saw video of the Pentagon. Totally devasted and wiped out. The next day however, I was back at work. Life goes on. Same when Katrina happened. Most of the evacuee's wound up in my city of Houston. My hospital sent people to help in the triage process, but I still had my work. Life goes on. That is heartless. It is a fact. ww

Seems some of us are talkin... (Below threshold)
Rick:

Seems some of us are talking past each other.

Life certainly goes on... work must continue... vacations even for a variety of reasons...

But why can't Haiti, while corpses are rotting in the street, be skipped as a port of call by Royal Caribbean? Why can't they donate (since they're stating they're doing so anyway) that amount of income lost by locals due to that skipping?

Conservatives are quickly charged with being cold and compassionless and far too often falsely so... but to suggest that people ought to be vacationing (not working) within 60 miles of where the dead are rotting and where the living are suffering immeasurably does nothing but to foment cold and compassionless charge...

I think we're all aware that RC could do a number of things both to avoid the insensitivity and the loss of income to locals... very easily...

This isn't anywhere near as complicated as some would suggest...

Sorry Rick, I fail to see h... (Below threshold)
Mike in Oregon:

Sorry Rick, I fail to see how watching NFL games yesterday in Miami is much different from vacationing within 60 miles of the devastation in Haiti. The cruise ship was at least helping the locals who have jobs supporting that industry. Sending the ship to another island would only hurt Haiti. Why would that make you feel better?

Several of you have mention... (Below threshold)
ryan a:

Several of you have mentioned that these cruises are adding a critical source of revenue for Haiti. Granted, the cruise ship industry does rent land from the government, so a certain amount of income is generated--but that goes to the government, and does not necessarily benefit the population as a whole in any direct or significant way.

In the case of cruise ship tourism the vast majority of revenue goes to the the cruise ship companies themselves. That's just how it works. And that's why they are all inclusive. The actual interaction with "local" populations is often pretty minimal. This is why they lease small islands, or, in this case, a peninsula.

Notice this paragraph:

The Florida cruise company leases a picturesque wooded peninsula and its five pristine beaches from the government for passengers to "cut loose" with watersports, barbecues, and shopping for trinkets at a craft market before returning on board before dusk. Safety is guaranteed by armed guards at the gate.

Tourists on cruise ships are generally given a certain amount of time, and they are expected to stay within well controlled and protected areas. Notice the armed guards, and the fact that people return to the ship before dusk? Not a lot of interaction going on here.

And this paragraph:

Some booked on ships scheduled to stop at Labadee are afraid that desperate people might breach the resort's 12ft high fences to get food and drink, but others seemed determined to enjoy their holiday."I'll be there on Tuesday and I plan on enjoying my zip line excursion as well as the time on the beach," said one.

Notice the 12 FOOT HIGH FENCE? As with tourism in the Dominican Republic, tourists are often kept well away from local populations. Some people are generally allowed into tourist zones, but often tourist companies, cruise ship companies, and hoteliers work pretty hard to keep people out. I know more about how this works in Mexico than in Haiti though. Similar issues.

The point is that tourism revenue in these cases generally pretty limited. So don't kid yourselves in thinking that these revenues are doing much to "help" Haiti during a time of crisis.

If you actually want to contribute something to people who ARE helping out, look here (this is a pretty respectable organization, headed by the medical anthropologist Paul Farmer):

http://www.standwithhaiti.org/haiti

Mike,Sorr... (Below threshold)
ryan a:

Mike,

Sorry Rick, I fail to see how watching NFL games yesterday in Miami is much different from vacationing within 60 miles of the devastation in Haiti.

Are you serious??? Imagine if some cruise ship company proposed to send a ship to New York in the weeks after 9/11. Do you really think that would have been a respectful, let alone supportive thing to do? Hardly. And my guess is that many people would have been pretty angry that anyone would even think about such a thing in the face of such a tragedy.

Sitting at home watching TV has NOTHING to do with Haiti, and it does not affect people one way one another. But actually traveling to a poverty stricken island that is experiencing this level of devastation...FOR TOURISM? That, in my opinion, is absolutely ridiculous. I am not sure how or why someone could muster the audacity to cruise to Haiti to play on ziplines and rented beaches at a time like this.

In my opinion, the most reasonable thing that these cruise ships could do is work as hard as they can to help the relief effort. If they actually give a damn about what is happening to the people of Haiti and have even a modicum of compassion.

The cruise ship was at least helping the locals who have jobs supporting that industry.

They are doing that, and they are promising to donate the proceeds of the cruise. So at least that's good. But, all things considered, I think they could do a lot better. They have a vital means of transporting goods, service, and people into a place that needs some serious assistance. I personally do not think that this is the time to be transporting tourists to the island. They should be taking doctors, if anything.

