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Feeding The Fire

Sorry about the silence yesterday; I spent most of the day dealing with Snowmageddon IV, but mainly trying to poke holes in this article. And everywhere I looked, instead of debunking it, I kept finding more evidence backing it.

Now, I'm not calling this a "scheme" or "plot" or "plan," because I don't know that this is deliberate. Indeed, I find myself thinking (and hoping) that it isn't. But so much is going on right now, we need to take it on and head it off -- if it isn't too late.

One of my strengths as a blogger is in spotting patterns and parallels. They're not always connected, but stringing together themes is something I think I do well. And right now, there's one scary common thread tying together some very disturbing events.

In Tunisia, riots led to the downfall of the government there. Riots largely motivated by skyrocketing costs of food.

In Egypt, there are riots going on as well. Partly inspired by Tunisia, partly fueled by decades of resentment of Hosni Mubarak and his regime, and partly fueled by rising costs of food.

There are also anti-government riots going on in Yemen, again partly fueled by rising costs of food.

In the United States, inflation -- as reported by the federal government -- is very low. But the official government metric includes the housing market -- which is crashing -- and does not cover the costs of food and energy, which are rising.

Part of the reason the costs of food in the United States is going up is that we are using more and more food as fuel -- converting corn into ethanol for fuel. This has a few problems -- it's not only very inefficient (it's only economically feasible because the government subsidizes it heavily), but it can inflict severe damage on engines that burn it. We are literally sending food up in smoke.

When the United States burns food for fuel, there is less to sell to Americans -- so the cost of food goes up.

When the United States burns food for fuel, there is less for us to export to other nations, either for sale or to give away -- so the cost of food goes up there, too.

The Obama administration is pushing "green" jobs and renewable energy -- which is, in and of itself, more expensive than less environmentally friendly but more mature sources like coal, oil, and the like. They have made the conscious choice that absolute expense is less important than environmental impact. Which drives up the overall cost of energy, which in turn drives up the overall cost of food.

As an adjunct to this, they are also doing a great deal to discourage these mature energy sources -- shutting down a coal mine, blocking oil exploration and exploitation off our shores, continuing the blocking of using ANWR and other energy fields on shore. Which drives up the cost of energy, which in turn drives up the overall cost of food. Hell, Obama is on record as repeatedly stating that his plans will "necessarily" increase the price of energy.

Back to Egypt. As noted, Egypt is in turmoil right now.  And Egypt is where the Suez Canal is located. The Suez Canal, so important to world commerce that in the 1950s, when Nasser nationalized it, England, France, and Israel invaded Egypt to take control of the Canal. The Canal is absolutely critical to world commerce -- a tremendous amount of the world's oil passes through it, as well as food and other consumer goods. Should the Canal be closed -- or even disrupted -- the prices of most everything will go up, especially food and energy.

Another key passage for oil is the Strait of Hormuz, which connects the Persian Gulf with the Indian Ocean. 20% of the world's oil passes through the Strait -- and the Strait is bounded to the north with Iran's southern coast. Closing -- or even impairing -- traffic through the Strait has always been Iran's biggest threat. Should the Strait be disrupted, the price of energy will be driven up -- which will drive up the costs of everything else, including food.

One of the greatest driving factors in economic, technological, social, and every other form of development and advancement is cheap energy. Conversely, increasing the price of energy -- and making it overall less accessible -- will retard or even stop those advances. Couple that with the current economic slump we're all suffering, and the consequences could be nothing short of catastrophic.

We desperately need to turn this around. The rising costs of food and energy are wreaking havoc around the world -- and a large portion of the cause for those hikes are deliberate and political. We can turn that around in very short order -- if we can find the political will.

If we don't, then we can expect even more Tunisias, more Egypts, more Yemens around the world. We can expect higher costs of fuel, energy, and food at home, and all the consequent harm and havoc that that entails.

If anyone can look at all this and not be incredibly nervous, then they are an idiot.

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Comments (56)

And Michelle obama said, "L... (Below threshold)
jim m:

And Michelle obama said, "Let them eat biodiesel!"

