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The Bringer of Death

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And now, Number 11: "BP Oil Platform Spill Disaster is CHENEY'S Fault"

I kid you not. It didn't take long, did it?

The First Post (UK): "Halliburton implicated in BP's Deepwater oil spill"

The Guardian: "Dick Cheney and the oil spill"

Salon.com: "Who's to blame for the oil spill? Dick Cheney"

A week ago, the Wall Street Journal published a fair analysis of the safety mechanisms aboard the Deepwater Horizon drilling rig, leading off the article with the fact that rig did not have a remote backup "acoustic switch" shutoff mechanism installed on the wellhead. And Halliburton Co., the biggest provider of oilfield services in the US, was responsible for cementing Deepwater Horizon's drilling hole, a process that involves pumping cement into the sheathing around the over-large drilling hole in order to seal the space between the hole and the wellhead pipe.

So, according to the loony left, Halliburton is solely responsible for the Deepwater Horizon blowout because 1) they are evil, and 2) a drilling platform off the coast of Australia that Halliburton also cemented experienced a blowout last August. What more proof do we need? Also, Dick Cheney's secret diabolical "energy task force" that met -- in secret!! -- during Chimpy McHitler's first Reich Regime term obviously decided to eliminate all of the offshore drilling platform safety features that they could get away with, just so his Big Oil schmoozing buddies could get bigger payday bonuses. Ah, yes ... it all makes perfect sense now.

__________________________

Two more related stories that should be getting loads of attention from every network and major newspaper, but that sadly do not fit the preferred narrative:

Washington Post: "U.S. exempted BP's Gulf of Mexico drilling from environmental impact study"

The Interior Department exempted BP's calamitous Gulf of Mexico drilling operation from a detailed environmental impact analysis last year, according to government documents, after three reviews of the area concluded that a massive oil spill was unlikely.

The decision by the department's Minerals Management Service (MMS) to give BP's lease at Deepwater Horizon a "categorical exclusion" from the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) on April 6, 2009 -- and BP's lobbying efforts just 11 days before the explosion to expand those exemptions -- show that neither federal regulators nor the company anticipated an accident of the scale of the one unfolding in the gulf.

The Politico: "Obama Biggest Recipient of BP Cash"

While the BP oil geyser pumps millions of gallons of petroleum into the Gulf of Mexico, President Barack Obama and members of Congress may have to answer for the millions in campaign contributions they've taken from the oil and gas giant over the years.

BP and its employees have given more than $3.5 million to federal candidates over the past 20 years, with the largest chunk of their money going to Obama, according to the Center for Responsive Politics ... During his time in the Senate and while running for president, Obama received a total of $77,051 from the oil giant and is the top recipient of BP PAC and individual money over the past 20 years, according to financial disclosure records.

This shouldn't surprise anyone who has been paying attention for the last two and a half years.


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Comments (44)

Barry lied, flipper died.</... (Below threshold)
914:

Barry lied, flipper died.

WOW! Cheney's not even in ... (Below threshold)
GarandFan:

WOW! Cheney's not even in the government any longer and HE'S STILL SOOOOOOOOOO POWERFUL!

Kinda makes that Barry guy look like a wuss!

As for the MFM, you know what you can do with Barack's Ass Kissers.

"This shouldn't surprise an... (Below threshold)
jaime:

"This shouldn't surprise anyone who has been paying attention for the last two and a half years."

2 1/2 years? Obama became president January 20 2009.

jaime, Obama's sha... (Below threshold)

jaime,

Obama's shady links to all manner of powerful people and organizations first started to be reported at the end of 2007, when he first emerged as a serious Presidential candidate.

Probably the biggest irony ... (Below threshold)
Tsar Nicholas II:

Probably the biggest irony with this entry is that deranged liberals on the Internet won't be able to comprehend the irony

Yeah but the failure in chi... (Below threshold)
914:

Yeah but the failure in chief was running for office all the while he was not "present" in the senate for at least a year before..

So the Reds have a ridiculo... (Below threshold)
Jay Guevara:

So the Reds have a ridiculously tenuous tie-in to Cheney. Now they need one to Palin... must think... must think...ah - got it! Her name spelled backward means "oil" in Kirghiz. Can't get much plainer than that.

