American Muslims take sides — and it’s not ours

Over the weekend, I picked up on this story (courtesy Mike Pechar of The Jawa Report), about the militant Islamists awaiting trial in Lodi, California.

It turns out that most of the evidence against the father and son accused of being part of Al Qaeda is tape-recorded conversations, and the local community says that a man who had made himself an integral part of them has now vanished. The locals say that he must have been the FBI informant.

This is exactly why so many people — myself included — tend to be suspicious of the average Muslim. Here we have pretty clear evidence of a couple of would-be terrorists in their midst, and they are far more concerned with who ratted them out than the fact that they had a member of Al Qaeda living among them.

We see much the same in gangs in cities. “No Snitching” T-shirts are the new big thing, and it seems perfectly legitimate to look down on those who “rat,” or “tattle,” or whatever the derogatory term du jour for informing authorities of illegal activity might be.

Here, in Lodi, we have a clear-cut case of “average” Muslims being presented with a simple choice: do they turn in a potentially dangerous terrorist to the authorities, or do they protect their fellow Muslim?

These people chose in favor of their faith, and against this nation. And I hardly think that this case is an aberration.

If the moderate Muslims of America want to demonstrate what they often proclaim, that they are indeed opposed to terrorism, it’s long overdue that they put deed to words and recognize that FBI informant not as a traitor, but a hero.

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