When it all crashes, the pl... (Below threshold)
epador:

When it all crashes, the places with abundant water NOT imported, good growing seasons and established power generation with nuclear or local coal will flourish. Plan ahead.

I understand what you're sa... (Below threshold)
Pile of Pooh:

I understand what you're saying, but the connection to us (meaning the United States) is a bit tenuous. Shortages of food and energy are the norm for the Third World, (for my purposes, that is everything outside of North America, Western Europe, South Korea and Japan). So is despotism, for that matter.

I've traveled the planet pretty extensively, and not just in the tourist areas. A lot of that traveling was done as a Marine infantryman. I've seen the backwaters of the Pacific and Indian Rim areas, Eastern Europe and the Middle East. Most of the population of the planet exists (and always has) on the borders of subsistence, in many cases due to endemic despotism. It is their "normal."

In our present case, we're dealing with a separate but superficially related issue: political simpletons. It's not a matter of can't, it's a matter of having the luxury (for now) to say "don't wanna." The green movement is mostly full of people who barely scraped by in 9th grade bonehead science. The dangerous part is that there are plenty of self-serving politicians who are more than willing to exploit them as a path to personal power.

You're right in that we can turn it around quickly here in the States; all we need is a strong leader in office, instead of the parade of "it's my turn," plain-oatmeal politicians the GOP and Donks keep shoving up at primary time. This has happened before: 1980. It can (and probably will) happen again.

As for the rest of the world... Well, I've seen a lot of it first-hand. Let's just say I'm not exactly a globalist and leave it at that.

I'm ready and eager for the... (Below threshold)

I'm ready and eager for the Suez Canal to close as Islamic gangs go to war against each other. In the United States, we would go through a year of turmoil as we switched over to coal and natural gas, and expedited the construction of new nuclear power plants. Wyoming is the Saudi Arabia of natural gas and new reserves are being found all the time. Gasoline power autos are easily converted to natural gas. We just haven't done it as a nation because it isn't worth the bother. Yet.

After that, we don't need to be friendly with the Saudis. We won't need their oil or their problems. We can let them go back to living like barbarians who knife each other in marketplaces and sell their women like cattle. (Oh, wait, they already do.)

So bring it on.

Can we haz riets her tu?</p... (Below threshold)
Gmac:

Can we haz riets her tu?

If 0.3% of the population is mad at the (P)resident and his cost of living escalation policies will he be driven from office?

If they want him to go away will a gathering of one million peaceful protesters descending on Washington be able to make him leave?

If they riot and throw stuff will it be broadcast by the LSM and correctly identified as citizens protesting the extremist policies of this regime?

After all, he DID tell the head of state there to get on a fast boat to anywhere ASAP, like "yesterday" for the very same reasons...

Actually this is one of tho... (Below threshold)
WildWillie:

Actually this is one of those rare times when I think thoughtful restraint is needed from out leaders and they are actually doing okay with the problem. There is definitely a lot of who, what, when, why that is going on to see exactly who is orchestrating and/or taking advantage of the situation and using it for a grab. Egypts military is trained by us as is most their equipment and supply them money to maintain such so at least we have that.

Yemen is not a surprise to me. That is a hot bed of Islamic fundamentalism and they are just looking for a reason to go full out terror state.

JT, you are right on though, this is a perplexing problem and there is a thread between them all. Finding out for sure what the thread is will reveal the motivation. ww

Gee, I'm not nervous, since... (Below threshold)
Don L:

Gee, I'm not nervous, since we get a lot of our energy from our friends in Venenzuela and Mexico where social stabilty is the norm.

You are right on target with this -now if you can only convince the half of the nation that votes for windmill driven skateboards and free fuel from the nice government, we can make some headway.

And yet Barack continues to... (Below threshold)
Les Nessman:

And yet Barack continues to actively harm energy production (unless you're one of his cronies):

"Obama issues global warming rules in January, gives GE an exemption in February"

Read more at the Washington Examiner: http://washingtonexaminer.com/blogs/beltway-confidential/2011/02/obama-issues-global-warming-rules-january-gives-ge-exemption-febr#ixzz1CuRwiWIF

I posted this in another comment thread, but maybe it fits here even better.