Now need a tie-in to Bush...ah, hell, they don't need one to Bush. He's to blame for everything.

So they've got Cheney, Palin, and Bush. A liberal trifecta!

Thanks for the heads up on ... (Below threshold)
Myronhalo:

Thanks for the heads up on what the leftists are saying about Cheney.

Don´t they have a place for this kind of people? Or maybe they escaped?

Their logic is that since I owned a car 10 years ago, I am still personally responsible for any accidents the new owners may ever have.

The blame game is alive and well in the human race.

hey ya'llI know this... (Below threshold)
rain of lead:

hey ya'll
I know this is ot but I need to vent a little
I live here in middle tennessee and we just had a little flood over the weekend, only killed 19 people, 10 just in nashville
a local writer said how I feel better than I could

Allow me a moment to step away from the usual voice of this website.

What I am about to write has absolutely nothing to do with hockey.

If you live outside of Nashville, you may not be aware, but our city was hit by a 500-year flood over the last few days. The national news coverage gave us 15 minutes, but went back to focusing on a failed car bomb and an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. While both are clearly important stories, was that any reason to ignore our story? It may not be as terror-sexy as a failed car bomb or as eco-sexy as an oil spill, but that's no reason to be ignored.

The Cumberland River crested at its highest level in over 80 years. Nashville had its highest rainfall totals since records began. People drowned. Billions of dollars in damage occurred. It is the single largest disaster to hit Middle Tennessee since the Civil War. And yet...no one knows about it.

Does it really matter? Eventually, it will...as I mentioned, there are billions of dollars in damage. It seems bizarre that no one seems to be aware that we just experienced what is quite possibly the costliest non-hurricane disaster in American history. The funds to rebuild will have to come from somewhere, which is why people need to know. It's hard to believe that we will receive much relief if there isn't a perception that we need it.

But let's look at the other side of the coin for a moment. A large part of the reason that we are being ignored is because of who we are. Think about that for just a second. Did you hear about looting? Did you hear about crime sprees? No...you didn't. You heard about people pulling their neighbors off of rooftops. You saw a group of people trying to move two horses to higher ground. No...we didn't loot. Our biggest warning was, "Don't play in the floodwater." When you think about it...that speaks a lot for our city. A large portion of why we were being ignored was that we weren't doing anything to draw attention to ourselves. We were handling it on our own.

Some will be quick to find fault in the way rescue operations were handled, but the fact of the matter is that the catastrophe could not have been prevented and it is simply ignorant beyond all reason to suggest otherwise. It is a flood. It was caused by rain. You can try to find a face to stick this tragedy to, but you'll be wrong.

Parts of Nashville that could never even conceivably be underwater were underwater. Some of them still are. Opry Mills and the Opryland Hotel are, for all intents and purposes, destroyed. People died sitting in standstill traffic on the Interstate. We saw boats going down West End. And, of course, we all saw the surreal image of the portable building from Lighthouse Christian floating into traffic and being destroyed when cars were knocked into it. I'm still having trouble comprehending all of it.

And yet...life will go on. We'll go back to work, to school, to our lives...and we'll carry on. In a little over a month, I'll be on this website talking about the draft. In October, we'll be discussing the new Predators' season with nary a thought of these past few days. But in a way, they changed everyone in this town. We now know that that it can happen to us...but also know that we can handle it.

Because we are Nashville.

thanks
rol

oopssorry bout that ... (Below threshold)
rain of lead:

oops
sorry bout that double post

and Lee "Bush had 3 days" ... (Below threshold)
retired military:

and Lee "Bush had 3 days" Ward in 3...2...1..

Pulling the Cheney card wil... (Below threshold)
Roy:

Pulling the Cheney card will backfire. A majority of Americans pine for the good old days when Cheney was around and terrorists hid in caves, instead of parking in Time Square.

rol:It's simple. ... (Below threshold)
GarandFan:

rol:

It's simple. Barry hates white people. Look what happened with the floods last spring.

BryanD, your reputation for... (Below threshold)
Jay Guevara:

BryanD, your reputation for weapons-grade stupidity is intact.