Another link:

http://standwithhaiti.org/haiti/news-entry/building-back-better-op-ed/

Very Progressive, Rick. Yo... (Below threshold)
twolaneflash:

Very Progressive, Rick. Your conscience is pricked, so someone else should give up what they have to make you feel better? Perhaps it is not Royal Carribean's to give away, having contracted their ship and time to the passengers on board. Perhaps they gave at the office. You would do better to invoke The Good Samaritan, who helped a stranger because he was there and in need. By being there, RC provides a benefit to Haiti and Haitians, and have promised to give money, which they are best positioned to give without endangering their passengers and property. The passengers are free to abandon ship to give aid or to become part of the Haitian problem, to empty their pockets and suitcases for the locals or to spend it all at the bar, to fulfill their dreams of a cruise in paradise or to drown themselves in sympathy for all the world's suffering masses. Benevolence through confiscation is fascism, or the present government in America. I understand your confusion about whose responsibility it is to pull my neighbor's ox out of the ditch. This "Let's you and him help those people" screed reminds me of the guy who's always saying: "Let's you and him fight.". I'm walking away now.

twolaneflash,<blockqu... (Below threshold)
ryan a:

twolaneflash,

By being there, RC provides a benefit to Haiti and Haitians, and have promised to give money, which they are best positioned to give without endangering their passengers and property.

If you knew anything about the cruise ship industry and who receives the actual economic benefits, then you would not make this claim. The revenues go to the cruise operators, and a little bit finds its way to the people whose islands are toured. That's just the ways things work in a lot of international tourism.

There is a reason why RC rents land from the government, and why tourists are only allowed to go to designated places for designated periods of time. There are reasons why there are 12 foot fences and security guards. Cruise ship tourism--throughout the Caribbean--is more about international companies using resources (beaches, islands, waterways) than it is about any substantial economic commerce between local populations and tourists. A lot of tourism is actually about keeping those two apart, whether in the Caribbean, Mexico, the Dominican Republic, or elsewhere.

The BEST thing that RC has done is bring some food and other goods, and promise to donate. If they are actually concerned about what is happening to the people of Haiti, then they will find ways to assist in their own way. Again, I definitely do not think that this is the time to bring tourists to the island.

Somehow, I seriously doubt ... (Below threshold)
astonerii:

Somehow, I seriously doubt that any other group of people, other than trained rescuers have had to cut any vacations short because of the earthquake. While you can find it a problem with public relations, the people who paid for the tickets months in advance are not going to be targeted singly and if these ships were to not continue the trip as planned would owe every person denied the trip a refund.

But hey, lets all attack anyone having an enjoyable time today, while in Haiti up to 200,000 people are dead. Screw Scott Brown, why the hell should they be having enjoyable rallies while they could be having freaking candle lit mourning ceremonies. Lets not forget about Martin Luther King Day, all those celebrations need to be tamped down to appropriately solemn events which should not be too hard since he was assassinated. Got a birthday between the day the earthquake hit and any time between now and the last bit of clean up is done, do not celebrate, mourn, and if you do celebrate we will shun you because you are uncaring, donate your presents to a Haitian orphan, its the only right thing to do.

"Imagine if some cruise shi... (Below threshold)
Paul:

"Imagine if some cruise ship company proposed to send a ship to New York in the weeks after 9/11. Do you really think that would have been a respectful, let alone supportive thing to do?"

New York is a port for many cruise lines and as far as I know, they didn't stop cruising to NYC; even if they had it would not have been out of some false sense of "respect".
Quite the contrary, I remember clearly in those terrible weeks after 9-11 a huge media blitz to get people to come out and spend money on Broadway shows and other frivolous activities so the city wouldn't suffer so much. Further more, I don't remember mass closing of restaurants or the mass cancellations of weddings and other happy events throughout New York state and beyond to accommodate your fake sense of outrage either.

"I personally do not think that this is the time to be transporting tourists to the island. They should be taking doctors, if anything."

If you can show me that Doctors are unable to reach the island as it stands you may have a point. Does Port Au Prince even have the facilities to dock modern mega liners?

I just saw on the news wher... (Below threshold)
uptown:

I just saw on the news where there are 124 legally adopted children in an orphanage in Haiti. Their American parents are desperate to get them, there is a plane in the Dominican Republic ready to take them, the only thing that is holding them back is a yes from the US state department. If you want to get mad over something worth while, why not that?

Paul,New ... (Below threshold)
ryan a:

Paul,

New York is a port for many cruise lines and as far as I know, they didn't stop cruising to NYC; even if they had it would not have been out of some false sense of "respect".

Look, this kind of tourism is bad enough as it is. The benefits are really only shared by a relative few, and the tourists themselves are kept well away from the poverty that isn't conducive to a nice vacation.

Touring Haiti right now, in my opinion, is kind of ridiculous and callous.

I understand the argument about not cutting off the economy, and it would be one thing if this kind of tourism really benefited the population as a whole.

I think that the cruise line is doing the right thing by offering donations etc. If you think that tourism makes sense, more power to you. It makes sense to give the leisure time a little break, IMO. Just an opinion.

The world does not need to stop by any means.