Can anyone truly explain wh... (Below threshold)
Big Mo:

Can anyone truly explain what a "green job" is? Being serious here. What the heck is it?

Well here in "forward looki... (Below threshold)
GarandFan:

Well here in "forward looking" Kalifornia, the idiots passed a bond measure for $9.5 BILLION to build our super fast "bullet train" from San Diego to San Francisco. Gonna create 400,000 construction jobs. We're going "green" baby. By 2020 fully 1/3 of all electricity generated with be from "renewable" sources. And all that "clean" air is going to stay right here! Of course the 'train' won't be "built" here - all that nasty heavy industry stuff will be done someplace else - and those folks can wallow in their "dirty" air.

This state is sooooooooooooo screwed!

The Egyptian people’s right... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

The Egyptian people’s right to political self-determination supersedes your right to pay less than two dollars for a loaf of bread or five dollars for a gallon of gasoline.

For people who claim to despise tyranny so strongly, the response from the American right-wing to the events in Egypt has been oddly tepid, to downright insane (Frank Gaffney, anyone?)

This should be an occasion of unbridled joy and celebration of the human spirit, rather than cause for hand-wringing about the future price of commodities or Israel's ability to continue doing whatever the hell it wants.

"The Egyptian people’s righ... (Below threshold)
GarandFan:

"The Egyptian people’s right to political self-determination supersedes your right to pay less than two dollars for a loaf of bread or five dollars for a gallon of gasoline."

Translation: "Oh look! A rabbit!"

No, seriously: whatever hap... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

No, seriously: whatever happens in Egypt, everybody everywhere who purports to care about "freedom" and "democracy" should be celebrating the end of a dictatorship, rather than worrying about the economic impact on themselves.

But then ever since the American right cast its support behind Pinochet and Saddam Hussein, it's been perfectly clear that the conservative movement in the United States cares not a whit for freedom and democracy, so this comes as no real surprise.

"The Egyptian people’s righ... (Below threshold)
914:

"The Egyptian people’s right to political self-determination supersedes your right to pay less than two dollars for a loaf of bread or five dollars for a gallon of gasoline."

No, it does not and SCREW YOU!!

Hyper, that's an astonishin... (Below threshold)

Hyper, that's an astonishing statement. "Astonishing," as it bears almost no resemblance to what I wrote.

Did what I wrote so completely baffle you that you had to latch on to one or two key words, and spew out the standard partisan talking points you've picked up and managed to cram into your tiny little mind?

J.

What are you? Another schol... (Below threshold)
914:

What are you? Another scholar to tell Me My rights and or priorities?

Barry's butchering of the constitution is bad enough. Now we get some Canadian troll dictating our rights on a blog of all things. Get a job and mind Your own business.

"If we don't, then we ca... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

"If we don't, then we can expect even more Tunisias, more Egypts, more Yemens around the world. We can expect higher costs of fuel, energy, and food at home, and all the consequent harm and havoc that that entails."

Someone who values freedom and hates dictatorships should be hoping (or praying, if that's their thing) for more Tunisias, more Egypts, and more Yemens, rather than worrying about what might happen to the price of petroleum. As for "partisan talking points", I guess it's now fine and dandy for whatever type of person you consider yourself to be to brand a preference for freedom over economic self-interest as a decidedly "liberal" position. Man, that's a really stupid point of view.

No, seriously: whatever ... (Below threshold)

No, seriously: whatever happens in Egypt, everybody everywhere who purports to care about "freedom" and "democracy" should be celebrating the end of a dictatorship, rather than worrying about the economic impact on themselves.

Because, of course, Mubarak is the absolute worst possible ruler Egypt could have. ANYTHING would be an improvement.

Christ, hyper, you're an ignorant, malignant asshole.

And I'm not surprised that you have absolutely nothing to say on the actual thesis of my piece. You're just not intellectually capable of doing anything beyond parroting your talking points.

J.

Current death toll in Egypt... (Below threshold)

Current death toll in Egypt's estimated to be around 300, hyper... that enough for you yet?