It should be pointed out th... (Below threshold)
Faith+1:

It should be pointed out that George Soros owns more shares of Haliburton than Cheny ever did and stands more to gain from them cutting corners than Dick.

He spent about $62M buying around 2 millions shares of Haliburton. Since George is a deep pockets investor of President O the money trail leads back to the White House....not Cheney.

Oh look BryanD and Lee Ward... (Below threshold)
retired military:

Oh look BryanD and Lee Ward crawled out from under their rocks in the same week.

Must be a lousy week for Obama.

"Halliburton is well-known ... (Below threshold)
HughS:

"Halliburton is well-known for shoddy work on the lower end projects"

Which is precisely why they are chosen to work on some of the most sophisticated and complex energy exploration projects in the world: because the companies that procure their services are interested only in using them so that they screw up their multi billion dollar projects. It makes perfect sense, bryanD.

"Halliburton is well-known ... (Below threshold)
Jay Guevara:

"Halliburton is well-known for shoddy work on the lower end projects"

Well-known in your bathhouse, presumably. They just need some of that Obama executive experience to make the company run like a watch.

This shouldn't surprise ... (Below threshold)
Steve Crickmore:

This shouldn't surprise anyone who has been paying attention for the last two and a half years
about BP's lobbying efforts and campaign contributions to Obama and the Dems.

Well, I seem to recall for the last two and half years, the GOP and their more partisan blogs were falling over themselves to see who could repeat the refrain "DRILL BABY DRILL," and now! Here is a breathless recent example, praising Obama of all people, for taking a page out of the GOP playbook; from Wizbang´s sister blog, Townhall. MARCH 31, 2010, Obama Proposes Significant Expansion Of Offshore Drilling
Posted by: Jillian Bandes


Some thought he would open up a portion of the offshore drilling areas desired by United States oil companies, but no one thought he would open this much..

That's 167 million acres in total across the eastern seaboard, according to the New York Times.

Add that to 130 acres in Alaska, and you've got yourself some serious oil production. Drill, baby, drill!

UPDATE: Parts of Florida are also included in the areas Obama wants to drill along the eastern seaboard. Drudge points out that this is a conflict with what he expressed during his campaign. I don't care what he promised during his campaign. Drill, baby, drill!

Now after the accident, wizbang´s spin is not that big oil, without the remote control acoustic switches, were reckless in drilling so deep, flouting those tiresome federal environmental regulations, which they and the wingnuts despise.

NO THEY ARE UPSET that Obama didn´t react quickly enough, and accepted BP´s initial statements that the oil loss was minimal, and that they were in control of the situation. I agree that the administration should have immediately been sceptical of BP´s claims; even if it meant there would have been a howl of dissent from the right wing, but Obama is concilator by nature, and trusts multinationals far too much for my liking, who have vested short term interests,-he is certainly not a socialist.

But there is relatively little the Feds can do to mitigate such a disaster once the spill happens, which is all the more reason why it should not be allowed to happen in the first place, through renewed tougher US regulations and enforcement.

Crickmore is flatly wrong a... (Below threshold)
Jim Addison:

Crickmore is flatly wrong about ANY acreage "opened up for drilling" by Obama. The correct total is ZERO - he authorized no new drilling at all. Period. NONE. "open to study for potential drilling if whoever is Prez when the reports come in wants to" is not "open to drilling." In fact, the NET immediate result of his order is to restrict more acreage, not increase it.

Obama violated the FEDERAL protocols established during the Clinton Administration - although I understand why he would disregard the law and take BP's word considering how much money they donated to his campaign, if you are saying he's the sort of honest fellow who, once bought, stays bought - by not implementing them right away. Of course his record is to throw anyone under the bus, as he did BP (since), Jeremiah Wright, his own dying Grandmother, etc.


This bad accident has been turned into a disaster by Obama's incompetence.

Steve Crickmore"ut... (Below threshold)
retired military:

Steve Crickmore

"ut there is relatively little the Feds can do to mitigate such a disaster once the spill happens, which is all the more reason why it should not be allowed to happen in the first place through renewed tougher US regulations and enforcement.
"

Oh you mean like

Hunger
Poverty
War
Famine
Disease


It would be about as effective.

