Bernie Sanders in Dark Ages?

Bernie Sanders
“Senator Sanders may insist on living in the dark ages, and his view is not without its partisans. But those views are crude, they are backward …” – Kevin D. Williamson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Here is an excerpt from Kevin D. Williamson’s commentary “Bernie Sanders’s Dark Age Economics“.

Bernie Sanders, the Brooklyn socialist who represents Vermont in the Senate, generated a great deal of mirth on Tuesday when he wondered aloud how it is that a society with 23 kinds of deodorant and 18 kinds of sneakers has hungry children.

Setting aside the fact that we must have hundreds of kinds of deodorant and thousands of choices of sneakers, Senator Sanders here communicates a double falsehood:

The first falsehood is that the proliferation of choices in consumer goods is correlated with poverty, among children or anybody else, which is flatly at odds with practically all modern human experience. The reality is precisely the opposite: Poverty is worst where consumers have the fewest choices, e.g., in North Korea, the old Soviet Union, the socialist paradise that is modern Venezuela, etc.

The second falsehood is that choice in consumer goods represents the loss of resources that might have gone to some other end — that if we had only one kind of sneaker, then there would be more food available for hungry children.

Is Sanders really wanting to become POTUS, or is he merely trying to make Hillary Clinton look good in comparison?

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Just for fun, fill in the thought bubble in the image below.

Bernie Sanders gag

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