J.

Hyper won't be happy until ... (Below threshold)
914:

Hyper won't be happy until He/She can blame this on Bush or Palin.

No more wasting time on this idiot.

Hyper - "No, seriously: ... (Below threshold)
JLawson:

Hyper - "No, seriously: whatever happens in Egypt, everybody everywhere who purports to care about "freedom" and "democracy" should be celebrating the end of a dictatorship, rather than worrying about the economic impact on themselves."

Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. Let's see - the Shah was a rotten bastard, good thing he was kicked out and Khomeini took over. That lead Iran to a 'free and prosperous' time where they really got along well with their neighbors, right? So Khomeini was a VAST improvement over the Shah.

Personally, I'm glad to see a dictatorship founder. But let's face it - what happens there WILL have effects worldwide. If there's little to no disruption of the oil supply, then prices will wobble a bit but not surge. If there's a lot of destruction or disruption, then the high oil prices of three years back may well return, giving the slowly recovering gobal economy a sharp kick in the nuts.

I'd also be a bit concerned about 'democratic' elections in that neck of the woods. "One man, one vote, one time" is a likely outcome, especially if whoever gets into office is supported by the more radical religious elements in the area.

It'll be interesting to see what happens.

It's a revolution. What was... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

It's a revolution. What was the death toll in the War of Independence? Or the French Revolution? Every loss of human life is regrettable. However, when people die for a cause they believe in, I thought that was meant to be respected.

Jay Tea, "your" "thesis" is a half-baked attempt at re-framing the events in Egypt in a way that is totally irrelevant to the overall importance of what is going on in the region. Granting the Egyptian people the right to democratic self-determination, and getting rid of a fascist asshole in the process, is a good thing, full-stop, and the impact on the price of food and oil has nothing to do with the moral calculus. If he is replaced by a religious fascist, that's a pity and a wasted opportunity, but not an opportunity that anyone in the world should deny the Egyptian people.

hyper, you're willfully ign... (Below threshold)

hyper, you're willfully ignoring the big picture here -- that Obama's policies are literally fueling economic ruin and social chaos around the world, leading to people being killed. You're hanging up on your one bullshit talking point because you don't want to see that big picture.

And if you want to keep harping on your bullshit talking point, I have options to deal with that, too.

J.

JT, the asshole in question... (Below threshold)
WildWillie:

JT, the asshole in question actually thinks the total sum of demonstrators is reflective of all the citizens. Only a fool would believe that. Oh! Nevermind. ww

WildWillie, siding with the... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

WildWillie, siding with the authoritarian fascists? Good stuff buddy, love the consistency.

If Obama's policies lead in some roundabout way to the undoing of authoritarian regimes, Jay Tea, then good for Obama's policies! More Egypts, Tunisias, and Yemens, please. Freedom and democracy are good. And that's not a "talking point"--it's an objective moral truth.

Stop being a Glenn Beck wannabe and step away from the chalkboard. Take a few moments to appreciate what people in the Middle East are doing right now: they are doing what everyone in the United States government hoped would happen in Iran by now. To someone with principles, it's an unqualifiedly good thing, no matter what the outcome.

To further JLawson's commen... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

To further JLawson's comment, isn't the whole region so much better off with the Palestinians' democratic elections too?

And how wonderful it must be for everyone in the region with Lebanon's change in government.

When "self-determination" has a detrimental effect on everyone surrounding those who so desire it, and it impacts even those not so near, it becomes everyone's business.

Has there been a situation of spontaneous unrest in the mid-east yet that Islamists didn't tke advantage of and move in to take over?

Considering the recent poll showing that 75% of Egyptians favor draconic Sharia Law punishments and considering the Muslim Brotherhood's vow to destroy Israel how can you not understand why Hyperbolist wouldn't be all warm and fuzzy about their self-determination.

hyper, if I gotta explain t... (Below threshold)

hyper, if I gotta explain to you that "global economic chaos and food riots that leave hundreds, maybe thousands dead" is a shitty tradeoff for "we might or might not get rid of a few dictators who are way down on the list of global threats and quite possibly be replaced with far more dangerous regimes," then there's no sense talking to you. 'Cuz you got no sense to talk to.