And is the US going to regulate other countries drilling in their waters like say Mexico? Cuba? Yep that will be effective since they have about the same chance of controlling any spills as we do.

And what about the waivers that BP got from Obama (whom they contributed to. Not a coincidence there is there)

I got it crickmoore. How about no more oil. Period. None. We can all go back to the stone age just to make you happy. We can eat all our food cold, and migrate south in the winter (those of us left alive) to try to stay warm.

Tell me Stevie is this you in drag?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UQeIjt2pxjc&feature=player_embedded#!

Oh BTW, Lee Ward, BryanD ... (Below threshold)
retired military:

Oh BTW, Lee Ward, BryanD and then Crickmoore.

Ever notice when Obama is looking bad the 3 stooges come out to try to spin events to make Obama look better (thus providing proof that almost any one can make Obama look better because it is hard as hell to make him look worse than what he is).

Chuck Norris looks under hi... (Below threshold)
Jeff Blogworthy:

Chuck Norris looks under his bed for Dick Cheney.

But there is relat... (Below threshold)
hcddbz:
But there is relatively little the Feds can do to mitigate such a disaster once the spill happens, which is all the more reason why it should not be allowed to happen in the first place, through renewed tougher US regulations and enforcement.
True True Except: Follow the plan. BP wants to drill 1. purchase Fire booms to contain potential spills. 2. Create rapid response team to handle spills. 3. Examine current methods and look at features for Deepwater drilling. Example what BP just did for this well was to apply a method they used for Shallow water operations after Katerina. 4.Most things that happen in the oil is an iterative engineering process. 5. Drill onshore 6. Still invest in looking at how to handle off shore deep water spills as other countries will still do it. When that happens the oil may flow towards US shores so it in our national interest to protect it.

Also DRILL BABY DRILL!
1-60K barrels a day from one well?
Someone will operate to get that. Better the US than China, or would rather have the folks who cannot make toothpaste, dog food, or dry wall build oil platforms?

Dick (Cheney) of The... (Below threshold)


Dick (Cheney) of The Road


oil land for lease or rent
Haliburton's monies spent
no more Veep perks to get
Ain't got no big secrets
Ah, but eight years mideast war gloom
left a Capitol without no room
for a man that's mean, and more mean
Dick of the Road.

No Pentagon... or airforce planes.
No more political games
I wear brand new suits and shoes
ain't got no congress blues
Cuban stogies I keep around
for my friends that didn't let me down
I'm a man of means, and more means
Dick of the Road

I know every CEO, and all of their games
helping their business, all for GOP gain,
And every contributor in every town
And every friend that I ain't shot
When I come around.

I sing
oil land for lease or rent
Haliburton's monies spent
no more Veep perks to get
No C - I - A secrets
Ah, but eight years mideast war gloom
left a Capitol without no room
for a man that's mean, and more mean
Dick of the Road.

(with apologies to Roger Miller)


Just once I'd like for our ... (Below threshold)
Big Mo:

Just once I'd like for our government and businesses to come out and say, "You know what? We effed up. We made a mess. We apologize, and we're doing our best to fix it."

Like Dominoes Pizza did. Before this year, I refused to eat their flavorless cardboard. But then they publicly ate a huge helping of crow, changed their product, and now their sales at stores are up considerably.

And oh, yeah, Dick Cheney m... (Below threshold)
Big Mo:

And oh, yeah, Dick Cheney makes Chuck Norris look like a piker. After all, Cheney shot a friend in the face and they remain good friends.

These lefty harpies will sh... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

These lefty harpies will shout Haliburton!Cheney! until they're blue in the face because it makes them feel good. They'll completely ignore that Haliburton's cement job may or may not be only one error in a string of failures (the jury is still out). Telling them this won't stop their righteous indignation in any form. Anyone who is truly interested in finding out exactly what happened will pay attention and take it all into consideration.

What bothers me is that, like the Katrina disaster, the designated first-responders were an epic fail. And in both cases it was government.

Eveyrbody knows the bringer... (Below threshold)
James H:

Eveyrbody knows the bringer of death is Richard Rahl.

