Canadian Doctor Describes the Nightmare of Canada’s Health Care System

A doctor who practices in Canada details the frightening realities of socialized medicine. The information in his editorial contains the information Michael Moore doesn’t want Americans to know:

I was once a believer in socialized medicine. As a Canadian, I had soaked up the belief that government-run health care was truly compassionate. What I knew about American health care was unappealing: high expenses and lots of uninsured people.

My health care prejudices crumbled on the way to a medical school class. On a subzero Winnipeg morning in 1997, I cut across the hospital emergency room to shave a few minutes off my frigid commute.

Swinging open the door, I stepped into a nightmare: the ER overflowed with elderly people on stretchers, waiting for admission. Some, it turned out, had waited five days. The air stank with sweat and urine. Right then, I began to reconsider everything that I thought I knew about Canadian health care.

A five day wait for an ER visit? This is what happens when the government takes over health care. And this is just the beginning. Take a look at these numbers:

Government researchers now note that more than 1.5 million Ontarians (or 12% of that province’s population) can’t find family physicians. Health officials in one Nova Scotia community actually resorted to a lottery to determine who’d get a doctor’s appointment.

These problems are not unique to Canada — they characterize all government-run health care systems.

Consider the recent British controversy over a cancer patient who tried to get an appointment with a specialist, only to have it canceled — 48 times. More than 1 million Britons must wait for some type of care, with 200,000 in line for longer than six months. In France, the supply of doctors is so limited that during an August 2003 heat wave — when many doctors were on vacation and hospitals were stretched beyond capacity — 15,000 elderly citizens died. Across Europe, state-of-the-art drugs aren’t available. And so on.

Single-payer systems — confronting dirty hospitals, long waiting lists and substandard treatment — are starting to crack, however. Canadian newspapers are filled with stories of people frustrated by long delays for care. Many Canadians, determined to get the care they need, have begun looking not to lotteries — but to markets.

Competition via the free market is the only way to lower the cost of health care, and many other nations that currently have government run health care systems are learning this. Unfortunately, every Democratic presidential nominee is trying to dupe the American people into thinking that Canada’s system is better than ours. One of the worst negatives of socialized medicine is the lack of research funding.

And if we measure a health care system by how well it serves its sick citizens, American medicine excels. Five-year cancer survival rates bear this out. For leukemia, the American survival rate is almost 50%; the European rate is just 35%. Esophageal carcinoma: 12% in the U.S., 6% in Europe. The survival rate for prostate cancer is 81.2% here, yet 61.7% in France and down to 44.3% in England — a striking variation.

Like many critics of American health care, though, Krugman argues that the costs are just too high: health care spending in Canada and Britain, he notes, is a small fraction of what Americans pay. Again, the picture isn’t quite as clear as he suggests. Because the U.S. is so much wealthier than other countries, it isn’t unreasonable for it to spend more on health care. Take America’s high spending on research and development. M.D. Anderson in Texas, a prominent cancer center, spends more on research than Canada does.

One cancer center in the US spends more money on cancer research than the entire country of Canada. This is what socialized medicine will do to research in this country as well, yet Hillary, Edwards, Obama, and the other Democratic presidential nominees still insist it’s what the American people deserve. I don’t agree. The American people deserve the best heath care system in the world, and a socialized health care system doesn’t even come close.

Link via Lucianne.

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