J.

Oyster, you gotta understan... (Below threshold)

Oyster, you gotta understand. To hyper, it's just brown people killing more brown people, then going on to killing Jews. It's not like it's real people or anything...

J.

Oyster comes out swinging a... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Oyster comes out swinging against democracy! If it doesn't pass her smell test, it's not legitimate!

Anyone else hate liberty enough to accept authoritarian fascist dictatorships as legitimate forms of government?

Jay Tea, it's not about getting rid of dictators who are on a list of threats. It's about allowing people to fucking well vote. It's a good thing without qualification. And the more people in the Middle East get the sense that the West might not want them to exercise their own right to self-determination, which most people here take for granted, the more likely they are to elect anti-Western theocrats. (See what I did there? It's neither clever nor interesting to resort to crass pragmatism or realpolitik. It's lazy and unprincipled.)

I see your point, hyper. Af... (Below threshold)

I see your point, hyper. After all, after the 1979 Iranian revolution, the Gaza elections, and Hezbollah taking over Lebanon, what the hell could possibly go wrong?

J.

"It's about allowing people... (Below threshold)
Les Nessman:

"It's about allowing people to fucking well vote. It's a good thing without qualification."

Really, no qualification? So Canada is a straight Democracy?

If 50% +1 Canadians vote to execute all Hypers, you'd be ok with that?

Right. So you're only in fa... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Right. So you're only in favour of democratic processes, when those processes produce outcomes that are favourable to your own ideological/geopolitical interests.

I read and re-read everything you've posted here, and I'm disappointed that your "argument" is so easily simplified, and so easily dismissed as being trite pragmatic colonialism.

Oh noes! The Egyptians might choose somebody who doesn't like us and/or doesn't like Israel! Better to not let them choose!

You're a moral relativist.

That's not democracy, Les. ... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

That's not democracy, Les. That's majoritarianism.

You know that, so don't pretend to be stupid. It's not becoming of you.

Let the record show that hy... (Below threshold)

Let the record show that hyper is advocating depriving people of food as a political weapon.

J.

Let the record show that Hy... (Below threshold)
914:

Let the record show that Hyper is advocating voting + for it's own posts.

Let the record show that Ja... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Let the record show that Jay Tea is advocating for propping up authoritarian regimes and denying people political franchise because of a perceived cause-and-effect relationship between Barack Obama's energy policies and the cost of wheat in Yemen.

"Right. So you're only in f... (Below threshold)
Timmer:

"Right. So you're only in favour of democratic processes, when those processes produce outcomes that are favourable to your own ideological/geopolitical interests."

Ummm, yeah. A democratic process which outcome turns that country into a theocracy or worse dictatorship, is not a true democratic process. Democracy must be a constant, not a means to a worse form of government.

I am proud to say that in t... (Below threshold)
WildWillie:

I am proud to say that in this day and age I first and foremost think what is in the best interests of my country and my and my families continued safety. Some on this thread seem to not know about the major threat to americans and jews from this area. JT, it is clear that canadians do not care of the brownish people. ww

Let the record show that 91... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Let the record show that 914 is butt-hurt that nobody ever shows him any love because he is incapable of producing coherent, insightful sentences.

So Willie, an unflinching s... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

So Willie, an unflinching support for the ideals upon which your nation was founded—those which a Constitution-fetishist such as yourself purports to hold dearly—is somehow incompatible with democracy in Egypt? Man, that’s a fucked-up way of looking at the world.

So Timmer, what sort of mechanism would you seek to impose on every other country in the world? How would you ensure that democratic outcomes are acceptable, without being a neo-colonialist?

Sure, let's all cheer on th... (Below threshold)
Oyster:

Sure, let's all cheer on the democratic process in Egypt! Please, Hyper, being sanctimonious isn't a becoming trait. Do you really think these will be fair and open elections? I mean, we all know Jimmy Carter will break his leg to get to a microphone to certify them, but for all your pompous lecturing here, you really are naive.

