Arctic Monkeys Smarter Than Al Gore

I don’t know who these guys are but I’m going to buy some of their music. Read some of these quotes:

Arctic Monkeys shiver at Live Earth ‘hypocrisy’

Rock group Arctic Monkeys have become the latest music industry stars to question whether the performers taking part in Live Earth on Saturday are suitable climate change activists.

“It’s a bit patronising for us 21 year olds to try to start to change the world,” said Arctic Monkeys drummer Matt Helders, explaining why the group is not on the bill at any of Al Gore’s charity concerts.

“Especially when we’re using enough power for 10 houses just for (stage) lighting. It’d be a bit hypocritical,” he told AFP in an interview before a concert in Paris.

Bass player Nick O’Malley chimes in: “And we’re always jetting off on aeroplanes!”

Large parts of the band’s hometown of Sheffield were flooded at the end of last month after a deluge of mid-summer rain that some blamed on global warming. Two people were killed.

But the band wonder why anyone would be interested in the opinion of rock stars on a complex scientific issue like climate change.

“Someone asked us to give a quote about what was happening in Sheffield and it’s like ‘who cares what we think about what’s happening’?” added Helders.

“There’s more important people who can have an opinion. Why does it make us have an opinion because we’re in a band?”

You gotta love these guys… but apparently they are not alone:

They are not the only stars to take a cynical view of Live Earth, which aims to raise awareness about global warming but which will require many longhaul flights and thousands of car journeys to and from the music venues.

Many of the biggest acts have questionable environmental credentials — the car-loving rapper Snoop Dogg appeared in a Chrysler commercial last year — and there are doubts about the ability of pop stars to galvanise the world into action.

Bob Geldof, the architect of Live Aid and Live 8, the two biggest awareness-raising concerts in history, had a public spat with Al Gore about the need for the event.

“Why is he (Gore) actually organising them?” Geldof said in an interview with a Dutch newspaper in May, adding that everyone was already aware of global warming and the event needed firm commitments from politicians and polluters.

Roger Daltrey, singer from 1970s British rock band The Who, told British newspaper The Sun in May that “the last thing the planet needs is a rock concert.”

And the singer from 80s pop sensations The Pet Shop Boys, Neil Tennant, attacked the arrogance of pop stars who put themselves forward as role-models.

“I’ve always been against the idea of rock stars lecturing people as if they know something the rest of us don’t,” he was reported as saying by British music magazine NME.

Slowly but surely reality is creeping into the music industry.

H/T Drudge

"He was already in flames. It was obvious he was the real psycho of the pair"
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