Retired military, <i... (Below threshold)
Steve Crickmore:

Retired military,
I got it crickmoore. How about no more oil. Period. None. We can all go back to the stone age just to make you happy

I prefer to think the present oil age is a metaphor for the stone age that we are in, but which we will gradually leave behind us, with with the aid of government encouragement and financial incentives, that will develop alternavtive and cleaner energy supplies with less Co2 emissions.

"The Stone Age did not end for lack of stone, and the Oil Age will end long before the world runs out of oil." Sheikh Yamani, Saudi Oil Minister, 1962-1986.


Great quote in a peak oil report except for one tiny point -- we still use a lot of stones. In fact, given that we have 6.7 billion people on the planet, I'm quite certain that we use a lot more stones than we did in the Stone Age. I'm almost as certain that, as the DB (Deutshe Bank) report says, we will be using a lot less total oil in a few decades...


The reason for the (expected) price jump of oil (in the next decade) is that we're running out of the easy supply. That's certainly the view of all the peakers I know. And it's the view of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and its chief economist, Dr. Fatih Birol (see World's top energy economist warns peak oil threatens recovery, urges immediate action: "We have to leave oil before oil leaves us.")

Great reference, James. Ha... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

Great reference, James. Have you read The Law of Nines? The Rahls live on....

I prefer to think the pr... (Below threshold)
JLawson:

I prefer to think the present oil age is a metaphor for the stone age that we are in, but which we will gradually leave behind us, with with the aid of government encouragement and financial incentives, that will develop alternavtive and cleaner energy supplies with less Co2 emissions.

Halfway agree with you there - up to the point on 'government aid'.

Wood burning engines bootstrapped the industrial revolution - and when wood started getting scarce coal was used, with all the attendant problems IT had. Coal helped bootstrap the 'electrical' age we're in now - and the search for better ways to produce electricity got us to fission reactors.

Fission for electricity was, I think, supposed to bootstrap us into fusion - and at that point we'd have 'won' the game. Maybe there's something after fusion (zero-point energy?) but nuclear power wasn't even a glimmer when they were shoving firewood into locomotive fireboxes.

It was the private sector that initiated the shifts from wood to coal, and coal to natural gas and electricity where possible - not government. And frankly, I'm doubtful that the folks inside the Beltway could wire an electical outlet correctly, much less decide what direction our energy policy should go. I mean, ethanol just worked out so WELL...

Steve,Ah PEAK OIL.... (Below threshold)
hcddbz:

Steve,

Ah PEAK OIL.
Peak oil was to occur in the 70. However we keep finding new oil reservoirs.

It similar to old utopian ideas that the world would run out of food because of population explosion. Excepted it did not happen even though it been predicted ever 50 years for the last 300.

The world is not static you have to look at things in dynamic environment.

Anyone remember when 150USD oil would be the new norm and could never go down?

The oil exploration and yield are not fixed cost. As technology evolves , fabrication method improve expensive retrieval method become less expensive and yield improves.

At the same time no hydrocarbon companies can find viable other forms of energy.

"Oh BTW, Lee Ward, BryanD a... (Below threshold)
bryanD:

"Oh BTW, Lee Ward, BryanD and then Crickmoore.
Ever notice when Obama is looking bad the 3 stooges come out to try to spin events to make Obama look better."---retired

N'ah. I'll visit here when sales are good and I'm happy. On my atelier days, I might comment here between cigarettes when the opinions gets too editorially homo and the male disco blares too brightly.
For example, if Lee is already here (or Steve, etc.) I tend to keep my peace and move on to sites where people have been places and done things. It seems that some posters here are on bed rest, or perhaps hidden deeply inside an alter ego. Out of place/ out of time. (No? then where's any distilled Philosophy? and parroting the NRO girly-men doesn't count.)
Jay Tea's skinhead adventure-invention was a poignant break-out attempt at relavency among Hu-Mans from Earth planet. It smelled funny, though.
I'm sure he regrets the fib.

Great reference, J... (Below threshold)
James H:
Great reference, James. Have you read The Law of Nines? The Rahls live on....