Feeding a troll is kind of ... (Below threshold)
914:

Feeding a troll is kind of fun. But it's a fruitless endeavor.

Don't much care actually. ... (Below threshold)
Timmer:

Don't much care actually. To not want an outcome that best suits you, yours, even the human race in general, is not only silly, it's self-destructive, self-hating and a bit psychotic.

"The human race divides politically into those who want people to be controlled and those who have no such desire." ~RA Heinlein

And yes, it is paradoxical. How do you keep someone else from controlling people without controlling them yourself?

hyperbolist wants an islami... (Below threshold)
Jim Addison:

hyperbolist wants an islamist state in Egypt to threaten Israel and promote jihad. The Muslim Brotherhood is by no means "moderate" in any fashion; they have overtly and directly declared "jihad" against America, and are the parent organization of Hamas and other radical terror groups.

This is 1979 all over again - almost exactly. In 1978, the democracy movement in Iran was indeed supported by the middle class and secular students, not just islamists. The media and leftists like hyperbolist assured us that democracy was a universal virtue.

How's all that working out for ya?

Mr Gravitas Emeritus Addiso... (Below threshold)
Bruce Henry:

Mr Gravitas Emeritus Addison's view, apparently, is that democracy for Arabs and other Muslims is only good after the US invades and occupies their country for a while. THEN, they can have it.

If the demand for it comes bubbling up spontaneously from the people themselves, they need to wait until the US says it's OK.

Which will be as soon as Israel assures us it feels secure. Not one moment later!

Stuck on stupid has arrived... (Below threshold)
914:

Stuck on stupid has arrived!!


Hi Bruce

hyper: "Anyone else hate li... (Below threshold)
Drago:

hyper: "Anyone else hate liberty enough to accept authoritarian fascist dictatorships as legitimate forms of government?"

Please explain the lefts unflinching support and absolute love of Chavez, Castro, Mao, Stalin, Che, etc.

Then, by all means, feel free to lecture the "right" on support for tyrannical regimes.

Too easy.

Actually, Bruce's point was... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Actually, Bruce's point was pithy and germane. On the other hand, 914, your remark was neither clever nor interesting. Not that anyone expects anything beyond that from you. You consistently prove yourself to be that useless little puke who stands behind his friends yelling “Yeah! Yeah! You tell ‘em, fellas!” while your “friends”—whose disdain for you is palpable—ignore your incessant chattering as they go about their business.

Further to Bruce's point, nobody here seemed all that upset when Iraq nearly devolved into an Islamic state. What was so special about Iraqis that they apparently warranted a higher level of respect from the right-wing than Egyptians? I mean, Iraqis didn't even gather in the street and risk their lives to protest living in a dictatorship, whereas a million-plus Egyptians are currently doing just that.

Do you ever get tired of being on the wrong side of history?

Sorry Drago, but I'm not a ... (Below threshold)
hyperbolist:

Sorry Drago, but I'm not a far-left Marxist. I'm a Rawlsian social democrat. I live in Toronto and I like Sweden and Norway as examples of how countries ought to be run.

Social democrats are not okay with totalitarian regimes, whether fascist or Marxist in nature.

I don't actively support any of the regimes you pointed out because they are antithetical to liberal values that must be upheld as a condition for human flourishing. I dislike it that Ronald Reagan was buddy-buddy with fascist dictators, and I dislike it that Clinton was, and Obama is, too.

"Too easy". Right. Keep cheering for the bad guys. Wrong side of history, as I said.

Sorry Drago, but I'm not... (Below threshold)
Evil Otto:

Sorry Drago, but I'm not a far-left Marxist. I'm a Rawlsian social democrat.

Isn't it funny how many meaningless names socialists have for themselves?

Let the record show that... (Below threshold)

Let the record show that Jay Tea is advocating for propping up authoritarian regimes and denying people political franchise because of a perceived cause-and-effect relationship between Barack Obama's energy policies and the cost of wheat in Yemen.

I've been very careful to NOT back a side in the Egyptian riots. Here's the deal, hyper. You have three choices at this point:

1) Cite where I endorsed supporting the Mubarak regime in any way whatsoever.

