Supporting the GOP Nominee

Hugh Hewitt, a very, very big Romney supporter, has an article today in which he outlines the seven reasons why Republicans need to support the GOP nominee:

There are seven reasons for anyone to support the eventual nominee no matter who it is: The war and six Supreme Court justices over the age of 68.

Folks who want to take their ball and go home have to realize that even three SCOTUS appointments could revolutionize the way elections are handled in this country in a stroke, mandating the submission of redistricting lines to court scrutiny for “fairness.”

“It is undeniable that political sophisticates understand such fairness and how to go about destroying it,” Justice Souter announced in his diseent in Veith v. Jubilerer, the Pennsylvania redistricting case in which the Court declined by a vote of 5 to 4 to immerse itself in the details of the partisan redistricting of Pennsylvania.

If Democrats control the White House and gain even one of the five seats held by the center-right majority of current justices, this and many other crucial issues are up for legal grabs. When activist judges are more than willing to rewrite rules of long-standing, periods of exile should never be self-imposed “for the good of the party.” Exiles can go on a very long time indeed. Ask the Whigs.

They can go on indefinitely when enforced by courts.

The GOP as well is the party committed to victory in Iraq and the wider war. A four year time-out would be a disaster, a period of time in which al Qaeda and its jihadist off-shoots would regroup in some places and continue to spread in others. Iran, even if punished in the months before November, would certainly continue and accelerate its plans under the soft pleadings of a President Obama or Clinton 2.0.

I agree with Hugh. We have to unite behind the nominee if we have any chance of beating the Democrats this year. However, there are many conservative voters who refuse to support a McCain candidacy and have become so anti-McCain that they’re willing to lose the election instead of vote for him. The New York Post has written about these conservatives and essentially calls them political jihadis (emphasis mine):

Still, McCain has so radicalized key conservatives that some have vowed to turn themselves into suicide voters next November by pulling the lever for Hillary Rodham Clinton over him.

I don’t agree with the characterization that McCain is responsible for the radicalization of these conservatives. They have radicalized themselves. They alone are responsible for their emotions and decisions.

Interestingly, as conservatives are painting McCain as liberal, the DNC is prepared to cast McCain as a right wing conservative who has pushed campaign finance reform in order to hide who he really is. This is from a Democratic email I received just today:

John McCain is a media darling, but don’t trust his carefully-crafted image – he’s worked for years to brand himself. From Iraq to health care, Social Security to special interest tax cuts to ethics, he’s promising nothing more than a third Bush term.

After championing campaign finance reform and ethics legislation to score political points, he now has a staggering amount of lobbyists involved in every aspect of his campaign. In fact, two of the top three sources for John McCain’s campaign cash are D.C. lobbying firms, and he looked the other way as Jack Abramoff bought and paid for the Republican Party and the Culture of Corruption.

On immigration reform, he’s run as far to the right as he can, aligning himself with the most extreme elements of the Republican Party.

On the war, McCain scoffed at Bush’s call to leave troops in Iraq for 50 years, saying “Make it a hundred!”

On a woman’s right to choose, McCain has vowed to appoint judges who would overturn Roe v. Wade.

What a bizarre situation we have. The DNC calls McCain a right wing conservative while conservatives refuse to accept him as one of them.

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