"Further more, I don't remember mass closing of restaurants or the mass cancellations of weddings and other happy events throughout New York state and beyond to accommodate your fake sense of outrage either."

I personally do not think it's right. And people who argue that this tourism HELPS, well, they're a little naive about who actually benefits from mega-tourism like this.

If I were a tourist I suppose I would want to give it a little time, out of respect for what many of these people have been through. That's just me.

"If you can show me that Doctors are unable to reach the island as it stands you may have a point. Does Port Au Prince even have the facilities to dock modern mega liners?"

Well, last I heard the airport were getting all backed up, and some organizations were calling for experienced doctors and surgeons:

http://standwithhaiti.org/haiti/news-entry/how-you-can-help-volunteer-and-donate-supplies/

But ya, you're right, what Haiti really needs is more tourists, so that they can get back to serving cocktails and selling cheap tourist handicrafts.

In my opinion tourism can wait, at least for a short time.

One more point for you Paul... (Below threshold)
ryan a:

One more point for you Paul,

Quite the contrary, I remember clearly in those terrible weeks after 9-11 a huge media blitz to get people to come out and spend money on Broadway shows and other frivolous activities so the city wouldn't suffer so much. Further more, I don't remember mass closing of restaurants or the mass cancellations of weddings and other happy events throughout New York state and beyond to accommodate your fake sense of outrage either.

It would be one thing if the Haitian people were the major stockholders in these sorts of tourism operations, but they are not. Sure, a couple hundred people are employed by the cruise line, but this is akin to the Maya people in Cancun who work as waiters and maids for the Marriott. Local people usually occupy pretty low-level jobs, and the revenues from large scale international tourism either goes to local elites or international tourism businesses.

Yes, some people get jobs from this, and the government gets some money for renting land to foreign corporations like Royal Caribbean. And yes, local people do sell some tourist goods at a market...though I highly doubt they are getting rich from any of it. But tourism is not exactly the magical development solution that many people like to pretend that it is.

Ryan, you make some interes... (Below threshold)
Paul:

Ryan, you make some interesting points. I am sure that we can both agree that this is a major disaster that needs to be addressed. I have been to this beach area in discussion and I can tell anyone who wants it used for some relief purpose that it is very small, very undeveloped and isolated from the rest of the island by mountains and no roads. If I remember correctly the ship itself couldn't even dock there. It had to drop anchor a half mile in the bay and ferry people by small boats. Again, I also do not know if these modern ships could dock at Port Au Prince if they wanted to. Cruise lines allowed thousands of refugees on board their ships in the past, only to have them totally trashed by the ungrateful tenants to the point of the ships having to be totally dry docked and gutted. Now all of this said, if there is a genuine need for the Haitians to have access to any of these things I think they should have it immediately.

We liberal trolls hate Carn... (Below threshold)
Victory is Mao's:

We liberal trolls hate Carnival because of their filthy profits. Burn them! BURN THEM ALL!

Peace.

"Ryan, you make so... (Below threshold)
ryan a:
"Ryan, you make some interesting points. I am sure that we can both agree that this is a major disaster that needs to be addressed."

Hey Paul, thanks for considering my comments. We definitely do agree that this needs to be addressed. I have a lot of respect for all of the people who are over there trying to help out--from the Red Cross people to the US military to all of the volunteer doctors & nurses, etc.

A note to all you defenders... (Below threshold)
Marc:

A note to all you defenders of Royal Caribbean... are you all frigging crazy?

Have none of you heard that the average income in Haiti is approx. 2 bucks US per day?

Do any of you defenders REALLY think the cruise line is paying anything more than that?

Hell they could quadruple the 2 bucks a day US...PLUS what... a couple hundred they MIGHT employ daily [probably less, most are part time] and it wouldn't mean DOG SQUAT.

NOTE to paul "I also do not know if these modern ships could dock at Port Au Prince if they wanted to."

you need to watch more or a better news channel, the port is trashed and unusable for any vessel larger than a row boat.

What many may NOT realize i... (Below threshold)
John:

What many may NOT realize is that RCCL leased the land for 50 years. The deal was sealed with "Baby Doc" weeks before his reign ended.

RCCL loaned $55M to the Haitian government to build the pier. The Haitian government has to re-pay the $55M to RCCL. Yes, you read this correctly:-) RCCL gets a loan on its books for $55M and the Haitians repay the loan back for building a pier that only RCCL may use for a period of 50 years.

RCCL only pays $6.00 per passenger to land in Labadee and that money goes straight back to repay the $55M loan.

I think that RCCL decided to keep docking in Labadee is that its new genesis class vessel "Oasis" (how fitting a name for a ship) has a 30' foot draft and Labadee is a deep-water port. In addition, if RCCL did NOT keep docking in Labadee, the Oasis would find it hard to squeeze into any port of call in the region hence, keep the pier open at Labadee.

Aronson who was the U.S. policy maker for the Caribbean islands landed a job with RCCL as a Director - go figure.

The protection afforded Labadee (as a port of call) is unprecendented considering the UNSTABLE government of Haiti.




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