B) Admit you misstated my position.

III) Get your ass banned.

I'm pulling for #3, myself, but it's your call...

J.

It's a revolution. What ... (Below threshold)
Murgatroyd:

It's a revolution. What was the death toll in the War of Independence? Or the French Revolution? Every loss of human life is regrettable. However, when people die for a cause they believe in, I thought that was meant to be respected.

Yeah, the French Revolution turned out really well, didn't it?

And murderous jihadis are willing to die for a cause they believe in, but you know what? I don't respect that cause at all. Do you?

Jay, maybe you're right in connecting the dots, and this is all something that Obama is deliberately furthering with his policies. Or perhaps Obama has no clue as to how cause and effect work, and recent events have caught him by surprise. Either way, it doesn't speak well of his fitness for the presidency.

Clark's Law: "A sufficiently advanced incompetence is indistinguishable from malice."

Our government has controll... (Below threshold)
Olsoljer:

Our government has controlled crops in the US for quite some time now. Obama has given control of food quality/production to his new czars. Fuel prices are already skyrocketing (not just gasoline, natural gas as well WTF?).
Our farmers used to feed the world. They probably still can - our export of wheat used to be enormous. How about the government encourage growing for export again, and charge the med east the same price for a bushel of wheat as they charge us for a barrel of oil?
The billions of dollars we send overseas to help the poor in other countries only ends up in the hands of the controllers who reinforce their power to keep those starving masses down. How's that foreign aid working out for them?
I could be wrong, but I bet we can go with a reduced fuel consumption longer than those who have us "over a barrel" can go without food.
LMAO Hillary says for the Egyptian government to allow the peaceful assembly and demonstrations to protest their government, and for the military/government to not suppress them - what will she say when OUR government forces us into a similiar situation?

And the canadian rascal run... (Below threshold)
WildWillie:

And the canadian rascal runs from a challenge.

The left certainly has a comprehension problem. They site things we commented on that aren't necessarily there. We might comment that we are for spanking your children then Hyper will say we support molesting children.

Also, I have no disdain for 914. Actually, I hold Hyper in contempt because as most lefties do, they look down their sizable noses at conservatives and common people. ww

Earlier today, I read: ... (Below threshold)
Hank:

Earlier today, I read:

" live in Toronto and I like Sweden and Norway as examples of how countries ought to be run."

Then I came upon this article:

http://www.thelocal.se/31842/20110204/

An excerpt:

An overcrowded hospital in Gothenburg has resorted to giving patients in a children's ward saucepans and spoons to summon assistance in emergency situations, according to a union report.


Swedish medical errors prove ever more costly (4 Jan 11)
Hospital probed as patient dies in wait of operation (13 Mar 10)
Children's hospital faces probe over baby death (22 Jan 10)


At Östra Hospital in Gothenburg, ordinary bedside alarms are not available to every patient due to overcrowding. The saucepans and spoons were issued in the children's ward to lift their spirits.

At another department, the staff shopped at hardware chain Clas Ohlsson to buy bells for their patients, the Swedish Association of Health Professionals (Vårdförbundet) reported on Friday.

The Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare (Socialstyrelsen) found that hospital overcrowding is common at all nine of western Sweden's hospitals with emergency departments.

Try this Hank."Swe... (Below threshold)
Les Nessman:

Try this Hank.

"Swedish Welfare State Collapses as Immigrants Wage War"
http://www.brusselsjournal.com/node/938

Hmmm. Immigrants (aka Islamists) taking over the country.
Kinda puts his trolling position on Egypt in a better light.




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Editors: Jay Tea, Lorie Byrd, Kim Priestap, DJ Drummond, Michael Laprarie, Baron Von Ottomatic, Shawn Mallow, Rick, Dan Karipides, Michael Avitablile, Charlie Quidnunc, Steve Schippert

Emeritus: Paul, Mary Katherine Ham, Jim Addison, Alexander K. McClure, Cassy Fiano, Bill Jempty, John Stansbury, Rob Port

In Memorium: HughS

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