Haven't read Nines. I actually gave up on Sword of Truth about four or so books in. Terry Goodkind let his philosophy overtake his narrative, IMO. A good writer lets his characters demonstrate his philosophy's superiority through their actions, rather than having them lecture the reader.

"A good writer lets his ... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

"A good writer lets his characters demonstrate his philosophy's superiority through their actions, ..."

I thought that's pretty much exactly what he did.

I liked Goodkind's books up... (Below threshold)
JLawson:

I liked Goodkind's books up till about 'Faith of the Fallen' - and though I liked that one also the heavy-handed allegory made me think "THERE is a good finish." Haven't picked up one since. He's up to what, 11. 12 in the series now?

If you want another interminable read, try 'The Wheel of Time' series by Robert Jordan. That one I gave up after the 6th book, and it's about 13, 14 books long.

Steve Chirpsmoore"Th... (Below threshold)
retired military:

Steve Chirpsmoore
"The reason for the (expected) price jump of oil (in the next decade) is that we're running out of the easy supply"

Gee how about drilling in areas that currently off limits in order to maximize supply?

How about building nuclear power plants (lots of them) to cut demand?

How about cutting the types of blends of gas down to 2 or 3 instead of the 20+ that the oil companies have to produce now?

The answer is less regulation and not more. The answer is to drill more not less. The answer is nuclear power (proven cheap, clean, and efficient) vs buying oil from our enemies.

Inshort the 3 most common sense answers are the 3 worst answers for liberals like Chirpsmoore.


...[E]nvironmental... (Below threshold)
...[E]nvironmental lawyer, Mike Papantonio, said on the Schultz show... that it was Cheney's energy task force... that decided that the switches, which cost $500,000, were too much a burden on the industry...

In the interests of disclosure I will note that I haven't heard the phrase "acoustic switch" until this weekend, so I don't really know. And obviously the fact that the US isn't alone in not requiring this switch indicates that there are legitimate questions about cost v. efficacy. So maybe it's just one of those things.
Guardian

Question 1: How is it that this lawyer "knows" what was said in this meeting? or is he just pulling stuff out of his ass?

Question 2: How is it that Halliburton is in trouble for not installing a safety device that isn't even required (except by 2 random countries)?

note: these questions are rhetorical in case you seriously wanted to try and answer them.

I thought that's p... (Below threshold)
James H:
I thought that's pretty much exactly what he did.

Not quite. In Wizard's First Rule, you had an imprisoned peasant delivering minor speeches about earning gold vs. sharing it while the nobles laughed at him. It didn't bother me in the book, but as an audiobook, the dialogue stood out and might as well have had "Author Tract" stamped on it.

I really enjoyed Richard using free-flowing, unearned gold to subvert everybody in Stone of Tears.

But by the time Blood of the Fold showed up, Richard's speechifying became incredibly didactic. And an Epinions review accurately describes Faith of the Fallen as "Richard Takes On Comunism."

Goodkind allowed his philosophizing to overshadow the story, a flaw that harmed the series' overall quality.

Jlaw:

As far as epic fantasy, George RR Martin has mostly spoiled me. A Song of Ice and Fire is so incredibly intricate that nearly everything else feels like trash.

Jeebus. Blood of the Fold ... (Below threshold)
SCSIwuzzy:

Jeebus. Blood of the Fold was like Ayn Rand. But even harder to read. I kept hoping that some random person would walk up to Cypher/Rahl and just slap him. If I ever meet Goodkind again (I did years ago right after WFR when the question was "Is he the next Jordan, or a one hit wonder) I may still slap him for that book. And the general silliness of the EEEvil Dreamwalker BS. Clearly a series that didn't have a proper plot-outline when he started out...

SCSI:Also, the Mor... (Below threshold)
James H:

SCSI:

Also, the Mord-Sith told me a bit more about Goodkind's fantasy life than I really wanted to know.

I found Ayn Rand unreadable... (Below threshold)
James H:

I found Ayn Rand unreadable because her books are moral/philosophical tracts first and stories second. Much like some Sword of Truth books.

I'm really getting tired of... (Below threshold)

I'm really getting tired of my name being invoked when you're not actually talking about ME.




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